Quotes About Stewardship

Quotes tagged as "stewardship" (showing 1-30 of 104)
Pope John Paul II
“The earth will not continue to offer its harvest, except with faithful stewardship. We cannot say we love the land and then take steps to destroy it for use by future generations.”
Pope John Paul II

John Wesley
“Do you not know that God entrusted you with that money (all above what buys necessities for your families) to feed the hungry, to clothe the naked, to help the stranger, the widow, the fatherless; and, indeed, as far as it will go, to relieve the wants of all mankind? How can you, how dare you, defraud the Lord, by applying it to any other purpose?”
John Wesley

Stephen Jay Gould
“We have become, by the power of a glorious evolutionary accident called intelligence, the stewards of life's continuity on earth. We did not ask for this role, but we cannot abjure it. We may not be suited to it, but here we are.”
Stephen Jay Gould, The Flamingo's Smile: Reflections in Natural History

Wendell Berry
“No settled family or community has ever called its home place an “environment.” None has ever called its feeling for its home place “biocentric” or “anthropocentric.” None has ever thought of its connection to its home place as “ecological,” deep or shallow. The concepts and insights of the ecologists are of great usefulness in our predicament, and we can hardly escape the need to speak of “ecology” and “ecosystems.” But the terms themselves are culturally sterile. They come from the juiceless, abstract intellectuality of the universities which was invented to disconnect, displace, and disembody the mind. The real names of the environment are the names of rivers and river valleys; creeks, ridges, and mountains; towns and cities; lakes, woodlands, lanes roads, creatures, and people.

And the real name of our connection to this everywhere different and differently named earth is “work.” We are connected by work even to the places where we don’t work, for all places are connected; it is clear by now that we cannot exempt one place from our ruin of another. The name of our proper connection to the earth is “good work,” for good work involves much giving of honor. It honors the source of its materials; it honors the place where it is done; it honors the art by which it is done; it honors the thing that it makes and the user of the made thing. Good work is always modestly scaled, for it cannot ignore either the nature of individual places or the differences between places, and it always involves a sort of religious humility, for not everything is known. Good work can be defined only in particularity, for it must be defined a little differently for every one of the places and every one of the workers on the earth.

The name of our present society’s connection to the earth is “bad work” – work that is only generally and crudely defined, that enacts a dependence that is ill understood, that enacts no affection and gives no honor. Every one of us is to some extent guilty of this bad work. This guilt does not mean that we must indulge in a lot of breast-beating and confession; it means only that there is much good work to be done by every one of us and that we must begin to do it.”
Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry
“...the care of the earth is our most ancient and most worthy and, after all, our most pleasing responsibility. To cherish what remains of it, and to foster its renewal, is our only legitimate hope.”
Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays

Vera Nazarian
“The master of the garden is the one who waters it, trims the branches, plants the seeds, and pulls the weeds. If you merely stroll through the garden, you are but an acolyte.”
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

John Wesley
“When a man becomes a Christian, he becomes industrious, trustworthy and prosperous. Now, if that man when he gets all he can and saves all he can, does not give all he can, I have more hope for Judas Iscariot than for that man!”
John Wesley

Wendell Berry
“We do not need to plan or devise a "world of the future"; if we take care of the world of the present, the future will have received full justice from us. A good future is implicit in the soils, forests, grasslands, marshes, deserts, mountains, rivers, lakes, and oceans that we have now, and in the good things of human culture that we have now; the only valid "futurology" available to us is to take care of those things. We have no need to contrive and dabble at "the future of the human race"; we have the same pressing need that we have always had - to love, care for, and teach our children.
(pg. 73, "Feminism, the Body, and the Machine")”
Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays

Wendell Berry
“In the loss of skill, we lose stewardship; in losing stewardship we lose fellowship; we become outcasts from the great neighborhood of Creation. It is possible - as our experience in this good land shows - to exile ourselves from Creation, and to ally ourselves with the principle of destruction - which is, ultimately, the principle of nonentity. It is to be willing in general for being to not-be. And once we have allied ourselves with that principle, we are foolish to think that we can control the results. (pg. 303, The Gift of Good Land)”
Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays

Steve Goodier
“Money is not the only commodity that is fun to give. We can give time, we can give our expertise, we can give our love or simply give a smile. What does that cost? The point is, none of us can ever run out of something worthwhile to give.”
Steve Goodier

