Kemper's Reviews > Blackout

Blackout by Connie Willis
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Oct 30, 2010

did not like it
bookshelves: craptacular, sci-fi, time-travel, time-mower-adventures

Warning: This review will be lengthy due to pure hatred.

Did I ever tell you that I’ve got a time machine? There was a freak accident where my laptop and my lawn mower got fused together following a lightning strike, and now I can use it to travel in time. It’s a long story. Anyhow, when I have a chance, I take the occasional trip through history. Recently, I popped into London in 1940 during the Blitz to take a look around. It’s a fascinating time with England hanging on by its fingernails during nightly bombings and waiting for a German invasion that seemed certain.

I was getting ready to return to 2010, and started firing up the time-mower when suddenly three people, two women and a man, ran up excitedly and started wildly shouting questions at me.

“Are you from the retrieval team?”

“Where is your drop?”

“What took you so long?”

After a few minutes they finally calmed down enough to introduce themselves. They were Polly, Eileen and Mike. They saw me with the time-mower and figured out I was from the future. They demanded to know from when.

“My name’s Kemper. I’m from 2010,” I told them.

“Oh, no,” Polly wailed. “You’re not from Oxford?”

“Uh, no. I’m from Kansas,” I replied.

“So you’re not a historian from 2060 like us?” Mike demanded.

“Nope. You guys are from 2060? That’s incredible, what’s it like?” I asked.

“Well, it used to be grand. We got assignments to go back and observe points in history by going undercover to live and work during these times,” Eileen said.

“That sounds like it would be a really exciting adventure,” I said.

“No, it’s awful,” Eileen said. “You see, something terrible has happened. We each had different assignments. I was working with evacuated children in the country, Mike was supposed to observe the ships returning from the rescue of the British army at Dunkirk, and Polly was going to work as a shop girl at one of the department stores.”

“What happened?”

“Well, first, my assignment was terrible. The English lady I worked for made us do all this extra war work while she wouldn’t lift a finger, and I had to deal with all these children. There was this brother and sister, Alf and Binnie, that were always getting into mischief and causing me problems. Then there was measles outbreak so I was quarantined for months with the kids so I was long overdue. When the quarantine finally lifted, my drop wasn’t working. You see, the drops are the spots where we can go back to Oxford in 2060,” Eileen said.

“Yes, and my drop isn’t work either. I got a job at a department store, just as planned, but when I tried to check in, it isn’t working,” Polly said.

“Is your drop not working?” I asked Mike.

“We’re not sure. See, I was supposed to arrive in Dover, but there was slippage. That’s when we don’t arrive exactly when and where we were supposed to. So I ended up 30 miles away in this little village and three days late. A lot of stuff happened after I met Commodore Harold, and it was months before I got back to my drop, and now there are always people around it. They won’t open if anyone from this time frame can see it,” Mike said.

“Who is Commodore Harold?”

“He was this old man at the village. I was trying to get him to take me in his boat to Dover because I had already missed part of the evacuation. But he wouldn’t listen to me and kept insisting that he was going to Dunkirk. Then I fell asleep on his boat, and he took me there. Which was terrible because I probably changed history and now we’ll lose the war,” Mike said. Tears came out of the corners of his eyes.

“We can’t change history,” Polly said.

“Yes, we can. I did,” Mike cried.

“You don’t know that,” Eileen said.

“Yes, I do. It’s all my fault,” he said and sobbed harder.

“Well, if you think you had it bad, I had a terrible time getting a black skirt,” Polly said.

“A black skirt?” I asked in confusion.

“Yes, shop girls must wear a black skirt and everything was confused at Oxford when we were leaving because of schedule changes so wardrobe could only get me a dark blue one. I got the job but the woman in charge would fire me if I didn’t get a black skirt. And I kept trying to get back to the drop so I could go back to Oxford and get one, but I kept getting delayed. When I finally got there, the drop wasn’t working. Plus, I couldn’t wrap the packages properly so I had to spend ever so much time practicing it,” Polly said. Her lip quivered slightly as she remembered the horror of wrapping packages.

“Uh, didn’t they give you any money when you came to the past?” I asked.

