Adam's Reviews > Comanche Moon

Comanche Moon by Catherine Anderson
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Sep 07, 10

bookshelves: audiobooks-a-z
Read from August 31 to September 07, 2010

Post listen review.

What adjective should I use to describe how bad this is? Tragically bad? Majestically bad? Unfailingly bad? Insanely bad? Do you get that I think it's bad?

I subjected my ears to 21 hours of this garbage. It was awful.

Here is what happens in the book. There is some sort of a prophecy (Always a good start right?) where a Comanche warrior is going to meet a "honey haired" woman and ummm... get it on with her I guess... and then they will... move west. The Comanche warrior, Hunter of the Wolf, whom I might add never hunts any wolves ever in the book, is on a raiding party to get revenge on the white settlers that slaughtered his first wife. And a blond woman comes out (the honey haired one) and through some weird complications offers herself up as prisoner to the Comanches to save her family.

Then guess what happens? Yep they fall in love. It's just like beauty and the beast. Only you know how that was a half decent movie? This is less than a half decent book. Loretta (aka honey hair, aka little wise one) comes to live with the Comanches, respect their ways and convince the dude to let her go free. The whole time (despite five separate instances of ripped bodices and three instances of "too generous necklines") she never loses her "purity" with the guy. Even though it is very obvious she wants to even if she won't admit that to herself.

Once back at her place, she decides she can't live without the guy and goes back to his home willingly this time (Beauty and the Beast again). The main reason for this is that no one believes she "kept her purity". And so I would think she would just go back and be all into the guy right? Nope. She (quite unbelievable to me) convinces Hunter to get a priest to come and marry them so it is all on the up and up, even if she is the only one who knows that. Well, the only white person who knows that and in Loretta's world apparently only white people's opinions count. And then what does she do? She won't let him touch her for two months after they are officially married even though, well she wants to, you can tell. She asks Hunter' "Why would you want to be with me?" and I as the listener, said to myself, "Not for any good reason, that is for sure." But I guess he likes her and decides to change his white man killing ways.

But white people are jerks and still kill the Comanches a lot so Loretta is this time captured by white mercenaries and Hunter has to go and get her back. Only she escapes first and he gets to pretty much meet up with her at her house instead. And they are even more in love now, only this time, she is pregnant too. Yay!

They decide to move west and umm... I dunno I guess the whole Native American slaughter thing is ok now cause they got to umm... move west.

But there are a few utterly bizarre things about this book that don't involve the plot.

The first is this. It is sort of written well. The author has great descriptions of the plains and western life and you feel like you are there. But she immediately spoils it with dialogue like, "Lordy what can have happened to my pantallettes?" or "If you are not with me my heart will be on the floor. This is a promise this Comanche makes for you."

Yet the author goes to the trouble of putting real Comanche words in so she can respect the culture, but not enough to make them anything more than broad shouldered, well muscled, savages that all wish they were with white women. (Except for the one guy who is the bad Comanche, he doesn't like white people at all.)

Another thing I found bizarre was, well, the number of times the woman is tied up. I think she was tied up more than Wonder Woman was in her first ten issues. (which is to say a lot)

Hunter seemed to have a real penchat for sniffing women's undergarments too. (that is what happened to the pantallettes. He stole them to get a good personal sniff)

Finally, I am detecting a theme in these romance books. The name of the woman, Loretta, has the meaning "little wise one". She doesn't know that at the start of the book but it is implied that she is smart. So smart that she believes absolutely everyone around her except the one guy who never lies to her. She believes her jerk of an uncle that tries to rape her, she believes the cousin of Hunter, who tells her how evil Hunter is and has her convinced that Hunter killed her mother, she believes the other settlers when they say the Comanches are cannibals. But she won't believe that Hunter isn't going to kill her. Even though he never once tries to or shows any indication for it. So all the women are said to be smart but are not. What is with that in these romance books? It does a real disservice to women I think.

Pre-listen guess.

I bet this sucks.
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Comments (showing 1-8 of 8) (8 new)

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message 1: by Ian (new)

Ian Good guess.


Loederkoningin Darn it. I nearly sprayed my coke over my keyboard.


message 3: by Adam (new) - rated it 1 star

Adam Next time I'll just have to try harder and get that coke to spray. Don't worry, the library has lots of terrible romance books I will listen to so there will be plenty of opportunity for it.


Loederkoningin that sounds reassuring.


Carisa You made laugh so hard... thanks for the review, it seems this book has everything I don't like


Sophia why would you listen to a romance book, if you don't like them?


message 7: by Adam (new) - rated it 1 star

Adam I am trying to listen to all of the audio books at my local library, there just happens to be a lot of romance in there. I am trying to listen to them all for the hope that I find something I do like. I do like some romance books, just not this one, or ones like it.


Sophia I would imagine it would be... awkward to listen to a romance novel.


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