Jamie Fairbanks's Reviews > Into the Wild

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
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Jan 19, 08

Recommended for: Anyone
Read in January, 2008

I first heard about Christopher McCandless in college or shortly thereafter, some years after he died, via a song by Harrod and Funck, who were college favorites. But then I knew nothing about him except from the lyrics of their song "Walk Into the Wild" (they change his name slightly to Chris McCandle).

Then this fall "Into the Wild" with Sean Penn at the helm came out in theaters with Emile Hirsch playing the tormented Alexander Supertramp. I went to see it and the movie stayed in my head for days. Emile was truly brilliant conveying Chris/Alex. If he doesn't get the Oscar I'll be surprised. Sean Penn conveyed what I believe should have been conveyed of this young man's life. It was, in the truest sense, a beautiful tragedy. You have to, or don't have to, admire what he was striving for and believed in and lived out. But at the same time he robbed himself, his family and the world of knowing him any further. From the bits you learn of him from those he encountered he was quite remakable, if not too idealistic. I can't recommend seeing the movie enough. So being intrigued by the movie I picked up the paperback the other day and am reading it now. It's short - a quick read. I also recommend it. The movie follows closely the book so far, but seeing the movie makes his life and the people in it in tangible and more heart-gripping. I even think I would recommned the movie first - it was that good. Watching the movie first also made me care about the subject matter in the book more as its a bit more tangential.


Walk Into the Wild by Harrod and Funck:

There's a dead man in the bus at Sushana River.
Where the cold air punishes you more than any fever;
Where the tundra feeds the miles and the estate of imagination grows wild.

Throwing hats up in the air, what good is college anywhere?
Not for Christopher McCandle, Alexander was his new handle thumbing to Alaska.
Finally free from this world, "I now walk into the wild.
Return all mail to sender, 'til we never meet again. Love, Alexander."

Spring thaw was around the bend when he crossed over the border in the frozen month of May.
By the river he saw the magic bus, Alex jots in his picket log, "a marvelous fourth day."
Snapping meals with his Minolta, no pool, no pets, no cigarettes.
Carves his fate into the ceiling..."I'm never leaving. The West is the best."

Maybe later he'd change the world -- Alexandria, city of gold.
It was the greatest ever misadventure,
But Alex could never read the evil poetry in his white world.

The bag of rice emptied yesterday, ranging through the wood, Alex knows the food is low.
But his ragged sould will never die, he rereads his tattered Walden and Dr. Zhivago.
Catch a fish, cherish the moment as he smokes it in the dirt.
His belly cries out louder, it's more trouble than it's worth.

Getting weaker by the day, without that map he burned Alex has lost his way.
Imprisoned by the river, day 100 still had the sweetest taste.
Writing on the bus, his mind slips into a dream.
"In God's name someone help me." Signed Chris McCandle.

Maybe later he'd change the world -- Alexandria, city of gold.
It was the greatest ever misadventure,
But Alex could never read the evil poetry in his white world.

There's a dead man in the bus at Sushana River.
Where the cold air punishes you more than any fever;
Where the tundra feeds the miles and the estate of imagination grows wild.


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message 1: by DeAprillia (last edited Mar 02, 2008 08:19PM) (new) - added it

DeAprillia I agree w U..
After watching the movie, it stayed in my head at least for a week.. and i still can't get him & his adventure out of my head...
I can't imagine there's such a man lived in this world...he really was one of a kind.

Personally, I envy him...and respect what he believed...


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