CB Brim's Reviews > The Kite Runner

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
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Jan 09, 08


This book is a clumsy exercise in melodrama, consistently given a free pass for its topical setting that allows affluent Westerners to feel righteous empathy and solidarity with cliched archetypes. The underlying literary themes in this book - loyalty, family, regret - are all dealt with infinitely better by better authors in better books. Coupled with the fact that the Kite Runner's unweildy prose has all the grace of a highschool newspaper article, it's a wonder how people keep praising it.
Frankly it says more about our need for self congratulation over how understanding and enlightened we are than it does any merit of the book.
The literary value here is vastly lacking compared to the headline news appeal. This is not a book that will not stand the test of time. It pulls together everything that's BIG HOT NEWS right now but at its core is little more than a shadow of a real literary achievement. This is the Spice Girls of books.
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Comments (showing 1-5 of 5) (5 new)

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message 1: by Henry (new)

Henry no doubt it was a pastiche of highschool newspaper reports, mingled with atrocities, language lessons, and bathos bathed in pathos


message 2: by Henry (new)

Henry Next, a novel about Greenland, in which a native is killed by a mining company agent, the engineers rape all the women, and the toxic wastes eventually kill everyone in the village


Manahil Obviously thats exactly what people like you would say sheesh -_- one word man: get a LIFE


Kaushik Sen People like you is why the world is so polluted.


Megan Godber It's only your opinion I know but it's really quite harsh - this book is highly praised and critically acclaimed for a reason and wouldn't be this way if like you say, it has the style of a "high school newspaper". The themes are very relevant to current issues and the book is written by someone who has experienced them first hand, which I think gives them the right more than anyone to express them.


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