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Quotes About Public Speaking

Quotes tagged as "public-speaking" (showing 1-30 of 51)
Winston Churchill
“If you have an important point to make, don't try to be subtle or clever. Use a pile driver. Hit the point once. Then come back and hit it again. Then hit it a third time - a tremendous whack.”
Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill
“A good speech should be like a woman's skirt; long enough to cover the subject and short enough to create interest.”
Winston Churchill

Jarod Kintz
“99% of the population is afraid of public speaking, and of the remaining 1%, 99% of them have nothing original and interesting to say.”
Jarod Kintz, $3.33

Paul Arden
“Too many people spend too much time trying to perfect something before they actually do it. Instead of waiting for perfection, run with what you go, and fix it along the way…”
Paul Arden

Ashley Ormon
“Honestly, if everyone likes what you say something is wrong with your message.”
Ashley Ormon

Dale Carnegie
“Students of public speaking continually ask, "How can I overcome
self-consciousness and the fear that paralyzes me before an
audience?"
Did you ever notice in looking from a train window that some
horses feed near the track and never even pause to look up at the
thundering cars, while just ahead at the next railroad crossing a
farmer's wife will be nervously trying to quiet her scared horse as
the train goes by?
How would you cure a horse that is afraid of cars—graze him in a
back-woods lot where he would never see steam-engines or
automobiles, or drive or pasture him where he would frequently see
the machines?
Apply horse-sense to ridding yourself of self-consciousness and
fear: face an audience as frequently as you can, and you will soon stop shying. You can never attain
freedom from stage-fright by reading a treatise. A book may give
you excellent suggestions on how best to conduct yourself in the
water, but sooner or later you must get wet, perhaps even strangle
and be "half scared to death." There are a great many "wetless"
bathing suits worn at the seashore, but no one ever learns to swim
in them. To plunge is the only way.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking

Stephen Keague
“No audience ever complained about a presentation or speech being too short”
Stephen Keague, The Little Red Handbook of Public Speaking and Presenting

“It's much easier to be convincing if you care about your topic. Figure out what's important to you about your message and speak from the heart.”
Nicholas Boothman, Convince Them in 90 Seconds or Less: Make Instant Connections That Pay Off in Business and in Life

Stephen Keague
“The audience are likely to remember only three things from your presentation or speech”
Stephen Keague, The Little Red Handbook of Public Speaking and Presenting

“The customer is always right' may have become a standard motto in the world of business, but the idea that 'the audience is always right,' has yet to make much of an impression on the world of presentation, even though for the duration of the presentation at least, the audience is the speaker's only customer.”
Max Atkinson, Lend Me Your Ears: All You Need to Know about Making Speeches and Presentations

Dale Carnegie
“Blacksmiths sometimes twist a rope tight around the nose of a horse, and by thus inflicting a little pain they distract his attention from the shoeing process. One way to get air out of a
glass is to pour in water. Be Absorbed by Your Subject”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking

“A speaker should approach his preparation not by what he wants to say, but by what he wants to learn.”
Todd Stocker

Slavoj Žižek
“€7,500, first-class, everything—and all that for 40 minutes selling them some old stuff.”
Slavoj Žižek

Dale Carnegie
“The first
sign of greatness is when a man does not attempt to look and act
great. Before you can call yourself a man at all, Kipling assures
us, you must "not look too good nor talk too wise.”
Dale Carnegie, The Art of Public Speaking

“There is a strange sensation often experienced in the presence
of an audience. It may proceed from the gaze of the many eyes that
turn upon the speaker, especially if he permits himself to steadily
return that gaze. Most speakers have been conscious of this in a
nameless thrill, a real something, pervading the atmosphere,
tangible, evanescent, indescribable. All writers have borne
testimony to the power of a speaker's eye in impressing an
audience. This influence which we are now considering is the
reverse of that picture—the power their eyes may
exert upon him, especially before he begins to speak: after the
inward fires of oratory are fanned into flame the eyes of the
audience lose all terror.”
William Pittenger, Extempore Speech: How to Acquire and Practice It

Jarod Kintz
“The institution asked me to speak and say a few words. So, knowing a few is three, I said, I love you.”
Jarod Kintz, Love quotes for the ages. Specifically ages 18-81.

