Michael's Reviews > The Tell Tale Heart

The Tell Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe
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Aug 11, 2010

really liked it
bookshelves: classics, short-stories, gothic, 19th-century
Read on August 11, 2010

The Tell-Tale Heart is a story about an unnamed person who insists on their sanity after murdering an old man with an evil eye. The murder was cold, calculated and well executed, the body disposed; but the guilt slowly eats away at the person.

The story uses an unreliable narrator very effectively; driving the story without giving too much away, to keep it tense. The narrator is genderless though most people assume he’s a man, it could just as easily been a woman. The way the story is written, you can see the narrator slowly self-destructing; starting by insisting that they are innocent and sane.

I noticed Edgar Allan Poe seems to italicise words throughout the story – though some versions of the story put the words in uppercase. I gather it is done to add emphasis on the words but there is another reason why Poe used to do this. Poe used to italicise words that were foreign or words he thought he had made up or found another way to use the word.

The Tell-Tale Heart is a classic chiller and well executed to keep the reader feeling on edge. I’m glad I read it and it has given me some ideas on my current WIP.
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02/02/2016 marked as: read

Comments (showing 1-11 of 11) (11 new)

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message 1: by Franky (new)

Franky Yes, this is such an awesome story. Unreliable narrative gives this such an amazing twist. Poe is one of my favorite authors. You said it best when you said that guilt eats him away. Huge part of the story. Good insight.

So, have you read any other Poe stuff?


Michael I'm trying to work my way through most of his books, this is my favourite so far


message 3: by Franky (new)

Franky Cool. His stories don't exactly make you feel happy or anything, and can be downright somber, but two of my favorites are "The Masque of Red Death" and "The Fall of the House of Usher."


Michael Franky wrote: "Cool. His stories don't exactly make you feel happy or anything, and can be downright somber, but two of my favorites are "The Masque of Red Death" and "The Fall of the House of Usher.""

I've read The Fall of the House of Usher


Samantha Shank Great review!


message 6: by Abel (new)

Abel Guerrero I thought it would amuse and maybe flatter you to know that your review was directly copied and pasted and presented to me as a student's Home Learning.

There's always one who think they can cheat and get away with it ...


Michael Abel wrote: "I thought it would amuse and maybe flatter you to know that your review was directly copied and pasted and presented to me as a student's Home Learning.

There's always one who think they can cheat..."


Interesting...I wouldn't call this a good review either.


Enrik I agree with you, I haven't thought that the murderer can also be a woman. This can make also a lot of sense because she can also be a servant of the old man


Laura Tamayo Michael I liked what you said about the narrator fitting the mystery driven story perfectly, he really didn't give much away which built suspense.


Ramon Sigrist Great Review, I agree with you, the narrator doesn't give it all away and makes the story more interesting and makes you want to finish.


Joseff Michael I agree with what you said about the uncertainty with the narrator, it gives the story a different point of view.


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