Quotes About Psychiatry

Quotes tagged as "psychiatry" (showing 1-30 of 197)
C.G. Jung
“Show me a sane man and I will cure him for you.”
C.G. Jung

Theodore J. Kaczynski
“Imagine a society that subjects people to conditions that make them terribly unhappy then gives them the drugs to take away their unhappiness. Science fiction It is already happening to some extent in our own society. Instead of removing the conditions that make people depressed modern society gives them antidepressant drugs. In effect antidepressants are a means of modifying an individual's internal state in such a way as to enable him to tolerate social conditions that he would otherwise find intolerable.”
Theodore J. Kaczynski

Rodney Dangerfield
“I told my psychiatrist that everyone hates me. He said I was being ridiculous - everyone hasn't met me yet.”
Rodney Dangerfield

William Shakespeare
“Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor?

Doctor: Not so sick, my lord, as she is troubled with thick-coming fancies that keep her from rest.

Macbeth: Cure her of that! Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, raze out the written troubles of the brain, and with some sweet oblivious antidote cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff which weighs upon her heart.

Doctor: Therein the patient must minister to himself.”
William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Sigmund Freud
“My love is something valuable to me which I ought not to throw away without reflection.”
Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents

Derek Landy
“Talking about one's feelings defeats the purpose of having those feelings. Once you try to put the human experience into words, it becomes little more than a spectator sport. Everything must have a cause, and a name. Every random thought must have a root in something else.”
Derek Landy, Death Bringer

Kay Redfield Jamison
“I decided early in graduate school that I needed to do something about my moods. It quickly came down to a choice between seeing a psychiatrist or buying a horse. Since almost everyone I knew was seeing a psychiatrist, and since I had an absolute belief that I should be able to handle my own problems, I naturally bought a horse.”
Kay Redfield Jamison, An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness

Kevin Alan Lee
“In my opinion, our health care system has failed when a doctor fails to treat an illness that is treatable.”
Kevin Alan Lee, The Split Mind: Schizophrenia from an Insider's Point of View

Sigmund Freud
“When a love-relationship is at its height there is no room left for any interest in the environment; a pair of lovers are sufficient to themselves”
Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents

Samuel R. Delany
“But I realized something. About art. And psychiatry. They're both self-perpetuating systems. Like religion. All three of them promise you a sense of inner worth and meaning, and spend a lot of time telling you about the suffering you have to go through to achieve it. As soon as you get a problem in any one of them, the solution it gives is always to go deeper into the same system. They're all in rather uneasy truce with one another in what's actually a mortal battle. Like all self-reinforcing systems. At best, each is trying to encompass the other two and define them as sub-groups. You know: religion and art are both forms of madness and madness is the realm of psychiatry. Or, art is the study and praise of man and man's ideals, so therefore a religious experience just becomes a brutalized aesthetic response and psychiatry is just another tool for the artist to observe man and render his portraits more accurately. And the religious attitude I guess is that the other two are only useful as long as they promote the good life. At worst, they all try to destroy one another. Which is what my psychiatrist, whether he knew it or not, was trying, quite effectively, to do to my painting. I gave up psychiatry too, pretty soon. I just didn't want to get all wound up in any systems at all.”
Samuel R. Delany, Dhalgren

Megan Chance
“Calling it lunacy makes it easier to explain away the things we don't understand.”
Megan Chance, The Spiritualist

“They called me mad, and I called them mad, and damn them, they outvoted me.”
Nathaniel Lee

S.M. Boyce
“Maybe you’re so good at listening that you have no idea when to speak.” ~Braeden”
S.M. Boyce, Lichgates

Mordecai Richler
“I don't hold with shamans, witch doctors, or psychiatrists. Shakespeare, Tolstoy, or even Dickens, understood more about the human condition than ever occurred to any of you. You overrated bunch of charlatans deal with the grammar of human problems, and the writers I've mentioned with the essence.”
Mordecai Richler, Barney's Version

Neel Burton
“You see, people in the depressive position are often stigmatised as ‘failures' or ‘losers'. Of course, nothing could be further from the truth. If these people are in the depressive position, it is most probably because they have tried too hard or taken on too much, so hard and so much that they have made themselves ‘ill with depression'. In other words, if these people are in the depressive position, it is because their world was simply not good enough for them. They wanted more, they wanted better, and they wanted different, not just for themselves, but for all those around them. So if they are failures or losers, this is only because they set the bar far too high. They could have swept everything under the carpet and pretended, as many people do, that all is for the best in the best of possible worlds. But unlike many people, they had the honesty and the strength to admit that something was amiss, that something was not quite right. So rather than being failures or losers, they are just the opposite: they are ambitious, they are truthful, and they are courageous. And that is precisely why they got ‘ill'. To make them believe that they are suffering from some chemical imbalance in the brain and that their recovery depends solely or even mostly on popping pills is to do them a great disfavour: it is to deny them the precious opportunity not only to identify and address important life problems, but also to develop a deeper and more refined appreciation of themselves and of the world around them—and therefore to deny them the opportunity to fulfil their highest potential as human beings.”
Neel Burton

Thomas Szasz
“Is psychiatry a medical enterprise concerned with treating diseases, or a humanistic enterprise concerned with helping persons with their personal problems? Psychiatry could be one or the other, but it cannot--despite the pretensions and protestations of psichiatrists--be both.”
Thomas Szasz

