Quotes About Rilke

Quotes tagged as "rilke" (showing 1-30 of 46)
Maggie Stiefvater
“Afterward, Isabel drove me home and I shut myself in the study with Rilke, and I read and I wanted.

And leaving you (there arent words to untangle it)
Your life, fearful and immense and blossoming,
So that, sometimes frustrated, and sometimes
understanding
Your life is sometimes a stone in you, and then, a star

I was beginning to undertand poetry.”
Maggie Stiefvater, Shiver

Rainer Maria Rilke
“She who reconciles the ill-matched threads
Of her life, and weaves them gratefully
Into a single cloth –
It’s she who drives the loudmouths from the hall
And clears it for a different celebration.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

Maggie Stiefvater
“And leaving you (there aren't words to untangle it)
Your life, fearful and immense and blossoming,
so that, sometimes frustrated, and sometimes understanding,
Your life is sometimes a stone in you, and then, a star.”
Maggie Stiefvater, Shiver

Gaston Bachelard
“Rilke wrote: 'These trees are magnificent, but even more magnificent is the sublime and moving space between them, as though with their growth it too increased.”
Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space

Maggie Stiefvater
“Again and Again, however, we know the language of love, and the little churchyard with its lamenting names and the staggeringly secret abyss in which others find their end: again and again the two of us go out under the ancient trees, make our bed again and again between the flowers, face to face with the skies”
Maggie Stiefvater, Shiver

Rainer Maria Rilke
“Whoever you are, go out into the evening,
leaving your room, of which you know every bit;
your house is the last before the infinite,
whoever you are.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

Rainer Maria Rilke
“Destiny itself is like a wonderful wide tapestry in which every thread is guided by an unspeakable tender hand, placed beside another thread and held and carried by a hundred others.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

Rainer Maria Rilke
“You, God, who live next door--

If at times, through the long night, I trouble you
with my urgent knocking--
this is why: I hear you breathe so seldom.
I know you're all alone in that room.
If you should be thirsty, there's no one
to get you a glass of water.
I wait listening, always. Just give me a sign!
I'm right here...

Sen komşu tanrı,
Uzun geceler bazen,
Kapına vura vura uyandırıyorsam seni
Solumanı seyrek duyduğumdandır...
Bilirim, yalnızsın odanda.
Sana birşey gerekse kimse yok,
Bir yudum su versin aradığında.
Hep dinlerim, yeter ki bir ses edin,
Öyle yakınım sana...”
Rainer Maria Rilke, Rilke's Book of Hours: Love Poems to God

William H. Gass
“As Borges has taught us, all the books in the library are contemporary. Great poems are like granaries: they are always ready to enlarge their store.”
William H. Gass, Reading Rilke: Reflections on the Problems of Translation

Rainer Maria Rilke
“Live the questions now. Perhaps then, someday far in the future, you will gradually, without even noticing it, live your way into the answer.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

Rainer Maria Rilke
“How they are all about, these gentlemen
In chamberlains' apparel, stocked and laced,
Like night around their order's star and gem
And growing ever darker, stony-faced,
And these, their ladies, fragile, wan, but propped
High by their bodice, one hand loosely dropped,
Small like its collar, on the toy King-Charles:
How they surround each one of these who stopped
To read and contemplate the objects d'art,
Of which some pieces still are theirs, not ours.

Whit exquisite decorum they allow us
A life of whose dimensions we seem sure
And which they cannot grasp. They were alive
To bloom, that is be fair; we, to mature,
That is to be of darkness and to strive.”
Rainer Maria Rilke, The Best of Rilke: 72 Form-true Verse Translations with Facing Originals, Commentary & Compact Biography

Rainer Maria Rilke
“Loving isn't merging, surrendering, uniting with the other. Rather, it's a kind of solitude; of profound aloneness. It induces you to mature and become whole for the sake of your beloved ... to truly love another, you must first wholly love yourself. Love therefore exacts the most demanding claim of all; it both chooses you and pursues you, and reaches out, as if over vast distances, to call and draw you into your now and future self."
-- John VanDyke Wilmerding, ideas put forth inspired by ('after') Rainer Maria Rilke's 'Letters to a Young Poet”
Rainer Maria Rilke

