jobiwan6's Reviews > E Pluribus Unicorn

E Pluribus Unicorn by Theodore Sturgeon
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Oct 09, 10

bookshelves: science-fiction, read-more-than-once, read-age-21-30
Read in April, 1984 — I own a copy, read count: 10+

I fell in love with the person who gave me "Saucer of Loneliness" to read. Lived with him 13 years, till he died. I still cry when I read the end.
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Quotes jobiwan6 Liked

Theodore Sturgeon
“There was such a rush about me: wing, and tangled spray, and colors upon colors and shades of colors that were not colors at all but shifts of white and silver. If light like that were sound, it would sound like the sea on sand, and if my ears were eyes, they would see such a light.

I crouched there, gasping in the swirl of it, and a flood struck me, shallow and swift, turning up and outward like flower petals where it touched my knees, then soaking me to the waist in its bubble and crash. I pressed my knuckles to my eyes so they would open again. The sea on my lips with the taste of tears and the whole white night shouted and wept aloud.”
Theodore Sturgeon, E Pluribus Unicorn

Theodore Sturgeon
“She was perhaps seventeen when it happened. She was in Central Park, in New York. It was too warm for such an early spring day, and the hammered brown slopes had a dusting of green of precisely the consistency of that morning's hoarfrost on the rocks. But the frost was gone and the grass was brave and tempted some hundreds of pairs of feet from the asphalt and concrete to tread on it.

Hers were among them. The sprouting soil was a surprise to her feet, as the air was to her lungs. Her feet ceased to be shoes as she walked, her body was consciously more than clothes. It was the only kind of day which in itself can make a city-bred person raise his eyes. She did.

For a moment she felt separated from the life she lived, in which there was no fragrance, no silence, in which nothing ever quite fit nor was quite filled. In that moment the ordered disapproval of the buildings around the pallid park could not reach her; for two, three clean breaths it no longer mattered that the whole wide world really belongs to images projected on a screen; to gently groomed goddesses in these steel-and-glass towers; that it belonged, in short, always, always to someone else.”
Theodore Sturgeon, E Pluribus Unicorn

Theodore Sturgeon
“There is in certain living souls a quality of loneliness unspeakable, so great it must be shared as company is shared by lesser beings. Such a loneliness is mine; so know by this that in immensity there is one lonelier than you.”
Theodore Sturgeon, E Pluribus Unicorn


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