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Quotes About Race Relations

Quotes tagged as "race-relations" (showing 1-30 of 78)
Martin Luther King Jr.
“I have a dream that one day little black boys and girls will be holding hands with little white boys and girls.”
Martin Luther King Jr., I Have A Dream

Malcolm X
“It's just like when you've got some coffee that's too black, which means it's too strong. What do you do? You integrate it with cream, you make it weak. But if you pour too much cream in it, you won't even know you ever had coffee. It used to be hot, it becomes cool. It used to be strong, it becomes weak. It used to wake you up, now it puts you to sleep.”
Malcolm X

Kathryn Stockett
“We are just two people. Not that much separates us. Not nearly as much as I'd thought.”
Kathryn Stockett, The Help

Audre Lorde
“Black and Third World people are expected to educate white people as to our humanity. Women are expected to educate men. Lesbians and gay men are expected to educate the heterosexual world. The oppressors maintain their position and evade their responsibility for their own actions. There is a constant drain of energy which might be better used in redefining ourselves and devising realistic scenarios for altering the present and constructing the future.”
Audre Lorde, Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches

Ikkyu
“sick of it whatever it's called sick of the names
I dedicate every pore to what's here”
Ikkyu

Rebecca Skloot
“When he asked if she was okay, her eyes welled with tears and she said, “Like I’m always telling my brothers, if you gonna go into history, you can’t do it with a hate attitude. You got to remember, times was different.”
Rebecca Skloot, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Cornel West
“Without the presence of black people in America, European-Americans would not be "white"-- they would be Irish, Italians, Poles, Welsh, and other engaged in class, ethnic, and gender struggles over resources and identity. (p. 107-108)”
Cornel West, Race Matters

Isabel Wilkerson
“Our Negro problem, therefore, is not of the Negro's making. No group in our population is less responsible for its existence. But every group is responsible for its continuance.... Both races need to understand that their rights and duties are mutual and equal and their interests in the common good are idential.... There is no help or healing in apparaising past responsibilities or in present apportioning of praise or blame. The past is of value only as it aids in understanding the present; and an understanding of the facts of the problem--a magnanimous understanding by both races--is the first step toward its solution.”
Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

Barack Obama
“The emotions between the races could never be pure; even love was tarnished by the desire to find in the other some element that was missing in ourselves. Whether we sought out our demons or salvation, the other race would always remain just that: menacing, alien, and apart.”
Barack Obama, Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

Kay Redfield Jamison
“As best I could make out, having never heard the term until I arrived in California, being a WASP meant being mossbacked, lockjawed, rigid, humorless, cold, charmless, insipid, less than penetratingly bright, but otherwise---and inexplicably---to be envied.”
Kay Redfield Jamison, An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness

David Mutti Clark
“And here's to the blues, the real blues— where there's a hint of hope in every cry of desperation.”
David Mutti Clark, Professor Brown Shoes Teaches the Blues

Clotye Murdock Larsson
“Intermarriage is one of the most provocative words in the English language”
Clotye Murdock Larsson, Marriage Across the Color Line

Mao Tse-tung
“Under the white population of the United States of America only the reactionary classes oppres the black population. Under no circumstance can they represent the workers, farmers and revolutionary intellectuals and other enlighted people who form the majority of the white population.”
Mao Tse-tung, Quotations From Chairman Mao Tse-Tung

Tom Robbins
“White folks have controlled New Orleans with money and guns, black folks have controlled it with magic and music, and although there has been a steady undercurrent of mutual admiration, an intermingling of cultures unheard of in any other American city, South or North; although there has prevailed a most joyous and fascinating interface, black anger and white fear has persisted, providing the ongoing, ostensibly integrated fete champetre with volatile and sometimes violent idiosyncrasies.”
Tom Robbins, Jitterbug Perfume

Kathryn Stockett
“By the time she a year old Mae Mobley following me around everwhere I go….Miss Leefolt, she’d narrow up her eyes at me like I done something wrong, unhitch that crying baby off my foot. I reckon that’s the risk you run, letting somebody else raise you chilluns”
Kathryn Stockett, The Help

Luis Quiros
“It was around this time that I started thinking about how skin color defined class. The cowboy movies that fueled the goodness of ‘White’ reinforced attaching ‘darkness’ to a class. I finally took notice that the crayon color called ‘flesh’ did not match mine.”
Luis Quiros, An Other's Mind

Timothy B. Tyson
“Anyone intent on moral clarity might want to find another book and, in fact, might not want to go anywhere near the enduring chasm of race in the United States.”
Timothy B. Tyson, Blood Done Sign My Name: A True Story