“Oh, yes. Tons of it,” Polly said.

“And you were working in a department store?” I said.

“Yes.”

“So why didn’t you just buy a black skirt there instead of spending all that effort trying to time travel to go home and get one?” I said. Polly only looked at me blankly.

“I had problems, too. I tried and tried to get out of the quarantine and sneak back to the drop, but Mr. Samuels locked the doors,” Eileen said.

“Who is Mr. Samuels? A cop or doctor?” I asked.

“No, just the old gardener at the estate,” she said.

“I had a lot of bother getting a newspaper,” Mike volunteered.

“A newspaper?” I asked.

“Yes, I had to spend some time in a hospital, and I wanted to see the war news to see what I had changed. But the nurses thought it was making me too upset. So I had to pretend that I wanted to do the crosswords so they’d leave me the paper,” Mike said proudly.

“OK, forget about the skirt, and the quarantine and the newspaper. Don’t you people have some kind of back-up plan if something went wrong and you couldn’t get to your drops?” I asked.

“Yes, the retrieval teams!” they shouted in unison.

“I was sure that you were with the retrieval team,” Polly said.

“I’ve spent so many hours wondering what was keeping my retrieval team,” Eileen said.

“I’m sure that my retrieval team hasn’t been able to locate me,” Mike said.

“Where, oh where, could our retrieval teams be?” Polly said.

“I thought Mike and Polly were my retrieval team when they found me,” Eileen said.

“And I thought Mike was my retrieval team,” Polly said.

“I know that you two are women and all that, but the next person to say ‘retrieval team’ is getting punched in the throat,” I said. “OK, so those retre…. Er, people were supposed to come and get you if something went wrong, but they haven’t shown. So what was your Plan B?”

“Plan B?” Eileen said.

“Yeah, for if something really went wrong and they couldn’t find you or whatever? Didn’t you have a pre-determined spot to meet out some time later? Or since all you people were running around this time, did they set up some kind of safe-house you could go to in case of emergency?”

“That’s a good idea,” Polly said.

“We’ll have to tell Mr. Dunworthy that we should do that after the retrieval team… OW!… takes us back,” Mike said.

“So no plan other than just sitting around fretting and speculating about what happened? Since you’re worried that they can’t find you, have you put an ad in the paper or anything?” I asked

“Oh, I checked the personals to see if the retrieval team..OW!..placed an ad trying to find us. I thought about putting an ad in so that they could find me, but haven’t done it yet,” Mike said proudly.

“Uh.. You guys do research in the future before you go into the past, right?”

“Of course.” Polly said.

“That would include reading newspapers?”

“Yes, we get a lot of information from newspapers,” Eileen said.

“And it’s never occurred to any of you that if you put a message in that says something like, ‘Hey, Oxford 2060, come pick me up at noon outside Buckingham Palace on Oct. 1?’ that they might see it and meet you there then?” I asked.

“That’s another good idea,” Eileen said. “You’ve got a knack for this, Kemper.”

“Are you kidding me? You’re goddamn time travelers, and you never thought of doing that? Or leaving a letter with a lawyer for delivery to Oxford in 2060? Haven’t you ever seen the Back to the Future movies? Or that episode of Quantum Leap where Sam and Al switched places?” I said.

“Well, I’m not sure that it’s a matter of Oxford not being able to find us. I think something went wrong and that they can’t come back for some reason,” Polly said.

“It’s my fault!” Mike shrieked.

“Oh, do shut up,” Polly snapped. “Even before we left, something was going on. Mr. Dunworthy was changing assignments like mad, and they were having a terrible time finding drop sites. And they were very worried about us reporting any slippage.”

“That’s true,” Mike said. “Mr. Dunworthy changed my assignment from Pearl Harbor to Dunkirk so I had almost no time to prepare. And Polly couldn’t get the right clothes, and Eileen had a hard time getting the driving lessons she needed.”

“So this Mr. Dunworthy is a douche bag that sends you guys into the past with no preparation?” I said.

“Oh, no! He cares about us ever so much. He sets very strict rules about where we can live and work in the past, and if there’s so much of a hint of danger, he’ll pull us right off an assignment. He’d send a retrieval team …OW!…in a second if he knew we were in trouble,” Eileen said confidently.

