Kristen Northrup's Reviews > The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches: A Practical (and Fun) Guide to Enjoying Life More by Spending Less

The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches by Jeff Yeager
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Aug 13, 10

bookshelves: consumerism, fromlibrary, nonfiction, personal-finance
Read in August, 2010

I'm fine with the fact that most of this book was common sense. That's the only kind of personal finance book I'm going to trust anyway. The fact that everyone knows how they *should* spend/save/eat/etc doesn't magically make it happen and regular reminders and reinforcements are very useful.

What made the book almost unendurable for me (but I did finish it) was the cheesy sense of humor, especially when it crossed over into repeated requests for sexy photos from female readers and regular slams of Suze Orman. Not even her advice -- just her appearance. I've never watched her shows or whatever, but that's just inappropriate on general principle. Several principles, really.

I also get plenty of Stan Lee's style from Stan Lee himself, but that's just tiring, not offensive. Also charming - Every chapter begins with a handful of 'clever' quotes and at least one in each batch is from the author.

There were some valid points mixed into all that. Thinking in terms of choices rather than sacrifices. Settling for less beats being unsettled. Fiscal fasting and 'What was I thinking?' audits. References to Dominguez and Robin. And a really tasty sounding pasta and sausage dish.

I disagree that small savings (like the popular Starbucks ban) are useless. It all depends on what you do with the funds instead, and some people really can accumulate them for a useful purpose. Staying in the first house that you buy makes all kinds of fiscal and psychological sense if you can do it (I particularly liked the part about being able to decorate for yourself rather than for the market) but many of us have careers that require regular relocation. Not to mention aging parents, etc. I do agree that giving up a car is easier than people realize because I don't have one myself; and that's in an area with no public transportation. Asking to telecommute in lieu of a raise, however, is very creative thinking but unlikely to work out for most readers.

Unavoidable with his nonprofit background, but the advice to regularly read books about people who are truly suffering to help keep perspective isn't going to be attempted by many readers. It's not even particularly relevant. He's also a terrible travel snob.
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Jessica " The fact that everyone knows how they *should* spend/save/eat/etc doesn't magically make it happen and regular reminders and reinforcements are very useful."

agreed!


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