Peter Sloterdijk
“What appears in the former statue of Apollo, however, cannot simply be equated with the Olympian of the same name, who had to ensure light, contours, foreknowledge and security of form in his days of completeness. Rather, as the poem's title implies, he stands for something much older, something rising from prehistoric sources. He symbolizes a divine magma in which something of the first ordering force, as old as the world itself, becomes manifest. There is no doubt that memories of Rodin and his cyclopian work ethic had an effect on Rilke here. During his work with the great artist, he experienced what it means to work on the surfaces of bodies until they are nothing but a fabric of carefully shaped, luminous, almost seeing 'places'. A few years earlier, he had written of Rodin's sculptures that 'there were endless places, and none of them did not have something happening in them'. Each place is a point at which Apollo, the god of forms and surfaces, makes a visually intense and haptically palpable compromise with his older opponent Dionysus, the god of urges and currents. That this energized Apollo embodies a manifestation of Dionysus is indicated by the statement that the stone glistens 'like wild beasts' fur'.”
Peter Sloterdijk, Du mußt dein Leben ändern

Peter Sloterdijk
“In the midst of the ubiquitous dealings with prostituted signs, the thing-poem was capable of opening up the prospect of returning to credible experiences of meaning. It did this by tying language to the gold standard of what things themselves communicate. Where randomness is disabled, authority should shine forth.”
Peter Sloterdijk, Du mußt dein Leben ändern

Peter Sloterdijk
“As we know, Rilke, under the influence of Auguste Rodin, whom he had assisted between 1905 and 1906 in Meudon as a private secretary, turned away from the art nouveau-like, sensitized-atmospheric poetic approach of his early years to pursue a view of art determined more strongly by the priority of the object. The proto-modern pathos of making way for the object without depicting it in a manner 'true to nature', like that of the old masters, led in Rilke's case to the concept of the thing-poem - and thus to a temporarily convincing new answer to the question of the source of aesthetic and ethical authority. From that point, it would be the things themselves from which all authority would come - or rather: from this respectively current singular thing that turns to me by demanding my full gaze. This is only possible because thing-being would now no longer mean anything but this: having something to say.”
Peter Sloterdijk, Du mußt dein Leben ändern

Rainer Maria Rilke
“After Rilke's Letters
-- by John VanDyke Wilmerding II

this is my letter to a young person
poet you may be, but yet not know it
love is life’s great end, its final purpose
that for which all other tests prepare us
love is not to merge, nor to surrender
yet leads into solitude most tender
alone, into wholeness, one is called
before contemplating how one might wed
that your other might not lack your loving
owing to you finding yourself wanting
however far you are from who you are
that’s the distance you’ll travel for true love
be patient and wait on your completeness
only then can grow your full tenderness
be yourself, and you become another
enhancing your one beloved other

-- original poem written May 27, 2015,'after' Rainer Maria Rilke's 'Letters to a Young Poet”
Rainer Maria Rilke

Peter Sloterdijk
“What the poet has to say to the torso of the supposed Apollo, however, is more than a note on an excursion to the antiquities collection. The author's point is not that the thing depicts an extinct god who might be of interest to the humanistically educated, but that the god in the stone constitutes a thing-construct that is still on air. We are dealing with a document of how newer message ontology outgrew traditional theologies. Here, being itself is understood as having more power to speak and transmit, and more potent authority, than God, the ruling idol of religions. In modern times, even a God can find himself among the pretty figures that no longer mean anything to us - assuming they do not become openly irksome. The thing filled with being, however, does not cease to speak to us when its moment has come.”
Peter Sloterdijk, Du mußt dein Leben ändern

Peter Sloterdijk
“The reason for the existence of the perfection conjured up in these fourteen lines is that it possesses ... the authorization to form a message that appeals from within itself. This power of appeal is exquisitely evident in the object evoked here. The perfect thing is that which articulates an entire principle of being. The poem has to perform no more and no less than to perceive the principle of being in the thing and adapt it to its own existence - with the aim of becoming a construct with an equal power to convey a message.”
Peter Sloterdijk, Du mußt dein Leben ändern

Rainer Maria Rilke
“Ninguém o pode aconselhar ou ajudar, — ninguém.
Não há senão um caminho. Procure entrar em si mesmo. Investigue o motivo que o manda escrever; examine se estende suas raízes pelos recantos mais profundos de sua alma; confesse a si mesmo: morreria, se lhe fosse vedado escrever? Isto acima de tudo: pergunte a si mesmo na hora mais tranqüila de sua noite: "Sou mesmo forçado a escrever?” Escave dentro de si uma resposta profunda. Se for afirmativa, se puder contestar àquela pergunta severa por um forte e simples "sou", então construa a sua vida de acordo com esta necessidade. Sua vida, até em sua hora mais indiferente e anódina, deverá tornar-se o sinal e o testemunho de tal pressão”
Rainer Maria Rilke, Cartas a Um Jovem Poeta

