Quotes About Zoo

Quotes tagged as "zoo" (showing 1-30 of 36)
Bret Easton Ellis
“The seals stupidly dive off rocks into swirling black water, barking mindlessly. The zookeepers feed them dead fish. A crowd gathers around the tank, mostly adults, a few accompanied by children. On the seals' tank a plaque warns: COINS CAN KILL——IF SWALLOWED, COINS CAN LODGE IN AN ANIMAL'S STOMACH AND CAUSE ULCERS, INFECTIONS AND DEATH. DO NOT THROW COINS IN THE POOL. So what do I do? Toss a handful of change into the tank when none of the zookeepers are watching. It's not the seals I hate——it's the audience's enjoyment of them that bothers me.”
Bret Easton Ellis, American Psycho

Nadine Gordimer
“The caged eagle become a metaphor for all forms of isolation, the ultimate in imprisonment. A zoo is prison.”
Nadine Gordimer, Get a Life

Carl Sagan
“I think the discomfort that some people feel in going to the monkey cages at the zoo is a warning sign.”
Carl Sagan, The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View of the Search for God

Edward Abbey
“A world without huge regions of total wilderness would be a cage; a world without lions and tigers and vultures and snakes and elk and bison would be - will be - a human zoo. A high-tech slum.”
Edward Abbey, Postcards from Ed: Dispatches and Salvos from an American Iconoclast

Evan Esar
“Zoo: An excellent lace to study the habits of human beings”
Evan Esar

Jennifer L. Armentrout
“I think so. I want a hamburger and a hot dog." I paused. “And ice cream in one of those waffle cones. And— and I want to see the big kitties.”
Jennifer L. Armentrout, Pure

Thomas French
“All zoos, even the most enlightened, are built upon the idea both beguiling and repellent—the notion that we can seek out the wildness of the world and behold its beauty, but that we must first contain that wildness. Zoos argue that they are fighting for the conservation of the Earth, that they educate the public and provide refuge and support for vanishing species. And they are right. Animal-rights groups argue that zoos traffic in living creatures, exploiting them for financial gain and amusement. And they are right. Caught inside this contradiction are the animals themselves, and the humans charged with their well-being.”
Thomas French, Zoo Story: Life in the Garden of Captives

Thomas French
“Taken together, the narratives of how the animals ended up at Lowry Park revealed as much about Homo sapiens as they revealed about the animals themselves. The precise details—how and where each was born, how they were separated from their mothers and taken into custody, all they had witnessed and experienced on their way to becoming the property of this particular zoo—could have filled an encyclopedia with insights into human behavior and psychology, human geopolitics and history and commerce. Lowry Park’s very existence declared our presumption of supremacy, the ancient belief that we have been granted dominion over other creatures and have the right to do with them as we please. The zoo was a living catalogue of our fears and obsessions, the ways we see animals and see ourselves, all the things we prefer not to see at all. Every corner of the grounds revealed our appetite for amusement and diversion, no matter what the cost. Our longing for the wildness we have lost inside ourselves. Our instinct to both exalt nature and control it. Our deepest wish to love and protect other species even as we scorch their forests and poison their rivers and shove them toward oblivion.
All of it was on display in the garden of captives.”
Thomas French, Zoo Story: Life in the Garden of Captives

Thomas French
“Despite all their flaws, zoos wake us up. They invite us to step outside our most basic assumptions. Offered for our contemplation, the animals remind us of nature’s impossibly varied schemes for survival, all the strategies that species rely upon for courtship and mating and protecting the young and establishing dominance and hunting for something to eat and avoiding being eaten. On a good day, zoos shake people into recognizing the manifold possibilities of existence, what it’s like to walk across the Earth, or swim in its oceans of fly above its forests—even though most animals on display will never have the chance to do any of those things again, at least not in the wild.”
Thomas French, Zoo Story: Life in the Garden of Captives

Kat Zhang
“There's only so long you can be at the zoo before it gets old.”
Kat Zhang, What's Left of Me

Yann Martel
“Life is so beautiful that death has fallen in love with it, a jealous, possessive love that grabs at what it can get.”
Yann Martel, Life of Pi

Mehmet Murat ildan
“Every time you go to the zoo, you prolong the captivity of the animals there! If no one goes to the zoos, there will be no zoos! Destroying the evil is very simple and it is in your hand!”
Mehmet Murat ildan
tags: zoo

“For several thousand years man has been in contact with animals whose character and habits have been deformed by domestication. He has ended by believing that he understands them. All he means by this is that he is able to rely on certain reflex actions which he himself has implanted in them. He will flatter himself at times on the grasp of animal psychology which has brought him the love of the dog and the purr of the cat; and on the strength of such assumptions he approaches the beasts of the jungle. The old tag about nature being an open book is just not true. What nature offers on a first examination may appear to be simple but it is never as simple as it appears.”
Hans Brick, Jungle, Be Gentle

Cees Nooteboom
“Surely one zoo in the world should have the courage to draw the ultimate conclusion about our ancestry? A cage with Homo Sapiens in all its varying forms, perhaps then we would understand ourselves better. The question of course is whether the other animals would approve of it.

