quote

Quotes About Politeness

Quotes tagged as "politeness" (showing 1-30 of 80)
Lemony Snicket
“As I am sure you know, when people say 'It's my pleasure,' they usually mean something along the lines of, 'There's nothing on Earth I would rather do less.' [...]”
Lemony Snicket, The Penultimate Peril

Dumas Malone
“The boldness of his mind was sheathed in a scabbard of politeness.”
Dumas Malone, Jefferson the Virginian

Arthur Schopenhauer
“It is a wise thing to be polite; consequently, it is a stupid thing to be rude. To make enemies by unnecessary and willful incivility, is just as insane a proceeding as to set your house on fire. For politeness is like a counter--an avowedly false coin, with which it is foolish to be stingy.”
Arthur Schopenhauer, The Wisdom of Life and Counsels and Maxims

Emma Thompson
“Can he love her? Can the soul really be satisfied with such polite affections? To love is to burn - to be on fire, like Juliet or Guinevere or Eloise...”
Emma Thompson, The Sense and Sensibility Screenplay and Diaries: Bringing Jane Austen's Novel to Film

C. JoyBell C.
“Politeness is okay, but it gets old and boring. You want to attack life with a passion, not a politeness, you want people to think about you and remember you and say "she is so passionate" you don't want people to think about you and remember you and say "she is so polite," because, who cares about polite?”
C. JoyBell C.

Jim Butcher
“Nay, but prithee, with sprinkles 'pon it instead," I said solemnly, "and frosting of white.”
Jim Butcher, Small Favor

Diane Setterfield
“Politeness. Now there's a poor man's virtue if ever there was one. What's so admirable about inoffensiveness, I should like to know. After all, it's easily achieved. One needs no particular talent to be polite. On the contrary, being nice is what's left when you've failed at everything else. People with ambition don't give a damn what other people think about them.”
Diane Setterfield, The Thirteenth Tale

Paul Valéry
“Politeness is organized indifference.”
Paul Valéry

Louisa May Alcott
“A real gentleman is as polite to a little girl as to a woman.”
Louisa May Alcott, An Old-Fashioned Girl

Stephen King
“Reading at meals is considered rude in polite society, but if you expect to succeed as a writer, rudeness should be the second-to-least of your concerns. The least of all should be polite society and what it expects.”
Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Diane Setterfield
“One needs no particular talent to be polite. On the contrary, being nice is what's left when you've failed at everything else.”
Diane Setterfield, The Thirteenth Tale

Theodore Roosevelt
“Politeness [is] a sign of dignity, not subservience.”
Theodore Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt
“Be sincere, Be brief, Be seated.”
Franklin D. Roosevelt

Tiffany Madison
“As a Texan, I say ma'm and sir to my age contemporaries and open doors for anyone that I can. This goes for men, too, though it is appreciated when they beat me to it and disappointing when they don't.”
Tiffany Madison

Adam Rex
“Woah,' I said, blocking the doorway. 'You can't come in here. This is the girls' room.'
Even as it came out of my mouth, I knew it sounded dumb. Dumb, I thought and maybe even wrong.
You...are a boy, aren't you?' I asked. 'I mean, don't take that the wrong way or anything -'
J.Lo is a boy, yes.' I let that go.
So...you Boov have boys and girls...just like us?'
Of course,' said J.Lo. 'Do not be ridicumlous.'
I smiled a wan little smile. 'Sorry.'
The Boov have seven magnificent genders. There is boy, girl, girlboy, boygirl, boyboy, boyboygirl, and boyboyboyboy.'
I had absolutely no response to this.”
Adam Rex, The True Meaning of Smekday

Otto von Bismarck
“Be polite; write diplomatically; even in a declaration of war one observes the rules of politeness.”
Otto von Bismarck

Jeff Bezos
“E-mail has some magical ability to turn off the politeness gene in a human being.”
Jeff Bezos

Anne Brontë
“Preserve me from such cordiality! It is like handling briar-roses and may-blossoms - bright enough to the eye, and outwardly soft to the touch, but you know there are thorns beneath, and every now and then you feel them too; and perhaps resent the injury by crushing them in till you have destroyed their power, though somewhat to the detriment of your own fingers.”
Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