I sighed and rubbed my temples for a couple of minutes. Then I took a deep breath.

“Let me see, I’ve got this straight. You’re all historians from 2060 at Oxford who work for a guy named Dunworthy who is supposedly very strict about your safety. Yet, he did a last minute change of schedule with no explanation that left people going to England in 1940 unprepared and ill-equipped for the assignment. You were stupid enough to come anyhow, and you’re all seemingly incapable of dealing with anything as mundane as unruly children or overbearing people. Plus, the simplest task like obtaining a black skirt or a newspaper turns into a major undertaking for you. Even outwitting a senile boat captain or a gardner was beyond your abilities. Now something has gone wrong, and your only plan is to sit around whining about your ‘retrieval teams’. Is that about it?” I said.

“Yes, that’s about the size of it,” Mike said.

“Please, Kemper. We really need your help,” Polly said.

“Well, you all may be morons, but it’s your lucky day because a guy with a time-mower showed up. I guess I can’t leave you here,” I said.

“That’s wonderful! So you’ll take a message to Oxford?” Eileen said.

“A message?” I asked.

“Yes. We’ll write a message to Mr. Dunworthy and you can take it to him. Then he’ll send a retrieval team…OW!…back for us,” Polly said.

They just kept grinning and smiling at me as I looked at them in disbelief.

“Guy with a working time machine standing right here,” I said slowly.

They nodded.

“And all you want me to do is to take a message to the future for you?”

They nodded.

“Not, you know, just take you to Oxford in 2060?”

“Oh, no,” Mike said. “What if we left and the retrieval team…OW!…shows up?”

“Changed my mind. Not doing shit for you. Sit here and wait. Hopefully, the Germans will drop a bomb on your stupid, wussy, worthless, whining asses. See ya in hell,” I said as I fired up the time-mower and started to fade away.

The last thing I heard before leaving 1940 was, “When do you think the retrieval team will arrive?”

In Summary of a Shitty Book

I have never been subjected to such painful characters in my life. All three of the major players are exactly the same. Almost the entire book is their inner dialogues which consist solely of fretting about stupid trivial crap, wild speculation that turns out to be completely wrong and repeatedly asking, “Oh, when will the retrieval team arrive?”

You’d think that time travelers should be hardy adventurers with the ability to improvise and adapt to problems. These dumbasses can’t complete the simplest of tasks without it becoming a story of epic proportions. Seriously, the first chapter of this book is a guy trying to find Dunworthy at Oxford and having all these internal discussions with himself about where he might be, where he should look for him, what his secretary will say, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, someone please shoot me. The rest of the book consists of characters doing pretty much the same thing.

Even worse, this is the first of two books so even after reading all this drivel, you don’t get any resolution to the story.

When I’m on my deathbed, I’ll be cursing the name of Connie Willis for writing this piece of shit and tricking me into wasting precious hours of my life.
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Comments (showing 101-150 of 301) (301 new)


message 101: by Velvetink (new)

Velvetink Kemper wrote: "Ceridwen wrote: "Haha!

I read and enjoyed Doomsday Book, because I very much love the black plague, very much.

It wasn't the time travel stuff that bugged me so much. I was OK with her rule..."


GPS I would think would do the trick of tracking them. Probably something even more sophisticated if they were from 2060.


message 102: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Ceridwen wrote: "(If I had a time machine, I would go back and crush like 50 Jurassic butterflies just to see if I really could turn into a lizard person. Sorry butterflies!)"

You could be like Homer Simpson in that episode where he keeps going back in time and screwing everything up until he finally gets made and just starts bashing all the butterflies and dinosaurs with a bat.


message 103: by Debi (new) - rated it 2 stars

Debi Kemper, your review was better than the book. Thanks for giving me something to enjoy.


message 104: by David (last edited May 31, 2011 08:14PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

David Borad Great review. Clever, funny, and absolutely unambiguous about how you felt.

That said, I have to admit I enjoyed Blackout and am enjoying (currently reading) All Clear. But, then, I have a fondness for talky character studies. I do think Willis' style works better in To Say Nothing of the Dog, where the inaction and dithering of the characters works to comedic effect.

