Melissa Rochelle's Reviews > Fall of Giants

Fall of Giants by Ken Follett
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Nov 08, 10

bookshelves: historical-fiction
Read on October 01, 2010

One of the early reviews I read stated that this book lacked one of Follett's infamous villains. I disagree. The ultimate villain in this enormous book is clearly war and perhaps the arrogance of world leaders.

I've always had a difficult time understanding the why surrounding World War 1 and this book helps put it in perspective (even if it is fiction). I remember learning in history class that the US got involved because the Germans torpedoed the Lusitania. And it did play a part, but that happened in 1915 and the US didn't declare war on Germany until late-1917/early-1918. I STILL don't understand why Germany got all the blame...wasn't it the Austria-Hungary Empire that started the war for NOT backing down to a fight with Serbia?! Obviously, WW1 was fought because a bunch of arrogant world leaders didn't want to look weak. Looking back, they all look like spineless jerks that killed millions of people because they wanted to "rule the world". By destroying the German economic system after all the fighting was done, they helped Hitler gain power and kill millions more in WW2. Way to go early-20th century world leaders...thanks for all the memories.

I really enjoyed this book and think it's worth it for everyone to read! While the beginning was a little slow (primarily because of all the character introduction required), it picked up speed and was difficult to put down (despite how heavy it was)!


If you liked this, try John Jakes' North and South trilogy. I really think that Fall of Giants is for the 20th century what North and South was for the Civil War.
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Reading Progress

10/04/2010 page 85
8.0%
10/20/2010 page 960
97.0% "almost to the end and i'm bummed that the next in the series isn't going to be finished until 2012!"
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Comments (showing 1-20 of 20) (20 new)

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Carrie Kindred I've just started this one, and I have to agree with you, all the character introductions are slowing me down. It's hard to keep everybody straight at first! I'm glad to hear a positive review though. It makes me more enthusiastic about getting through the first few chapters.


Angelo Vassallo I am reading this book and until now I totally agree with your review.


message 3: by Jessie (new)

Jessie You go girl


Erin I too saw a parallel to the North and the South trilogy; interesting that you too made the same connection.


Conrad I visited the WWI museum in France last year and was struck by something on one of the displays - it stated that there was no real pressing reason for any nation to go to war in 1914. It was a war that could and should have been avoided. If it had there would probably not have been a WWII either (at least with Germany). Sad to think about considering the untold suffering they caused.


Michael S. Great review. I learned a lot more about the causes of WWI from this book also.
Also a big fan of jakes' north and south trilogy. Both are such great "edutainment"


Meghan Rife I am a huge fan of John Jakes. I had read all of his books when someone turned me on to Ken Follett. So far I am loving Follett as well!


message 8: by Meg (new) - rated it 3 stars

Meg I am liking the 2nd book in the trilogy a lot more. Are you reading that one now?


Melissa Rochelle Meg wrote: "I am liking the 2nd book in the trilogy a lot more. Are you reading that one now?"

I've read the second and I really liked it, but I was disappointed because I thought it would cover more of the Cold War. It left me wondering how much of the remaining fifty years he'll actually get to in the next book!


message 10: by David (new)

David Martin im having a hard time getting into this book (part 1). should i power through the first 100 pages? i love his other books but can't seem to get out of the first 4 chapters.


message 11: by Meg (new) - rated it 3 stars

Meg Power through it is getting better and better


Leslie Very good synthesis of World War I. I also felt if it had not been fought we would have not had WWII. Such a travesty and waste of so many lives.


message 13: by Dami (new) - rated it 4 stars

Dami And Fitz is a putz.


message 14: by Judy (new) - added it

Judy This is my reaction to this book, and I am currently only on p 326! There is so much that could have been done to stop this senseless war. The villain is definitely the leaders who thoughtlessly stampeded into this. And yes, Austria made the first big move toward WWI.


message 15: by Dami (last edited Mar 12, 2014 03:59PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Dami And Fitz is the Lord High Putzicutioner.


message 16: by Jake (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jake Gotta check north and south triology while i wait for the 3rd book in this series. thank u


message 17: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann I love books that make me want to re- learn the history. Your review is so correct! The aristocracy was so inept and selfish all over Europe that so many people lost their lives. I don't understand the negative reviews of this book. I read this over 3 days. I could not put it down.


message 18: by Meg (new) - rated it 3 stars

Meg The last book of the trilogy is due in September.


Jeremy Rosd Fitz is the villain, though not follets usual super villain. But Fitz is the one that gets bested by his heroes, William Williams and Eth Leckwith time and time again. The end is follets way of showing Eth and labour won, Fitz and priveledged aristocracy lost.


Jeremy Rosd Fitz is the villain, though not follets usual super villain. But Fitz is the one that gets bested by his heroes, William Williams and Eth Leckwith time and time again. The end is follets way of showing Eth and labour won, Fitz and priveledged aristocracy lost.


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