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Quotes About Reading

Quotes tagged as "reading" (showing 781-810 of 3,000)
Maud Hart Lovelace
“Betsy returned to her chair, took off her coat and hat, opened her book and forgot the world again.”
Maud Hart Lovelace, Betsy and Tacy Go Downtown

Anne Bishop
“We know how it ends practically before it starts. That's why stories appeal to us. They give us the clarity and simplicity our real lives lack.”
Anne Bishop, Daughter of the Blood

John Green
“I bet if you look at the average teenager and the average adult, the average teenager has read more books in the last year than the average adult. Now of course the adult would be all like, 'I'm busy, I got a job, I got stuff to do.' WHATEVER! READ! I mean, you're watching CSI: Miami. Why would you be watching CSI: Miami, when you could be READING CSI: Miami, the novelization?”
John Green

W.H. Auden
“A child's reading is guided by pleasure, but his pleasure is undifferentiated; he cannot distinguish, for example, between aesthetic pleasure and the pleasures of learning or daydreaming. In adolescence we realize that there are different kinds of pleasure, some of which cannot be enjoyed simultaneously, but we need help from others in defining them. Whether it be a matter of taste in food or taste in literature, the adolescent looks for a mentor in whose authority he can believe. He eats or reads what his mentor recommends and, inevitably, there are occasions when he has to deceive himself a little; he has to pretend that he enjoys olives or War and Peace a little more than he actually does. Between the ages of twenty and forty we are engaged in the process of discovering who we are, which involves learning the difference between accidental limitations which it is our duty to outgrow and the necessary limitations of our nature beyond which we cannot trespass with impunity. Few of us can learn this without making mistakes, without trying to become a little more of a universal man than we are permitted to be. It is during this period that a writer can most easily be led astray by another writer or by some ideology. When someone between twenty and forty says, apropos of a work of art, 'I know what I like,'he is really saying 'I have no taste of my own but accept the taste of my cultural milieu', because, between twenty and forty, the surest sign that a man has a genuine taste of his own is that he is uncertain of it. After forty, if we have not lost our authentic selves altogether, pleasure can again become what it was when we were children, the proper guide to what we should read.”
W.H. Auden, The Dyer's Hand

Virginia Woolf
“Few people ask from books what books can give us. Most commonly we come to books with blurred and divided minds, asking of fiction that it shall be true, of poetry that it shall be false, of biography that it shall be flattering, of history that it shall enforce our own prejudices. If we could banish all such preconceptions when we read, that would be an admirable beginning.”
Virginia Woolf, The Second Common Reader

Billy Collins
“I see all of us reading ourselves away from ourselves,
straining in circles of light to find more light
until the line of words becomes a trail of crumbs
that we follow across a page of fresh snow”
Billy Collins, Sailing Alone Around the Room: New and Selected Poems

Anne Frank
“This week I've been reading a lot and doing little work. That's the way things ought to be. That's surely the road to success.”
Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl

David Foster Wallace
“I read,' I say. 'I study and read. I bet I've read everything you've read. Don't think I haven't. I consume libraries. I wear out spines and ROM drives. I do things like get in a taxi and say, "The library, and step on it.”
David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest

Laura Whitcomb
“He kissed me for a long moment, holding my shoulders, perhaps to keep me from pressing my whole body against his. Then he tried to lift my bag.

"My God," he said. "What happened?"

"I found out one may check out twenty books at a time from the school library.”
Laura Whitcomb, A Certain Slant of Light

Rikki Ducornet
“What are books but tangible dreams? What is reading if it is not dreaming? The best books cause us to dream; the rest are not worth reading.”
Rikki Ducornet, The Fan-Maker's Inquisition: A Novel of the Marquis de Sade

Francis Bacon
“Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.”
Francis Bacon

Romain Rolland
“The greatest book is not the one whose message engraves itself on the brain, as a telegraphic message engraves itself on the ticker-tape, but the one whose vital impact opens up other viewpoints, and from writer to reader spreads the fire that is fed by the various essences, until it becomes a vast conflagration leaping from forest to forest.”
Romain Rolland

Gary Shteyngart
“Reading is entering into the consciousness of another human being.”
Gary Shteyngart

Samuel Butler
“The oldest books are still only just out to those who have not read them.”
Samuel Butler