Marilynne Robinson
“Theologians talk about a prevenient grace that precedes grace itself and allows us to accept it. I think there must also be a prevenient courage that allows us to be brave - that is, to acknowledge that there is more beauty than our eyes can bear, that precious things have been put into our hands and to do nothing to honor them is to do great harm. And therefore, this courage allows us, as the old men said, to make ourselves useful. It allows us to be generous, which is another way of saying exactly the same thing.”
Marilynne Robinson, Gilead

Wendell Berry
“It is possible, I think, to say that... a Christian agriculture [is] formed upon the understanding that it is sinful for people to misuse or destroy what they did not make. The Creation is a unique, irreplaceable gift, therefore to be used with humility, respect, and skill.”
Wendell Berry, The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture

Edward Abbey
“Simply because humankind have the power now to meddle or 'manage' or 'exercise stewardship' in every nook and cranny of the world does not mean that we have a right to do so. Even less, the obligation.”
Edward Abbey, Postcards from Ed: Dispatches and Salvos from an American Iconoclast

J.R.R. Tolkien
“The rule of no realm is mine, neither of Gondor nor any other, great or small. But all worthy things that are in peril as the world now stands, those are my care. And for my part, I shall not wholly fail of my task, though Gondor should perish, if anything passes through this night that can still grow fair or bear fruit and flower again in days to come. For I also am a steward. Did you not know?”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

Shannon L. Alder
“When you care about the earth you resonate with it’s beauty and everything positive becomes the only way.”
Shannon L. Alder

“Charity fits the economy of scarcity, because it supports the blasphemous myth that the rich are rich because they deserve to be, and their riches are theirs to deal with as they please. With such charity, we are not worthy to tell the story of manna in the wilderness, to pretend to eat together at the Lord’s Supper, or claim the Year of Jubilee as our own.”
Michael Rhodes

Charles Haddon Spurgeon
“Be wise and attend to obeying. Let Christ manage the providing.”
Charles Haddon Spurgeon, Morning and Evening, Based on the English Standard Version

“Hoarding is both unnecessary and an affront to God, who is perfectly capable of providing abundantly for those who trust in him.”
Richard B. Hays, The Conversion of the Imagination: Paul as Interpreter of Israel's Scripture

Charles Haddon Spurgeon
“I love the quaint saying of a dying man, who exclaimed, "I have no fear of going home; I have sent all before me; God's finger is on the latch of my door, and I am ready for Him to enter.”
Charles Haddon Spurgeon, Morning and Evening, Based on the English Standard Version

Joshua Stannard
“You see, what we do with what He gives us determines how much more we will get.”
Joshua Stannard, How Good Can It Get

Geraldine Brooks
“David ran through concrete advantages. And then set aside the practical. The pragmatist was gone, replaced by the poet and mystic.”
Geraldine Brooks, The Secret Chord

Harold Bloom
“Capital is necessary to the cultivation of esthetic value.”
Harold Bloom, The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages

Philip Zaleski
“Recovery is the ability to see things with clarity, "freed from the drab blur of greatness or familiarity – from possessiveness.”
Philip Zaleski, The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings: J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Owen Barfield, Charles Williams

Barbara W. Tuchman
“A minister's (cabinet member's) function was not to DO the work but to see that it got done.”
Barbara W. Tuchman, The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

Beth Moore
“Only God can make the common sacred.”
Beth Moore, To Live Is Christ

“Don't sweat the small stuff" doesn't work with parenting small children. They only work in small stuff. They aren't making company decisions. They are deciding whether to use a crayon on the wall. – Bill Klein”
The Little Couple

Walter Isaacson
“Just because you can't act EVERYWHERE doesn't mean you don't act ANYWHERE. – Madeleine Albright”
Walter Isaacson, American Sketches: Great Leaders, Creative Thinkers, and Heroes of a Hurricane

“Lincoln bore down or anything he handled, mastering both the details and the principles.”
Richard Brookhiser, Founders' Son: A Life of Abraham Lincoln

“Whatever you do to the animals, you do to yourself.”
Ben Mikaelsen, Touching Spirit Bear

“A leader must be a good listener. He must be willing to take counsel. He must show a genuine concern and love for those under his stewardship.”
James Faust

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