R.D. Laing
“Perfection is something we should all strive for. It's a duty and a joy to perfect one's nature... The most difficult thing is love. A loveless, driving person that just competes in the rat race is far from perfection in my book.”
R.D. Laing

Carl Elliott
“On Prozac, Sisyphus might well push the boulder back up the mountain with more enthusiasm and creativity. I do not want to deny the benefits of psychoactive medication. I just want to point out that Sisyphus is not a patient with a mental health problem. To see him as a patient with a mental health problem is to ignore certain larger aspects of his predicament connected to boulders, mountains, and eternity.”
Carl Elliott

Tom Upton
“You have to figure that there is something seriously wrong with somebody who wants to enter a profession that deals with whether people are screwing enough. Dealing with spirits, spooks, and demons almost seemed normal.”
Tom Upton, Hellhounds

Jon Ronson
“Shall we go?' he murmured, perhaps regretting his decision to show me his army of plastic cartoon figurines.”
Jon Ronson, The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry

Viktor E. Frankl
“For too long a time--for half a century, in fact--psychiatry tried to interpret the human mind merely as a mechanism, and consequently the therapy of mental disease merely in terms of technique. I believe this dream has been dreamt out. What now begins to loom on the horizon is not psychologized medicine but rather those of human psychiatry.”
Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning

Robert Whitaker
“And what science had revealed was this: Prior to treatment, patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, depression, and other psychiatric disorders do not suffer from any known "chemical imbalance". However, once a person is put on a psychiatric medication, which, in one manner or another, throws a wrench into the usual mechanics of a neuronal pathway, his or her brain begins to function, as Hyman observed, abnormally.”
Robert Whitaker, Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America

Ellen Glasgow
“A little later, when breakfast was over and I had not yet gone up-stairs to my room, I had my first interview with Doctor Brandon, the famous alienist who was in charge of the case. I had never seen him before, but from the first moment that I looked at him I took his measure, almost by intuition. He was, I suppose, honest enough -- I have always granted him that, bitterly as I have felt toward him. It wasn't his fault that he lacked red blood in his brain, or that he had formed the habit, from long association with abnormal phenomena, of regarding all life as a disease. He was the sort of physician -- every nurse will understand what I mean -- who deals instinctively with groups instead of with individuals. He was long and solemn and very round in the face; and I hadn't talked to him ten minutes before I knew he had been educated in Germany, and that he had learned over there to treat every emotion as a pathological manifestation. I used to wonder what he got out of life -- what any one got out of life who had analyzed away everything except the bare structure.”
Ellen Glasgow, The Shadowy Third

“If there is one central intellectual reality at the end of the twentieth century, it is that the biological approach to psychiatry--treating mental illness as a genetically influenced disorder of brain chemistry--has been a smashing success. Freud's ideas, which dominated the history of psychiatry for the past half century, are now vanishing like the last snows of winter.”
Edward Shorter, A History of Psychiatry: From the Era of the Asylum to the Age of Prozac

“ It's a ridiculous profession and it's getting worse. It's becoming almost like palm reading or phrenology. It's been relegated to pop best sellers and talk shows. The only people that take it seriously are upper middle class people who are lonely and can afford to pay someone to listen to them. ”
Ian Shoales

“The complex interplay of the emotions, however, is far beyond the understanding of functional neuroanatomists. Where, for example, are the representations of the id, ego, and and the superego? Through what pathway are ethical and moral judgments shepherded? What processes allow beauty to be in the eye of the beholder? These philosophical questions represent a true frontier of human discovery.”
Benjamin Sadock, Kaplan and Sadock's Synopsis of Psychiatry

“The duality and the freewill don't exist. There's only one choice to be made, the one that bring us upwards. Self-destruction is not a choice. And yet, every duality presents exactly that, and not really a choice.”
Robin Sacredfire

“[A]ll mental disorders are in some sense passionate convictions about the situation of the self in the world.”
Alan A. Stone

“Despite what you might think, NORMAL people do NOT cause problems, misfortunes, conflicts, distress or accidents. And when they do, they CAN apologize and recognize their negative influence. A person that causes these things and can’t assume any responsibility for them is, apart from showing the cognitive and moral level of a child, deserving nothing more than abandonment, because she is dangerous at all levels and can hurt, or even kill, someone BY ACCIDENT, including herself and whoever is with her. A person like this DOES NOT deserve any TRUST for ANYTHING, ABSOLUTELY ANYTHING.”
Robin Sacredfire

“Se não mentir a si próprio, descobrirá que é uma pessoa com limites e deixará de querer ir a todas, como fazem os fóbicos. Também não será dono da verdade nem tão importante como são os paranóicos. Não será o mais perfeito, o que fica para os obsessivos, nem tão brilhante ou poderoso como os histriónicos e psicopatas. Não será uma pessoa muito original, como os esquizofrénicos, nem um génio, como os maníaco-depressivos. Será apenas uma pessoa comum que aceita os desafios e os paradoxos da vida, faz o possível para, em cada momento, dar o que pode e actuar em conjunto com os outros. No entanto, tem de assumir a responsabilidade completa pelas suas acções. Afinal, todos fomos expulsos do Paraíso e condenados à solidariedade. Fizemos das fraquezas forças e, uns com os outros, construímos coisas admiráveis.
Convenhamos, entretanto, que tudo isto é muito complicado, pouco gratificante e difícil de fazer. Fácil, fácil, é mesmo tornar-se doente mental.”
J.L. Pio Abreu, Como Tornar-se Doente Mental

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