Lindsey's Reviews > The Wise Man's Fear

The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss
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Mar 23, 11

bookshelves: fantasy
Read from March 10 to 23, 2011 — I own a copy, read count: 1

Without the freshness of the first book, but with the added benefit of slipping back in to a familiar world. Just like in The Name of the Wind, Rothfuss does a wonderful job with his lyric phrasing, leading the reader to slip from one chapter to the next with no regard for time.

The story, as readers of the first book know, continues the exploits of Kvothe, legend in his own time. While the first book's story took place over 15-16 years, this one only stretches through about 2 years. We learn more of Kvothe's exploits at the University; see how his reputation grew over time; watch his faults multiply even as his skills grow; discover previously unseen parts of Kvothe's world; and, perhaps most importantly, get a wider glimpse into the framing story.

The important motifs of Rothfuss' creation start to peek through in this novel: the naming, the story-telling, the morality of choosing. Definitely a worthwhile read for fans of the first book. The series to this point is recommended for all epic fantasy fans.
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Quotes Lindsey Liked

Patrick Rothfuss
“There are three things all wise men fear: the sea in storm, a night with no moon, and the anger of a gentle man.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear

Patrick Rothfuss
“You can divide infinity an infinite number of times, and the resulting pieces will still be infinitely large,” Uresh said in his odd Lenatti accent. “But if you divide a non-infinite number an infinite number of times the resulting pieces are non-infinitely small. Since they are non-infinitely small, but there are an infinite number of them, if you add them back together, their sum is infinite. This implies any number is, in fact, infinite.”
“Wow,” Elodin said after a long pause. He leveled a serious finger at the Lenatti man. “Uresh. Your next assignment is to have sex. If you do not know how to do this, see me after class.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear

Patrick Rothfuss
“Re'lar Kvothe," he said seriously. "I am trying to wake your sleeping mind to the subtle language the world is whispering. I am trying to seduce you into understanding. I am trying to teach you." He leaned forward until his face was almost touching mine. "Quit grabbing at my tits.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear

Patrick Rothfuss
“I know," she said. "You have a stone in your heart, and some days it's so heavy there is nothing to be done. But you don't have to be alone for it. You should have come to me. I understand.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear

Patrick Rothfuss
“It's the questions we can't answer that teach us the most. They teach us how to think. If you give a man an answer, all he gains is a little fact. But give him a question and he'll look for his own answers.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear

Patrick Rothfuss
“Half of seeming clever is keeping your mouth shut at the right times.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear

Patrick Rothfuss
“I’d heard he had started a fistfight in one of the seedier local taverns because someone had insisted on saying the word “utilize” instead of “use.”
Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear


Reading Progress

03/11/2011 page 142
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