I do agree, however, with your opinion of Merope/Eileen. How such an indecisive, feather-brained character could end up as a (presumably) highly trained historian is beyond me.

As a final thought, Terry Pratchett did time-travel to much better effect in Night Watch.


message 105: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Debi wrote: "Kemper, your review was better than the book. Thanks for giving me something to enjoy."

Thanks!


message 106: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper David wrote: "Great review. Clever, funny, and absolutely unambiguous about how you felt.

That said, I have to admit I enjoyed Blackout and am enjoying (currently reading) All Clear. But, then, I have a fondne..."


Thanks. I know some people really seem to like her, but I so completely loathed the dithering nature of all the characters that I'd rather gargle a bucketful of razor blades than read another by her. But that's just me...


message 107: by Elizabeth (new) - added it

Elizabeth i *do* like her. and yet I loathed this too.


message 108: by Cera (new) - rated it 2 stars

Cera I haven't liked anything Connie Willis has written since the 80s, but I read this because it got a Hugo nomination. Your entire review is brilliant, but the paragraph beginning "Let me get this straight" really summed up my fundamental problem with almost everything Willis has ever written about time travel.


message 109: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Cera wrote: "I haven't liked anything Connie Willis has written since the 80s, but I read this because it got a Hugo nomination. Your entire review is brilliant, but the paragraph beginning "Let me get this st..."

Thanks. I tried to boil all my ranting down to the core problems I had with it in that "Let me get this straight." paragraph. Sounds like we had similar issues with it.


message 110: by Willa (new) - rated it 5 stars

Willa To each his own, but just wanted to put in my two cents' worth--I LOVED this book, and All Clear, also. In fact, I both read them, and listened to the audio versions. Willis is probably my favorite author of all time. I love her time travel universe Doesn't mean that it works for everyone, of course.


message 111: by Skip (new) - rated it 3 stars

Skip Absolutely hilarious review, loved reading it. I don't agree with your rating, as I actually liked the book. Even though you're correct that the characters are pretty stupid, I still found it fun to read (once...it certainly won't make any repeat lists for me). Regardless of that, though, I very much enjoyed reading the review.


message 112: by James (new) - rated it 1 star

James Great review! Entertaining and hits the major problems I had (quite a few people have said that too...)

I agree with your masochist comment - I finished Blackout today, and I'll start All Clear tonight.

I just did not connect with the characters, with their the whiney internal monologue, and lack of agency. Things keep happening to them, without them doing anything active - except of course Merope's choice to return to Oxford, to learn to drive, before taking her 1940 driving lessons...

So far the Oxford time travel series are all consistant. Fire Watch (the short story), Doomsday Book, To Say Nothing of the Dog, and Blackout; all feature "historians" who are unprepared for their situation, they moan about what happens, and are surprised when Time corrects itself for the happy ending. Except that Fire Watch works because it is short (and the first example), and To Say Nothing of the Dog works because it is working in the Oscar Wilde/Jerome K. Jerome comic genre, and people are *supposed* to be stupid and confused; almost like the chapter with the tanks where all the characters are named from The Importance of Being Earnest!

And now I head off for All Clear... because I love time travel stories that much, even these ones...


message 113: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper James wrote: "Things keep happening to them, without them doing anything active - except of course Merope's choice to return to Oxford, to learn to drive, before taking her 1940 driving lessons...

Yeah, and even trying to get driving lessons turns into a chapter long excercise in tedious frustration.

I salute your commitment to time travel stories, but would not wish your continued reading on my worst enemy. Good luck and thanks for the kind words.


message 114: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie I hope you get to meet Connie Willis one day Kemper.


message 115: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie .....And I want to be there.


message 116: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Stephanie wrote: "I hope you get to meet Connie Willis one day Kemper."

My reputation is bad enough without me launching into a profanity laced tirade at an elderly British woman. It'd probably be best if we kept an ocean between us.


message 117: by Elizabeth (new) - added it

Elizabeth Connie Willis is American. Hence all the Americanisms in Blackout that drove me nuts.


message 118: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Elizabeth wrote: "Connie Willis is American. Hence all the Americanisms in Blackout that drove me nuts."