Franny Billingsley
“I still can't understand how Cecil and my old tutor, Fitz, got along so well, when we often called Fitz 'the Genius' and avoided calling Cecil anything at all, so as not to be rude.”
Franny Billingsley, Chime

Clare B. Dunkle
“Lively, intelligent, and quite immature, [Emily] usually burst out with exactly the comment that summed up the situation beautifully and therefore could never in politeness be said.”
Clare B. Dunkle, The Hollow Kingdom

Lynne Truss
“There is an old German fable about porcupines who need to huddle together for warmth, but are in danger of hurting each other with their spines. When they find the optimum distance to share each other's warmth without putting each other's eyes out, their state of contrived cooperation is called good manners. Well, those old German fabulists certainly knew a thing or two. When you acknowledge other people politely, the signal goes out, "I'm here. You're there. I'm staying here. You're staying there. Aren't we both glad we sorted that out?" When people don't acknowledge each other politely, the lesson from the porcupine fable is unmistakeable. "Freeze or get stabbed, mate. It's your choice.”
Lynne Truss, Talk to the Hand: The Utter Bloody Rudeness of the World Today, or Six Good Reasons to Stay Home and Bolt the Door

Henning Mankell
“He was so excessively polite that Wallendar suspected he had endured many humiliations in his life.”
Henning Mankell, The Dogs of Riga

Sophie Jordan
“Ironic. I'm here because of my inherent dangerousness, but it's my inherent politeness that makes me put up with this. With him.”
Sophie Jordan, Uninvited

Mary Stanton
“This was our last night. We only had one curtain call, Bree. And I thought they were going to give us a standing ovation, but no-o-o-. Do you know why half the audience stood up?"
"To get a head start on the traffic," Bree said.
"To get a head start on the traffic," Antonia agreed in indignation. "I mean, here we are, dancing and singing our little guts out, and all those folks want to do is get to bed early. I ask you, whatever happened to common courtesy? Whatever happened to decent manners? Doesn't anyone care about craft anymore? And on top of that, it's not even nice.”
Mary Stanton, Defending Angels

“She already told me that she doesn't have to be nice, so why do I? Because my mother raised me right? That's why wolves always win. Because the rest of us mind our manners and get devoured for our efforts.”
Sheryl J. Anderson, Killer Cocktail

“But Johannes had said, "Politeness is something you owe other people, because when you show a little courtesy, everything becomes easier and better. But first and foremost, it's something you owe yourself. You are David.”
Anne Holm, I Am David

Andrew Ashling
“Oh, hon, it's the little courtesies that make life bearable, I find, wouldn't you agree?”
Andrew Ashling, The Invisible Chains - Part 1: Bonds of Hate

Tahir Shah
“As the head of an expedition, you can't pussyfoot around being polite to everyone. You have to show your teeth once in a while; a little growling goes a long way.”
Tahir Shah, House of the Tiger King: The Quest for a Lost City

Tony Hawks
“One of the more tiring aspects of hitchhiking is a need to be sociable and make conversation with whoever is driving you. It would be considered poor form to accept a ride, hop into the passenger seat and then simply to crash out until you reached your destination. How I longed to do just that, but instead I chatted merrily away, energy ebbing from me with each sentence, until Chris dropped me at the address of the lady who had offered me free B&B.
One of the more tiring aspect of accepting an offer of free accommodation is a need to be sociable and make conversation with whoever had offered it to you. It would be considered poor form to turn up, dumb your bags, crawl into your bedroom and order an early morning alarm call. How I longed to do just that, but instead I chatted merrily away to Marjorie, energy ebbing from me with each sentence, until the tea was drunk, the cake was eaten and I finally plucked up the courage to mention just how exhausted I was. I apologised and said that I simply had to grab a couple of hours sleep, and Marjorie understandingly showed me to my room.”
Tony Hawks, Round Ireland with a Fridge

« previous 1 3
All Quotes | My Quotes | Add A Quote


Browse By Tag

More...