Rainer Maria Rilke
“think: the hero prolongs himself, even his falling
was only a pretext for being, his latest rebirth.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

William H. Gass
“...until summer becomes ein Zimmer in einem Traum -- a room in a dream.”
William H. Gass, Reading Rilke: Reflections on the Problems of Translation

Peter Sloterdijk
“This gesture is one of the motifs of modernity's turn against the principle of imitating nature, that is to say, imitating predefined morphological expectations. It is still capable of perceiving message-totalities and autonomous thing-signals when no morphologically intact figures are left - indeed, precisely then. The sense for perfection withdraws from the forms of nature - probably because nature itself is in the process of losing its ontological authority. The popularization of photography also increasingly devalues the standard views of things. As the first edition of the visible, nature comes into discredit. It can no longer assert its authority as the sender of binding messages - for reasons that ultimately come from its disenchantment through being scientifically explored and technically outdone. After this shift, 'being perfect' takes on an altered meaning: it means having something to say that is more meaningful than the chatter of conventional totalities. Now the torsos and their ilk have their turn: the hour of those forms that do not remind us of anything has come. Fragments, cripples and hybrids formulate something that cannot be conveyed by the common whole forms and happy integrities; intensity beats standard perfection.”
Peter Sloterdijk, Du mußt dein Leben ändern

Gilberto Forti
“Credo che Dio mi abbia dimenticato dentro qualche fessura del suo mondo.
Egli è libero di dimenticarmi, e forse è quello che mi sta accadendo. (R. M. Rilke)”
Gilberto Forti, Il piccolo almanacco di Radetzky
tags: rilke

Gilberto Forti
“Io sono come una bandiera, avvolta da remote distanze. Ho il presagio dei venti che si levano, e li devo vivere ad uno ad uno, mentre ancora le cose sottostanti sono immobili: si chiudono ancora dolcemente le porte, e nelle gole dei camini è quiete; e ancora non tremano i vetri, e la polvere è ancora greve.
Io, intanto, io so già le tempeste e sono agitato come il mare.
E mi dispiego e ricado in me e mi rovescio, e sono tutto solo nella grande bufera (R. M. Rilke).”
Gilberto Forti, Il piccolo almanacco di Radetzky
tags: rilke

Rainer Maria Rilke
“Lauschende Wolke über dem Wald.
Wie wir sie lieben lernten,
seit wir wissen, wie wunderbald
sie als weckender Regen prallt
an die träumenden Ernten.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

Peter Sloterdijk
“I receive the reward for my willingness to participate in the object-subject reversal in the form of a private illumination - in the present case, as an aesthetic movedness. The torso, which has no place that does not see me, likewise does not impose itself - it exposes itself. It exposes itself by testing whether I will recognize it as a seer. Acknowledging it as a seer essentially means 'believing' in it, where believing, as noted above, refers to the inner operations that are necessary to conceive of the vital principle in the stone as a sender of discrete addressed energies. If I somehow succeed in this, I am also able to take the glow of subjectivity away from the stone. I tentatively accept the way it stands there in exemplary radiance, and receive the starlike eruption of its surplus of authority and soul.”
Peter Sloterdijk, Du mußt dein Leben ändern

Rainer Maria Rilke
“If you think your world isn’t poetic enough, or exciting enough to tell a story about, that’s not because it’s a dull world, that’s because you’re not poet enough to wake its soul up.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

Peter Sloterdijk
“We know from accounts of Rilke's life that his stay in Rodin's workshops taught him how modern sculpture had advanced to the genre of the autonomous torso. The poet's view of the mutilated body thus has nothing to do with the previous century's Romanticism of fragments and ruins; it is part of the breakthrough in modern art to the concept of the object that states itself with authority and the body that publicizes itself with authorization.”
Peter Sloterdijk, Du mußt dein Leben ändern

Peter Sloterdijk
“It is clear enough that not every something can be elevated to the rank of a thing - otherwise everything and everyone would be speaking once more, and the chatter would spread from humans to things. Rilke privileges two categories of 'entities' [Seienden), to express it in the papery diction of philosophy, that are eligible for the lofty task of acting as message-things - artifices and living creatures - with the latter gaining their particular quality from the former, as if animals were being's highest works of art before humans. Inherent to both is a message energy that does not activate itself, but requires the poet as a decoder and messenger.”
Peter Sloterdijk

Rainer Maria Rilke
“Liebe ist schwer. Liebhaben von Mensch zu Mensch: das ist vielleicht das Schwerste, was uns aufgegeben ist, das Äußerste, die letzte Probe und Prüfung.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

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