Quotes About Pride And Prejudice

Quotes tagged as "pride-and-prejudice" (showing 1-30 of 126)
Jane Austen
“You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding— certainly too little for the convenience of the world. I cannot forget the follies and vices of other so soon as I ought, nor their offenses against myself. My feelings are not puffed about with every attempt to move them. My temper would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“My good opinion once lost is lost forever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Her heart did whisper that he had done it for her.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I might as well enquire,” replied she, “why with so evident a design of offending and insulting me, you chose to tell me that you liked me against your will, against your reason, and even against your character?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I am determined that only the deepest love will induce me into matrimony. So, I shall end an old maid, and teach your ten children to embroider cushions and play their instruments very ill.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“The more I see of the world, the more am i dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistencies of all human.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again.”
Jane Austen

Jane Austen
“Obstinate, headstrong girl!”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Elizabeth had never been more at a loss to make her feelings appear what they were not. It was necessary to laugh, when she would rather have cried.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

“He had even read Pride and Prejudice--although he had thought that many of the heroine's problems would have been solved if someone had simply strangled her mother.”
Lynn Viehl, Private Demon

“I'm fully aware," Firth told a reporter for the English magazine Now, "that if I were to change professions tomorrow, become an astronaut and be the first man to land on Mars, the headlines in the newspapers would read: `Mr. Darcy Lands on Mars.”
Colin Firth

Jane Austen
“I have the highest respect for your nerves, they are my old friends.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I am determined that nothing but the deepest love could ever induce me into matrimony. [Elizabeth]”
Jane Austen

Melissa Nathan
“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a large ego must be in want of a woman to cut him down to size”
Melissa Nathan

Jane Austen
“Do you talk by rule, then, while you are dancing?"

Sometimes. One must speak a little, you know. It would look odd to be entirely silent for half an hour together, and yet for the advantage of some, conversation ought to be so arranged as that they may have the trouble of saying as little as possible.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“If you were to give me forty such men, I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness. No, no, let me shift for myself; and, perhaps, if I have very good luck, I may meet with another Mr. Collins in time.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Charlotte Brontë
“I had not seen "Pride and Prejudice," till I read that sentence of yours, and then I got the book. And what did I find? An accurate daguerreotyped portrait of a common-place face; a carefully fenced, highly cultivated garden, with neat borders and delicate flowers; but no glance of a bright, vivid physiognomy, no open country, no fresh air, no blue hill, no bonny beck. I should hardly like to live with her ladies and gentlemen, in their elegant but confined houses.”
Charlotte Brontë

Steve Hockensmith
“Walking out in the middle of a funeral would be, of course, bad form. So attempting to walk out on one's own was beyond the pale.”
Steve Hockensmith, Dawn of the Dreadfuls

Jane Austen
“An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“And so ended his affection," said Elizabeth impatiently. "There has
been many a one, I fancy, overcome in the same way. I wonder who first
discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!"

"I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love," said Darcy.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Lauren Willig
“Quite definitely a Bingley”
Lauren Willig, The Mischief of the Mistletoe

Jane Austen
“What praise is more valuable than the praise of an intelligent servant?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

“I have come to realise that your are the most important person in the world to me, and I wanted to know if you would consider... if you would do me the honour of becoming my wife”
C. Allyn Pierson, Mr. Darcy's Little Sister

Jane Austen
“We neither of us perform to strangers.”
Jane Austen

Jane Austen
“But if I were you, I would stand by the nephew. He has more to give.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Dodie Smith
“Did you think of anything when Miss Marcy said Scoatney Hall was being re-opened? I thought of the beginning of Pride and Prejudice – where Mrs. Bennet says 'Netherfield Park is let a last.' And then Mr. Bennet goes over to call on the rich new owner.”
Dodie Smith, I Capture the Castle

Jane Austen
“If you will thank me," he replied, "let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you might add force to the other inducements which led me on, I shall not attempt to deny. But your family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought only of you."

Elizabeth was too much embarrassed to say a word. After a short pause, her companion added, "You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever."

Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances.The happiness which this reply produced was such as he had probably never felt before, and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

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