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Quotes About Positivism

Quotes tagged as "positivism" (showing 1-16 of 16)
Lisa Schroeder
“Joy, not sorrow.
Laughter, not tears.
Life, not death.
Love, not blame.”
Lisa Schroeder, I Heart You, You Haunt Me

Joris-Karl Huysmans
“Worshiping the Devil is no more insane than worshiping God...It is precisely at the moment when positivism is at its high-water mark that mysticism stirs into life and the follies of occultism begin.”
Joris-Karl Huysmans

Ann Druyan
“If you are searching for sacred knowledge and not just a palliative for your fears, then you will train yourself to be a good skeptic.”
Ann Druyan

Auguste Comte
“The sacred formula of positivism: love as a principle, the order as a foundation, and progress as a goal.”
Auguste Comte

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“It is man's unique privilege, among all other organisms. By pursuing falsehood you will arrive at the truth!”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Auguste Comte
“From the study of the development of human intelligence, in all directions, and through all times, the discovery arises of a great fundamental law, to which it is necessarily subject, and which has a solid foundation of proof, both in the facts of our organization and in our historical experience. The law is this: that each of our leading conceptions -- each branch of our knowledge -- passes successively through three different theoretical conditions: the theological, or fictitious; the metaphysical, or abstract; and the scientific, or positive. In other words, the human mind, by its nature, employs in its progress three methods of philosophizing, the character of which is essentially different, and even radically opposed: namely, the theological method, the metaphysical, and the positive. Hence arise three philosophies, or general systems of conceptions on the aggregate of phenomena, each of which excludes the others. The first is the necessary point of departure of the human understanding, and the third is its fixed and definitive state. The second is merely a state of transition.”
Auguste Comte, Cours de philosophie positive. (1/6)

Carl Schmitt
“The crisis of European jurisprudence began a century ago with the victory of legal positivism.”
Carl Schmitt, The Plight of European Jurisprudence

Auguste Comte
All good intellects have repeated, since Bacon’s time, that there can be no real knowledge but that which is based on observed facts. This is incontestable, in our present advanced stage; but, if we look back to the primitive stage of human knowledge, we shall see that it must have been otherwise then. If it is true that every theory must be based upon observed facts, it is equally true that facts cannot be observed without the guidance of some theory. Without such guidance, our facts would be desultory and fruitless; we could not retain them: for the most part we could not even perceive them.”
Auguste Comte, The Positive Philosophy

Ian Hacking
“Both [Quine and Feyerabend] want to revise a version of positivism. Quine started with the Vienna Circle, and Feyerabend with the Copenhagen school of quantum mechanics. Both the Circle and the school have been called children of Ernst Mach; if so, the philosophies of Feyerabend and Quine must be his grandchildren.”
Ian Hacking, Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy?

John Stuart Mill
Auguste Comte, in particular, whose social system, as unfolded in his Systeme de Politique Positive, aims at establishing (though by moral more than by legal appliances) a despotism of society over the individual, surpassing anything contemplated in the political ideal of the most rigid disciplinarian among the ancient philosophers.”
John Stuart Mill

Carl Schmitt
“Hauriou, became a crown witness for us when he confirmed this connection in 1916, in the midst of WWI: “The revolution of 1789 had no other goal than absolute access to the writing of legal statutes and the systematic destruction of customary institutions. It resulted in a state of permanent revolution because the mobility of the writing of laws did not provide for the stability of certain customary institutions, because the forces of change were stronger than the forces of stability. Social and political life in France was completely emptied of institutions and was only able to provisionally maintain itself by sudden jolts spurred by the heightened morality.”
Carl Schmitt, The Plight of European Jurisprudence

Carl Schmitt
“The motorization of law into mere decree was not yet the culmination of simplifications and accelerations. New accelerations were produced by market regulations and state control of the economy —with their numerous and transferable authorizations and subauthorizations to various offices, associations and commissions concerned with economic decisions. Thus in Germany, the concept of “directive” appeared next to the concept of “decree.” This was “the elastic form of legislation,” surpassing the decree in terms of speed and simplicity. Whereas the decree was called a “motorized law,” the directive became a “motorized decree.” Here independent, purely positivist jurisprudence lost its freedom of maneuver. Law became a means of planning, an administrative act, a directive.”
Carl Schmitt, The Plight of European Jurisprudence

Carl Schmitt
“The essence and value of the law lies in its stability and durability (...), in its “relative eternity.” Only then does the legislator’s self-limitation and the independence of the law-bound judge find an anchor. The experiences of the French Revolution showed how an unleashed pouvoir législatif could generate a legislative orgy.”
Carl Schmitt, The Plight of European Jurisprudence

Carl Schmitt
“Legality has become a poisonous dagger, with which one party stabs the other in the back.”
Carl Schmitt, The Plight of European Jurisprudence

Carl Schmitt
“True law is not imposed; it arises from unintentional developments. (...)Law emerges (...) as something not merely legislated but given. The later positivism knows no origin and has no home. It recognizes only causes or basic norms. It seeks to be the opposite of “unintended” law. Its ultimate goal is control and calculability.”
Carl Schmitt, The Plight of European Jurisprudence

William Barrett
“Positivist man is a curious creature who dwells in the tiny island of light composed of what he finds scientifically "meaningful," while the whole surrounding area in which ordinary men live from day to day and have their dealings with other men is consigned to the outer darkness of the "meaningless." Positivism has simply accepted the fractured being of modern man and erected a philosophy to intensify it.

Existentialism, whether successfully or not, has attempted instead to gather all the elements of human reality into a total picture of man. Positivist man and Existentialist man are no doubt offspring of the same parent epoch, but, somewhat as Cain and Abel were, the brothers are divided unalterably by temperament and the initial choice they make of their own being.”
William Barrett, Irrational Man: A Study in Existential Philosophy

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