Laurel-Rain's Reviews > Domestic Pleasures

Domestic Pleasures by Beth Gutcheon
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
1402123
's review
May 04, 11

Read from April 22 to May 04, 2011

When Raymond Gaver's plane crashes enroute from LA to NY, Charlie Leveque, his attorney, is the one to tell Raymond's ex-wife Martha. Martha, who remembers hating Charlie for his role in turning her world upside down in the divorce from Raymond.

And now she discovers that he is the executor of the estate and the one to whom she must address financial requests for her son Jack.

Sorting through the detritus of a life abruptly ended brings these characters in close proximity with one another, and then, almost by accident, Charlie and Martha become friends. She begins to understand that he is not to blame for how Raymond tore her life apart, and, in fact, he has gone through his own divorce and is left trying to figure out how to raise his teenage daughter Phoebe. They realize they have more in common than they thought.

As their relationship begins to change and they become close, they discover that, as it turns out, their children are tight friends, who may be more than friends. Instead of making life easier, this complicates things.

The journey of these characters in forging their new lives, separately, and later together, is beautifully wrought, set against the backdrop of Manhattan life with all of its complexities.

Gutcheon has a unique talent for showing us what life looks like in Manhattan in the 1990s, and especially how to navigate life after divorce in these times. She is brilliant at dialogue, showing us the delightfully awkward movements of adults discovering new love, just as she also takes us right into the world of teenagers, with all their funky behaviors and appearances. We begin to see each of the characters; we hear what they hear and chuckle at their flaws, foibles, and missteps. Here is an excerpt that spotlights some of the issues for Martha and Charlie:

"Martha looked doubtful. She was so tired she could hardly remember why it was she couldn't just fall into his arms and go to sleep. Why couldn't they just tell the children to behave themselves? Think of the pleasure of cooking breakfast together for all three children, of going to bed together two nights in a row, of going to the supermarket together and deciding together what to cook, of taking a walk together without having to arrange baby-sitters or take three subways to get to each other to do it. Think of sitting together in lamplight after dinner, reading and looking forward to going upstairs to bed together, instead of looking forward to going out in the rain, getting in a cab, and going sixty blocks to sleep alone."

We meet other characters along the way, like Sophie, Charlie's ex-girlfriend, and her sister Connie, whose marriage is falling apart. These characters intersect with the others, almost randomly, but their appearances somehow shape and redefine the lives of our major players.

But what obstacles will appear to seemingly derail their lives? How do the complexities of sharing their domestic lives somehow prevent or complicate those ordinary moments? And how, finally, will each of them sort it all out so that the domestic pleasures can be accessible to them?

I loved "Domestic Pleasures : A Novel" and thoroughly enjoyed savoring the lives of such colorful and real characters that made me root for them, and long for their victories, even as they struggled. There were humorous and sad moments, just as there are in real life, in this memorable tale that I highly recommend for anyone who enjoys touching, piercing stories of love lost, found, and embraced once again. Five stars.
2 likes · likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Domestic Pleasures.
sign in »

Comments (showing 1-4 of 4) (4 new)

dateDown_arrow    newest »

Laurel-Rain Thanks, Eva.


message 2: by Eva (new) - added it

Eva Leger Anytime! I added this to-read after seeing your review. It sounds like a good one!


Laurel-Rain Yes, I loved it...and it's an older novel, from the 1990s, but I remembered how much I enjoyed this author's work. I just ordered another of hers (Still Missing), which was made into a movie called Without a Trace (in the 1980s).


Laurel-Rain Thanks, Sheri!


back to top