Molly G's Reviews > Earthborn

Earthborn by Orson Scott Card
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
751010
's review
Sep 04, 11

bookshelves: mythology, political, religion-philosophy, science-fiction, gender-studies
Read in October, 2006

Reread 12-26-09

Reread 7-21-11. Remember loving it more than I expected to, and still do. Find aspects of it almost painfully/nauseatingly upsetting: the anti-agnostic, anti-intellectual passages. They are mitigated, very beautifully and even truthfully, by the bigger picture of the plot and characterization, whereby logic alone can be used to justify anything, and intellect that is NOT objective is dangerous indeed, but twisted by unaccepted, repressed emotionality; and true intellectuals (e.g. characters from the previous books of the series, Issib and Zdorab and Rasa; and in this one Shedemei and Edhadeya); and by lovely passages like (p338) "The students of her school might have been caught up in the moment but they had been truly educated and not just schooled—they were able to hear something they had never before, analyze it, and decide for themselves that it was worthless…" And yet there is a sharpness to the denouncing passages, whether put in the mouths of characters who are explicitly being "wrong" or not, that… cuts. Have always said of this last book in the "Homecoming" series that it's the closest the books come to the preachiness of C. S. Lewis or Madeleine L'Engle yet strikes me so differently; more inclusive than exlusive. It's just this one aspect I find… unnerving—yes, potentially excluding. Perhaps seeking for the motive of the author behind it, or worrying about it as a rally.

But in any case, that itself is yet another demonstration of what I love about these books. How well they explore, capture, and inspire reflection, of some of the issues of humanity I find most fascinating and formative.
likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Earthborn.
sign in »

No comments have been added yet.