For real? I just assumed British. If she's in North America, I just hope I don't bump into her for both our sakes...


message 119: by Elizabeth (new) - added it

Elizabeth yup.


message 120: by Kaethe (new) - added it

Kaethe She lives in Colorado. But Elizabeth, what were the Americanisms that drove you nuts?


message 121: by Elizabeth (new) - added it

Elizabeth It was just little things, but they kept jarring me. There was a family playing Parchesi in an air raid shelter (it's not a common game in Britain, where they usually play a variant called Ludo), and Mike thought something reminded him of baseball stats, which a British person wouldn't, somebody wears a fedora, which doesn't even appear in my Oxford English Dictionary (it would be a trilby). One of the historians, I can't remember which, didn't know what an Anderson shelter was. Every schoolkid in Britain knows what an Anderson is - they do a unit on them in school and make models out of corrugated cardboard! So I would expect an Oxford trained historian with a specialization in WWII to know... It wasn't that the book was riddled with Americanisms, but that they kept poking through the fabric.

It is true that for a number of reasons my antennae are super-tuned to these things. I have been told that I am "probably not the target audience."


message 122: by Skip (new) - rated it 3 stars

Skip Very interesting...being an American myself I didn't notice all those little inconsistencies. Sounds like an opportunity for better proof-reading. I know if I was writing a novel in the voice of a culture not my own, I'd want a native to look it over. Maybe you should volunteer, Elizabeth. :)

I finished All Clear not too long ago, and I will say that it was better than Blackout. Not because any of the things that Kemper so eloquently pointed out in the original post were improved, but because the story moved along and resolved itself. It felt kind of like finishing a fairy tale - you could see the ending coming a mile away, but you still enjoyed it when you got there. I could have done with about 75% less words along the way, though.


message 123: by Elizabeth (new) - added it

Elizabeth I am told by a reliable source that some of the Americanisms are being removed from the British edition of All Clear. But yes, I think it would benefit from 75 per cent of the excess verbage being removed, too.


message 124: by Kaethe (new) - added it

Kaethe Thanks. None of those jumped out at me, but I can see how they would annoy.


message 125: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Due to the fact that this book has become legendary in my brain because of this review and subsequent comments......I'm tempted to torture myself with it.


message 126: by Nancy (new) - added it

Nancy Me too!


message 127: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper You do what you want, but don't come crying to me when you've blinded yourselves to keep from having to read the phrase 'retrieval team' one more time....


message 128: by Stacey (new) - rated it 1 star

Stacey Due to the fact that this book has become legendary in my brain because of this review and subsequent comments......I'm tempted to torture myself with it.

Yeah, did that. I thought, "it can't possibly be that bad!"

It was.


message 129: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Stacey wrote: "Due to the fact that this book has become legendary in my brain because of this review and subsequent comments......I'm tempted to torture myself with it.

Yeah, did that. I thought, "it can't pos..."


HA!


Jm_oriol lol, that's the best of the book!..I do not feel I wasted my time, after reading your review.


message 131: by Ron (new) - rated it 1 star

Ron This review is so brilliant that it makes up for the book's immense suckitude.

Seriously...the first chapter should've tipped me off. Everybody running around looking for everybody else, taking down phone messages on paper. No cell phones or text messages in 2060, apparently.

The only question left, is it worth reading the second book for the comedic value?


message 132: by Odo (new) - rated it 1 star

Odo "When I’m on my deathbed, I’ll be cursing the name of Connie Willis for writing this piece of shit and tricking me into wasting precious hours of my life. "

Ha, ha, ha :) So right!!!


message 133: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Ron wrote: "This review is so brilliant that it makes up for the book's immense suckitude.

The only question left, is it worth reading the second book for the comedic value?..."


Thanks! I won't read the second one. It's been over a year and I still wake up screaming, "Shut up about the retrieval team!"


message 134: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Odo wrote: ""When I’m on my deathbed, I’ll be cursing the name of Connie Willis for writing this piece of shit and tricking me into wasting precious hours of my life. "

Ha, ha, ha :) So right!!!"