Hilary Mantel
“Fabre stood up. He placed his fingertips on d‘Anton’s temples. “Put your fingers here,” he said. “Feel the resonance. Put them here, and here.” He jabbed at d’Anton’s face: below the cheekbones, at the side of his jaw. “I’ll teach you like an actor,” he said. “This city is our stage.”
Camille said: “Book of Ezekiel. ‘This city is the cauldron, and we the flesh’ ...”
Fabre turned. “This stutter,” he said. “You don’t have to do it.” Camille put his hands over his eyes. “Leave me alone,” he said. “Even you.” Fabre’s face was incandescent. “Even you, I am going to teach.” He leapt forward, wrenched Camille upright in his chair. He took him by the shoulders and shook him. “You’re going to talk properly,” Fabre said. “Even if it kills one of us.” Camille put his hands protectively over his head. Fabre continued to perpetrate violence; d’Anton was too tired to intervene.”
Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety

Aristotle
“It is this simplicity that makes the uneducated more effective than the educated when addressing popular audiences—makes them, as the poets tell us, 'charm the crowd's ears more finely.' Educated men lay down broad general principles; uneducated men argue from common knowledge and draw obvious conclusions.”
Aristotle, The Rhetoric & The Poetics of Aristotle

“Just as you can’t rehearse your way to success, you can’t design your way there either.”
Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger

Aristotle
“Even hackneyed and commonplace maxims are to be used, if they suit one's purpose: just because they are commonplace, every one seems to agree with them, and therefore they are taken for truth.”
Aristotle, The Rhetoric & The Poetics of Aristotle

Aristotle
“These are the three things—volume of sound, modulation of pitch, and rhythm—that a speaker bears in mind. It is those who do bear them in mind who usually win prizes in the dramatic contests; and just as in drama the actors now count for more than the poets, so it is in the contests of public life, owing to the defects of our political institutions.”
Aristotle, The Rhetoric & The Poetics of Aristotle

“Well-designed visuals do more than provide information; they bring order to the conversation.”
Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger

“During the first few minutes of your presentation, your job is to assure the audience members that you are not going to waste their time and attention.”
Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger

Israelmore Ayivor
“Good communication has just a little to do with eloquence. It's character that makes it more successful. Harsh words nicely articulated are sharp enough to kill your brand!”
Israelmore Ayivor, The Great Hand Book of Quotes

Maya Angelou
“I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel”
Maya Angelou

“Improvement is achieved by the ripple effect of a few simple changes in approach, attitude, or habit.”
Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger

“He very soon acquired the reputation of being the best public speaker of his time. He had taken pains to master the art, approaching it with scientific precision. On the morning of a day on which he was giving a speech, he once told Wilkie Collins, he would take a long walk during which he would establish the various headings to be dealt with. Then, in his mind’s eye, he would arrange them as on a cart wheel, with himself as the hub and each heading a spoke. As he dealt with a subject, the relevant imaginary spoke would drop out. When there were no more spokes, the speech was at an end. Close observers of Dickens noticed that while he was speaking he would make a quick action of the finger at the end of each topic, as if he were knocking the spoke away.”
Simon Callow, Charles Dickens and the Great Theatre of the World

Aristotle
“The maxim, as has been already said, is a general statement, and people love to hear stated in general terms what they already believe in some particular connexion: e.g. if a man happens to have bad neighbors or bad children, he will agree with any one who tells him 'Nothing is more annoying than having neighbors,' or, 'Nothing is more foolish than to be the parent of children.' The orator has therefore to guess the subjects on which his hearers really hold views already, and what those views are, and then must express, as general truths, these same views on these same subjects. This is one advantage of using maxims.”
Aristotle, The Rhetoric & The Poetics of Aristotle

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