Quotes About Poetry

Quotes tagged as "poetry" (showing 31-60 of 3,000)
Robert Frost
“Forgive, O Lord, my little jokes on Thee
And I'll forgive Thy great big one on me.”
Robert Frost

Charles Darwin
“If I had my life to live over again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week.”
Charles Darwin, The Autobiography of Charles Darwin, 1809–82

Sylvia Plath
“I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead;
I lift my eyes and all is born again.”
Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

T.S. Eliot
“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.”
T.S. Eliot

T.S. Eliot
“This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.”
T.S. Eliot

Ian Fleming
“You only live twice:
Once when you are born
And once when you look death in the face”
Ian Fleming, You Only Live Twice

Anne Sexton
“Watch out for intellect,
because it knows so much it knows nothing
and leaves you hanging upside down,
mouthing knowledge as your heart
falls out of your mouth.”
Anne Sexton, The Complete Poems

Charles Baudelaire
“Always be a poet, even in prose.”
Charles Baudelaire

Seamus Heaney
“If you have the words, there's always a chance that you'll find the way.”
Seamus Heaney, Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney

Robert Frost
“Poetry is what gets lost in translation.”
Robert Frost

Charles Bukowski
“Poetry is what happens when nothing else can.”
Charles Bukowski

Kobayashi Issa
“What a strange thing!
to be alive
beneath cherry blossoms.”
Kobayashi Issa, Poems

Charles Baudelaire
“One should always be drunk. That's all that matters...But with what? With wine, with poetry, or with virtue, as you chose. But get drunk.”
Charles Baudelaire

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Ho! Ho! Ho! To the bottle I go
To heal my heart and drown my woe
Rain may fall, and wind may blow
And many miles be still to go
But under a tall tree will I lie
And let the clouds go sailing by”
J.R.R. Tolkien

Rick Riordan
“You might as well ask an artist to explain his art, or ask a poet to explain his poem. It defeats the purpose. The meaning is only clear thorough the search.”
Rick Riordan

William Shakespeare
“Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove.
O no, it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wand'ring barque,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.”
William Shakespeare, Great Sonnets

Gustave Flaubert
“There is not a particle of life which does not bear poetry within it”
Gustave Flaubert

T.S. Eliot
“We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.”
T.S. Eliot, Four Quartets

Derek Walcott
“Break a vase, and the love that reassembles the fragments is stronger than that love which took its symmetry for granted when it was whole.”
Derek Walcott

William Shakespeare
“I like this place and could willingly waste my time in it.”
William Shakespeare

Osip Mandelstam
“My turn shall also come:
I sense the spreading of a wing.”
Osip Mandelstam, The Selected Poems

Percy Bysshe Shelley
“I have drunken deep of joy,
And I will taste no other wine tonight.”
Percy Bysshe Shelley

E.E. Cummings
“i like my body when it is with your
body. It is so quite new a thing.
Muscles better and nerves more.
i like your body. i like what it does,
i like its hows. i like to feel the spine
of your body and its bones, and the trembling
-firm-smooth ness and which i will
again and again and again
kiss, i like kissing this and that of you,
i like, slowly stroking the, shocking fuzz
of your electric fur, and what-is-it comes
over parting flesh ... And eyes big love-crumbs,

and possibly i like the thrill

of under me you so quite new.”
E.E. Cummings

Shel Silverstein
“The Little Boy and the Old Man

Said the little boy, "Sometimes I drop my spoon."
Said the old man, "I do that too."
The little boy whispered, "I wet my pants."
I do that too," laughed the little old man.
Said the little boy, "I often cry."
The old man nodded, "So do I."
But worst of all," said the boy, "it seems
Grown-ups don't pay attention to me."
And he felt the warmth of a wrinkled old hand.
I know what you mean," said the little old man.”
Shel Silverstein

W.H. Auden
“Poetry might be defined as the clear expression of mixed feelings.”
W.H. Auden, New Year Letter

George Gordon Byron
“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,
There is a rapture on the lonely shore,
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more”
George Gordon Byron

Lawrence Ferlinghetti
“I am awaiting
perpetually and forever
a renaissance of wonder”
Lawrence Ferlinghetti

T.S. Eliot
“Do I dare
Disturb the universe?
In a minute there is time
For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.”
T.S. Eliot

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
We must away ere break of day
To seek the pale enchanted gold.

The dwarves of yore made mighty spells,
While hammers fell like ringing bells
In places deep, where dark things sleep,
In hollow halls beneath the fells.

For ancient king and elvish lord
There many a gleaming golden hoard
They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
To hide in gems on hilt of sword.

On silver necklaces they strung
The flowering stars, on crowns they hung
The dragon-fire, in twisted wire
They meshed the light of moon and sun.

Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
We must away, ere break of day,
To claim our long-forgotten gold.

Goblets they carved there for themselves
And harps of gold; where no man delves
There lay they long, and many a song
Was sung unheard by men or elves.

The pines were roaring on the height,
The wind was moaning in the night.
The fire was red, it flaming spread;
The trees like torches blazed with light.

The bells were ringing in the dale
And men looked up with faces pale;
The dragon's ire more fierce than fire
Laid low their towers and houses frail.

The mountain smoked beneath the moon;
The dwarves, they heard the tramp of doom.
They fled their hall to dying fall
Beneath his feet, beneath the moon.

Far over the misty mountains grim
To dungeons deep and caverns dim
We must away, ere break of day,
To win our harps and gold from him!”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

E.E. Cummings
“Lovers alone wear sunlight.”
E.E. Cummings

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