She owes all of us...


message 135: by Traveller (new) - added it

Traveller I haven't read the books, and I'll probably give it a quick skim and be prepared to ditch halfway through, due to all the comments and counter-comments re this review.

Whether it is a valid commentary on the book or not, the review itself is extremely entertaining, and worth a read unto itself. I found myself giggling a lot, and laughter is the tonic of the soul, so thanks for giving me my daily laugh, Kemper. Just for that I gave it a 'like'. :)


message 136: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Traveller wrote: "I haven't read the books, and I'll probably give it a quick skim and be prepared to ditch halfway through, due to all the comments and counter-comments re this review.

Whether it is a valid commen..."


You're welcome. Glad you enjoyed it.


message 137: by Amy (new)

Amy THAT was way more enjoyable to read than the book, I'll bet. Yet again you have saved precious moments of my life. Thank you.


message 138: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Amy wrote: "THAT was way more enjoyable to read than the book, I'll bet. Yet again you have saved precious moments of my life. Thank you."

I like to think of my reviews as public service announcements....


Christine I kept thinking "it's go to get better" Reading the book would have been a collasal waste of time. But thankfully your review was hysterical and time well spent


message 140: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Christine wrote: "I kept thinking "it's go to get better" Reading the book would have been a collasal waste of time. But thankfully your review was hysterical and time well spent"

Thanks. I'm glad at least some good came out of this thing.


message 141: by Liz (new)

Liz 'Tis a far far better thing you have done in falling upon your metaphorical sword so that those of us who follow you need not.

I was going to read this and now I won't waste my time or owe the library $18 for turning a book into a dart board. Thanks for taking one for all the discerning readers out there.


message 142: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Liz wrote: "'Tis a far far better thing you have done in falling upon your metaphorical sword so that those of us who follow you need not.

I was going to read this and now I won't waste my time or owe the li..."


I figure that I'm owed a huge karmic debt for this one.


message 143: by H (new) - rated it 1 star

H Gilbert *Sigh* if I'd only read this before getting the audiobook for this neverending work of fiction. Which won the Hugo. Gah. So much for using the Hugo as a yardstick for figuring out what to read next.


message 144: by Cera (new) - rated it 2 stars

Cera The Hugo is a great yardstick for that if you want to know what is most popular with the people who are going to Worldcon in that particular year, and of course the location of Worldcon skews it somewhat because a lot of people can only go when it's local to them.

The vote breakdown for last year's Hugos were really interesting.


message 145: by H (new) - rated it 1 star

H Gilbert Cera wrote: "The Hugo is a great yardstick for that if you want to know what is most popular with the people who are going to Worldcon in that particular year, and of course the location of Worldcon skews it so..."

I heard Cryoburn was also in the running, and I thought that it was one of the lesser books in the Vorkosigan saga. It's getting to the point where the Hugo seems like it's a lifetime achievement award. Some of the nominees of late have been (to me) unimpressive.


message 146: by Cera (last edited Mar 30, 2012 06:21PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Cera I agree completely, H. I enjoyed Cyroburn, but I didn't think it was Hugo-worthy. But a lot of people vote for what they enjoy, not necessarily what they think is good. Or possibly don't even make a distinction between the two.


message 147: by Kristen (last edited Apr 17, 2012 07:10PM) (new) - added it

Kristen Hopefully people don't take your opinion on this book and choose to not read it for themselves because they'd be missing out.


message 148: by Kemper (last edited Apr 18, 2012 06:17AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Kristen wrote: "Hopefully people don't take your opinion on this book and choose to not read it for themselves because they'd be missing out."

Missing out on the stupidest and most passive characters in the history of sci-fi, maybe. And an opportunity to be frustrated beyond belief. Other than that, nothing really comes to mind.


Deborah Culmer Haahahahhah! Agree with every single word. Except I didn't let myself get tricked...quite reading after the third chapter.


message 150: by Kemper (new) - rated it 1 star

Kemper Deborah wrote: "Haahahahhah! Agree with every single word. Except I didn't let myself get tricked...quite reading after the third chapter."

You're smarter than I am. After I while I just kept going to feed the growing rage.


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