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Quotes About Transcendentalism

Quotes tagged as "transcendentalism" (showing 1-18 of 19)
Ralph Waldo Emerson
“It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after our own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Complete Prose Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Men do what is called a good action, as some piece of courage or charity, much as they would pay a fine in expiation of daily non-appearance on parade. Their works are done as an apology or extenuation of their living in the world. I do not wish to expiate, but to live. My life is not an apology, but a life.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Self-Reliance

Margaret Fuller
“Very early, I knew that the only object in life was to grow.”
Margaret Fuller

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Science does not know its debt to imagination.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Not for nothing one face, one character, one fact makes much impression on him, and another none.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Self-Reliance

Henry David Thoreau
“This whole earth in which we inhabit is but a point is space.”
Henry David Thoreau

Clyde Dsouza
“Prayer… panacea for some, placebo to others. I thought of it as an epidural administered through the soul to anesthetize the mind.”
Clyde Dsouza, Memories With Maya

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“The poet is the sayer, the namer, and represents beauty. He is a sovereign, and stands on the centre. For the world is not painted, or adorned, but is from the beginning beautiful; and God has not made some beautiful things, but Beauty is the creator of the universe. Therefore the poet is not any permissive potentate, but is emperor in his own right. Criticism is infested with a cant of materialism, which assumes that manual skill and activity is the first merit of all men, and disparages such as say and do not, overlooking the fact, that some men, namely, poets, are natural sayers, sent into the world to the end of expression, and confounds them with those whose province is action, but who quit it to imitate the sayers. The poet does not wait for the hero or the sage, but, as they act and think primarily, so he writes primarily what will and must be spoken, reckoning the others, though primaries also, yet, in respect to him, secondaries and servants; as sitters or models in the studio of a painter, or as assistants who bring building materials to an architect.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays, Second Series

Henry David Thoreau
“I have heard of a man lost in the woods and dying of famine and exhaustion at the foot of a tree, whose loneliness was relieved by the grotesque visions with which, owing to bodily weakness, his diseased imagination surrounded him, and which he believed to be real. So also, owing to bodily and mental health and strength, we may be continually cheered by a like but more normal and natural society, and come to know that we are never alone.”
Henry David Thoreau

Amos Bronson Alcott
“All unrest is but the struggle of the soul to reassure herself of her inborn immortality.”
Amos Bronson Alcott

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“None believeth in the soul of man, but only in some man or person old and departed. Ah me! no man goeth alone. All men go in flocks to this saint or that poet, avoiding the God who seeth in secret. They cannot see in secret; they love to be blind in public. They think society is wiser than their soul, and know not that one soul, and their soul, is wiser than the whole world.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Let me admonish you, first of all, to go alone; to refuse the good models, even those most sacred in the imagination of men, and dare to love God without mediator or veil.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Divinity School Address

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Does not… the ear of Handel predict the witchcraft of harmonic sound?”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ashim Shanker
“Each form is inadequate, like a graft to be rejected by its intractable and unrelenting host and thus can only serve a brief and momentary purpose coherent to a context rooted in contiguous reason. This unbridled brash Spirit is, to itself, burdensome, yet dynamic, for it sees no flaw in working within the confines of a closed system to achieve ends that extend beyond it. This Spirit is, in fact, self-deceptive for to achieve such ends, it becomes necessary to bound manipulable fragments of the Self with a twine by which these parts can be joined indissolubly and maneuvered adroitly with the skill of a marionettist.”
Ashim Shanker, Don't Forget to Breathe

“[Transcendentalism maintains] that man has ideas, that come not through the five sense, or the powers of reasoning; but are either the result of direct revelation from God, his immediate inspiration, or his immanent presence in the spiritual world.”
Charles Mayo Ellis

G.K. Chesterton
“The one created thing which we cannot look at is the one thing in the light of which we look at everything. Like the sun at noonday, mysticism explains everything else by the blaze of its own victorious invisibility. Detached intellectualism is (in the exact sense of a popular phrase) all moonshine; for it is light without heat, and it is secondary light, reflected from a dead world. But the Greeks were right when they made Apollo the god both of imagination and of sanity; for he was both the patron of poetry and the patron of healing. Of necessary dogmas and a special creed I shall speak later. But that transcendentalism by which all men live has primarily much the position of the sun in the sky. We are conscious of it as of a kind of splendid confusion; it is something both shining and shapeless, at once a blaze and a blur. But the circle of the moon is as clear and unmistakable, as recurrent and inevitable, as the circle of Euclid on a blackboard. For the moon is utterly reasonable; and the moon is the mother of lunatics and has given to them all her name.”
G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

Henry David Thoreau
“What is a course of history, or philosophy, or poetry, no matter how well selected, or the best society, or the most admirable routine of life, compared with the discipline of looking always at what is to be seen?”
Henry David Thoreau, Walden

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