Cees Nooteboom, Nomad's Hotel: Travels in Time and Space
tags: zoo

Yann Martel
“I don't mean to defend zoos. Close them all down if you want (and let us hope that what wildlife remains can survive in what is left of the natural world). I know zoos are no longer in people's good graces. Religion faces the same problem. Certain illusion about freedom plague them both.”
Yann Martel, Life of Pi

Sloane Crosley
“There's a lot of pointing. A festival of pointing and at very close range to other people's eyes, given the width of the space. Also detracting from the exhibit's potential tranquility is the display cabinet of pinned specimens along one wall. I found this disturbing from the start. You don't see a whole lot of stuffed polar bears in the polar bear exhibit at the zoo, for instance. And butterflies have phenomenal vision so it's not like they can't see the mass crucifixion in their midst. I was offended on behalf of the butterflies and thus pleased with my offense. Let the empathizing begin! This volunteering thing was working already. I am a good person, hear me give!”
Sloane Crosley, I Was Told There'd Be Cake

Wendy Beck
“Better to honor the pinch of fear than regret the punch of fang.”
Wendy Beck, 9th Life

Adam Rex
“They can't expect anyone to actually pay for a shirt that says, 'I (picture of an elephant) the San Diego Zoo.' What does that even mean?”
Adam Rex, Fat Vampire: A Never Coming of Age Story

Brandon Mull
“They would probably search for him all over the zoo—the last place he’d been seen. He wondered if any evidence would implicate the hippo.”
Brandon Mull, A World Without Heroes

Wendy Beck
“Zookeeper foible #1: Tendency to not equate fur and scale with fracture and scar.”
Wendy Beck, 9th Life

أنيس منصور
“إسرائيل أكبر حديقة حيوانات ناطقة في العالم كله”
أنيس منصور, شيء من الفكر
tags: israel, zoo

Sonya Hartnett
“Andrej thought about it - the notion that the
world was riddled with holes where certain people and animals were meant to be, but weren’t.”
Sonya Hartnett, The Midnight Zoo

“...a flabby lemon and pink giant, who hung his mouth open as though he were an animal at the zoo inviting buns--especially when the ladies were present. [on fellow Brit Ford Madox Ford]”
Percy Wyndham Lewis

Susan Block
“Mommy, Daddy, what are they doing?” a little girl asked, watching the bonobos play. Her forehead and palms were pressed against the glass, as if she thought she could break on through to the other side and join them if only she pushed hard enough.

“Looks like they need private time!” her father barked back, steering the girl away from the window as her mother brightly proposed, “Let’s go see the hippos!”

Not everybody is quite ready for the Bonobo Way, and far be it from me to push it on anyone, especially some stressed-out parents at the zoo.

On the other hand, maybe they’re more ready than they realize. Ready or not, its moment has come. The time is now for human beings to step up to the plate and protect our kissing cousins from extinction, as well as learn as much as we can from them about our noblest and kinkiest characteristics, our capacity for peace (even world peace) through pleasure, more satisfying relationships, better communication, hotter sex and deeper love.”
Susan Block, The Bonobo Way

Kim Harrison
“Newt turned back to me, her eyes black as the sun slipped away. From the slump of broken castle, a rock fell. “We exist in a zoo,” she said, chilling me. “You know that, yes? I hope our funding doesn’t run out. I’d give anything for a better enclosure, one that at least hides the bars.”
Kim Harrison, The Undead Pool
tags: zoo

Susan Block
“I squinted through the big window, a portal to another world, trying to get a better view of the primal love scene before us. All I could see was a mass of wriggling fur and finger-like toes until my eyes focused in on one male and two females kissing, ear-tonguing and giving each other enthusiastic oral sex, punctuated with occasional somersaults, smacks and nibbles on fruit and leaves. Sometimes they interacted as a threesome. Other times, two would cavort together, while the third played with herself, alternating between fingering and using a red rubber ball as a kind of sex toy, rubbing and bouncing it vigorously against her large pink vulva.”
Susan Block, The Bonobo Way

Mehmet Murat ildan
“Deer must be in the forest not in the zoo; monkey must be in the forest, not in the zoo; bear must be in the forest, not in the zoo! Animal prisons must be abolished!”
Mehmet Murat ildan
tags: zoo

Ernest Vincent Wright
“Now just a word about zoos. Many folks think that animals in a zoo know no comforts; nothing but constant fright from living in captivity. Such folks do not stop to think of a thing or two about an animal’s wild condition. Wild animals must not only constantly hunt for food, but invariably fight to kill it and to hold it, too; for, in such a fight, a big antagonist will naturally win from a small individual. Thus, what food is found, is also lost; and hunting must go on, day by day, or night by night until a tragic climax—by thirst or starvation. But in a zoo, food is brought daily, with facility for drinking, and laid right in front of hoofs, paws or bills. For small animals, roofs and thick walls ward off cold winds and rain; and so, days of calm inactivity, daily naps without worrying about attack; and a carting away of all rubbish and filth soon puts a zoo animal in bodily form which has no comparison with its wild condition. Lack of room in which to climb, roam or play, may bring a zoo animal to that condition known as “soft”; but, as it now has no call for vigor, and its fighting passions find no opportunity for display, such an animal is gradually approaching that condition which has brought Man, who is only an animal, anyway, to his lofty point in Natural History, today. Truly, with such tribulations, worry, and hard work as Man puts up with to obtain his food and lodging, a zoo animal, if it could only know of our daily grind, would comfortably yawn, thankful that Man is so kindly looking out for it. With similar animals all around it, and, day by day, just a happy growth from cub-hood to maturity, I almost wish that I was a zoo animal, with no boss to growl about my not showing up, mornings, at a customary hour!”
Ernest Vincent Wright, Gadsby

Haruki Murakami
“Still, though, I can't be sure if the zoo as I recall it was really like that. How can I put it? I sometimes feel that it's too vivid, if you know what I mean. And when I start having thoughts like this, the more I think about it, the less I can tell how much of the vividness is real and how much of it my imagination has invented. I feel as if I've wandered into a labyrinth. Has that ever happened to you?”
Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

“Ein Puff ist kein Streichelzoo, auch wenn das auf den ersten Blick so scheinen mag.”
Anna Basener, Als die Omma den Huren noch Taubensuppe kochte
tags: puff, zoo

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