Elle Thornton
“I'm too old to be ignorant as I am."
--Twelve-year-old Gabriella to the general, who does not want her to know about Emmett Till and the world's brutality.”
Elle Thornton, The Girl Who Swam to Atlantis

W.E.B. Du Bois
“It is not enough for the Negroes to declare that color-prejudice is the sole cause of their social condition, nor for the white South to reply that their social condition is the main cause of prejudice. They both act as reciprocal cause and effect, and a change in neither alone will bring the desired effect. Both must change, or neither can improve to any great extent."(p.88)...."Only by a union of intelligence and sympathy across the color-line in this critical period of the Republic shall justice and right triumph,”
W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk

Joseph Conrad
“He seemed to hasten the retreat of departing light by his very presence; the setting sun dipped sharply, as though fleeing before our nigger; a black mist emanated from him; a subtle and dismal influence; a something cold and gloomy that floated out and settled on all the faces like a mourning veil. The circle broke up. The joy of laughter died on stiffened lips.”
Joseph Conrad, The Nigger of the Narcissus

“Don't Tase Me Bro!
If I'm a cop, and I'm a brotha, and they let me have a taser? Sorry bro, I'm tasing you.”
Larry Wilmore, I'd Rather We Got Casinos: And Other Black Thoughts

Shannon Celebi
“She didn't tell him white folks couldn't love the same as coloreds. She couldn't love the same neither though, cuz more than half of her was white.”
Shannon Celebi, Papa Was A Gypsy

Jon Stewart
“Race is there. You're tire of hearing about it? Imagine how fucking exhausting it is living it.”
Jon Stewart

Allan Dare Pearce
“My daughter is black and she has to know what it is like to be black. My daughter should know you, Aiken, but she should learn what it means to be black, and you cannot teach her that.”
Allan Dare Pearce, Paris in April

DaShanne Stokes
“Racism hurts everyone, including racists themselves.”
DaShanne Stokes

Oscar Wilde
“There is nothing like race, is there?”
Oscar Wilde, An Ideal Husband

James Baldwin
“There appears to be a vast amount of confusion on this point, but I do not know many Negroes who are eager to be "accepted" by white people, still less to be loved by them; they, the blacks, simply don't wish to be beaten over the head by the whites every instant of our brief passage on this planet.”
James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time

W.E.B. Du Bois
“Today even the attitude of the Southern whites toward the blacks is not, as so many assume, in all cases the same; the ignorant Southerner hates the Negro, the workingmen fear his competition, the money-makers wish to use him as a laborer, some of the educated see a menace in his upward development, while others—usually the sons of the masters—wish to help him to rise.”
W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk

W.E.B. Du Bois
“Now it happens that both master and man have just enough argument on their respective sides to make it difficult for them to understand each other. The Negro dimly personifies in the white man all his ills and misfortunes; if he is poor, it is because the white man seizes the fruit of his toil; if he is ignorant, it is because the white man gives him neither time nor facilities to learn; and, indeed, if any misfortune happens to him, it is because of some hidden machinations of "white folks." On the other hand, the masters and the masters' sons have never been able to see why the Negro, instead of settling down to be day-laborers for bread and clothes, are infected with a silly desire to rise in the world, and why they are sulky, dissatisfied, and careless, where their fathers were happy and dumb and faithful.”
W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk

W.E.B. Du Bois
“Deception is the natural defence of the weak against the strong, and the South used it for many years against its conquerors; to-day it must be prepared to see its black proletariat turn that same two-edged weapon against itself. And how natural this is! The death of Denmark Vesey and Nat Turner proved long since to the Negro the present hopelessness of physical defence. Political defence is becoming less and less available, and economic defence is still only partially effective. But there is a patent defence at hand,—the defence of deception and flattery, of cajoling and lying. It is the same defence which peasants of the Middle Age used and which left its stamp on their character for centuries. To-day the young Negro of the South who would succeed cannot be frank and outspoken, honest and self-assertive, but rather he is daily tempted to be silent and wary, politic and sly; he must flatter and be pleasant, endure petty insults with a smile, shut his eyes to wrong; in too many cases he sees positive personal advantage in deception and lying. His real thoughts, his real aspirations, must be guarded in whispers; he must not criticise, he must not complain. Patience, humility, and adroitness must, in these growing black youth, replace impulse, manliness, and courage. With this sacrifice there is an economic opening, and perhaps peace and some prosperity. Without this there is riot, migration, or crime. Nor is this situation peculiar to the Southern United States, is it not rather the only method by which undeveloped races have gained the right to share modern culture? The price of culture is a Lie.”
W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk

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