Patrice's Reviews > Reflections on the Revolution in France

Reflections on the Revolution in France by Edmund Burke
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May 12, 2010

really liked it
Read from April 30 to May 02, 2010

OK, he's a genius. He repeats himself and sometimes I had a hard time staying awake while reading this, but then he'll throw out a few one liners that astound. I finally got tired of writing "Obama" in the margins. I wonder if Obama has read this? Has anyone who loves Obama read this? Every word applies to the US today. Benevolence turns to weakness and then oppression. A strong country must have a strong economy. Following ideology in the face of reality leads to destruction. Taking the advice of those who wish to plunder is foolish. Plundering is not "justice". So many common sense truths.

But then he'll throw in some support for the class system and my thoroughly American heart and mind rebels. There were times when I wondered if he was truly in the employ of the British king, as I think I heard somewhere.

But bottom line what he says made sense, then as well as today. And, unfortunately, many prefer to fly in the face of common sense.
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05/01/2010 page 120
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Comments (showing 1-8 of 8) (8 new)

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Victoria (vikz writes) what do you think of it so far?


message 2: by Patrice (last edited May 04, 2010 02:26PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Patrice Not sure. I find it a bit confusing. It seems kind of repetitive. But from what I've heard he wrote it before the worst of the revolution and of course before Napolean. I'm trying to figure him out. He's a counter revolutionary and for good reason. Did he identify Irish? Then he'd hate Cromwell, right? This is all totally new to me so I'm just trying to figure it out. Why did he support the American Revolution if he's so conservative?

I'm rambling.

What keeps going through my mind as I read is the Beatles song "You say you want a revolution? Well, yeah, we all want to change the world. But when you talk about destruction, you can count me out!"

Pleeease, if you have any ideas share them. You are in England right? I'd love to have your POV!


Adelle Have NO idea when I'll get to it, but you've MADE me put it on my list!


Geoff Sebesta odd, I was reading it and remarking to myself how far someone would have to stretch to tag Obama's name on this. And then you went and did it! Thanks for being exactly what I expected!


Patrice Odd that Obama came to mind while YOU were reading this. ;-)


Geoff Sebesta well, I was watching the news and people were making the most idiotic conspiracy theories about him so it came to mind. I don't think there's anything in Burke that applies to him whatsoever.


Justin Evans I agree. Obama mostly came to mind when Burke was praising something. For instance, "government is a contrivance of human wisdom to provide for human wants. Men have a right that these wants should be provided for by this wisdom. Among these wants is to be reckoned the want, out of civil society, of a sufficient restraint upon their passions." Or "whatever each man can separately do, without trespassing on others, he has a right to do for himself; and he has a right to a fair portion of all which society, with all its combinations of skill and force, can do in his favor." Or his attacks on the madness of financial instability and speculation. Or "poverty cannot be voluntary... we provide first for the poor." Yep. Totally a contemporary American conservative, old Burke.


sologdin the obama commentary is absolutely ultra vires.


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