Pat Conroy
“A library could show you everything if you knew where to look.”
Pat Conroy, My Reading Life

Wilkie Collins
“The books—the generous friends who met me without suspicion—the merciful masters who never used me ill! The only years of my life that I can look back on with something like pride... Early and late, through the long winter nights and the quiet summer days, I drank at the fountain of knowledge, and never wearied of the draught.”
Wilkie Collins, Armadale

Eudora Welty
“I wanted to read immediately. The only fear was that of books coming to an end.”
Eudora Welty

Jonathan Franzen
“Reading enables me to maintain a sense of something substantive– my ethical integrity, my intellectual integrity.”
Jonathan Franzen, How to Be Alone

Laura Miller
“If you've ever read one of those articles that asks notable people to list their favorite books, you may have been impressed or daunted to see them pick Proust or Thomas Mann or James Joyce. You might even feel sheepish about the fact that you reread Pride and Prejudice or The Lord of the Rings, or The Catcher in the Rye or Gone With the Wind every couple of years with some much pleasure. Perhaps, like me, you're even a little suspicious of their claims, because we all know that the books we've loved best are seldom the ones we esteem the most highly - or the ones we'd most like other people to think we read over and over again.”
Laura Miller, The Magician's Book: A Skeptic's Adventures in Narnia

Lemony Snicket
“Just knowing that they could read made the Baudelaire orphans feel as if their wretched lives could be a little brighter.”
Lemony Snicket, The Miserable Mill

Henry Miller
“He is trying to recapture his innocence, yet all he succeeds in doing (by writing) is to inoculate the world with a virus of his disillusionment.”
Henry Miller

Marcel Proust
“The novelist’s happy discovery was to think of substituting for those opaque sections, impenetrable by the human spirit, their equivalent in immaterial sections, things, that is, which the spirit can assimilate to itself. After which it matters not that the actions, the feelings of this new order of creatures appear to us in the guise of truth, since we have made them our own, since it is in ourselves that they are happening, that they are holding in thrall, while we turn over, feverishly, the pages of the book, our quickened breath and staring eyes. And once the novelist has brought us to that state, in which, as in all purely mental states, every emotion is multiplied ten-fold, into which his book comes to disturb us as might a dream, but a dream more lucid, and of a more lasting impression than those which come to us in sleep; why, then, for the space of an hour he sets free within us all the joys and sorrows in the world, a few of which, only, we should have to spend years of our actual life in getting to know, and the keenest, the most intense of which would never have been revealed to us because the slow course of their development stops our perception of them.”
Marcel Proust, Swann's Way

Richard Flanagan
“A good book, he had concluded, leaves you wanting to reread the book. A great book compels you to reread your own soul. Such books were for him rare and, as he aged, rarer. Still he searched, one more Ithaca for which he was forever bound.”
Richard Flanagan, The Narrow Road to the Deep North

Anne Fadiman
“Reading aloud means no skipping, no skimming, no cutting to the chase.”
Anne Fadiman, Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader

Clifton Fadiman
“Reading to small children is a specialty.”
Clifton Fadiman, Clifton Fadiman's Fireside Reader

Alberto Manguel
“All these are readers, and their gestures, their craft, the pleasure, the responsibility and the power they derive from reading, are common with mine. I am not alone.”
Alberto Manguel, A History of Reading

Nick Hornby
“I'm never going to complain about receiving free early copies of books, because clearly there's nothing to complain about, but it does introduce a rogue element into one's otherwise carefully plotted reading schedule. ...

Being a reader is sort of like being president, except reading involves fewer state dinners, usually. You have this agenda you want to get through, but you get distracted by life events, e.g., books arriving in the mail/World War III, and you are temporarly deflected from your chosen path. ”
Nick Hornby, The Polysyllabic Spree

Desiderius Erasmus
“Before you sleep, read something that is exquisite, and worth remembering.”
Desiderius Erasmus

W. Somerset Maugham
“He began to read at haphazard. He entered upon each system with a little thrill of excitement, expecting to find in each some guide by which he could rule his conduct; he felt himself like a traveller in unknown countries and as he pushed forward the enterprise fascinated him; he read emotionally, as other men read pure literature, and his heart leaped as he discovered in noble words what himself had obscurely felt.”
W. Somerset Maugham, Of Human Bondage

“Never read a book through merely because you have begun it.”
John Witherspoon

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