Megan's Reviews > Incarceron

Incarceron by Catherine Fisher
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Oct 09, 10

Recommended to Megan by: April
Read from October 05 to 09, 2010 — I own a copy, read count: 1

** spoiler alert ** Incarceron by Katherine Fisher introduces the reader to two different, yet interdependent worlds that at once stretch the imagination and chill the blood. Through her characterization of these worlds, giving each its own personality, limitations and shortcomings, the reader is forced to reconcile the constructs of what can be described as two separate prisons, each keeping its inhabitants in a state of limbo that force them to make do with the rules they must abide.

At the center of this story are Claudia, a seemingly privileged young woman, betrothed to the next king of Realm; and Finn, a misplaced young man who fights for his survival. Claudia's only ally is her tutor, Jared, a man who has cared for her most of her life as her absent father rarely visits and her mother died in childbirth. Finn's allies are slightly more dangerous including his oathbrother Keiro, an old sage Gildas and a loyal girl Attia. Each views Finn's as a meal ticket in some way, although it is only Keiro who the reader fears may actually do Finn harm. However, it is Finn's uniqueness that draws them to him coupled with the realization that he may actually know how to escape their dark existence.

I don't want to ruin much of this book for the reader as each revelation is a delightful surprise that adds a layer of intrigue to an already multifaceted story. I will comment that Fisher's writing is sharp and her characterizations give you a good sense of each player in the story, allowing the reader to feel a strong connection to each one. Also, the concept is decidedly different and fresh and truly is one of the best fantasy novels I've read recently. It's also one of the first novels I've read in recently memory that had a really cool concept at its center and that concept was well-executed and well-written. A refreshing change from the current "Twilight" phenomenon in literature - interesting ideas, terrible execution.

Incarceron was brilliantly executed and I'm excited to read the sequel "Sapphique." Terrific for a young adult novel and terrific for a fantasy novel. Again proving that good writing transcends genres and age groups.
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