Quotes About Poets

Quotes tagged as "poets" (showing 91-120 of 506)
“I bargained with Life for a penny,
And Life would pay no more,
However I begged at evening
When I counted my scanty store;

For Life is just an employer,
He gives you what you ask,
But once you have set the wages,
Why, you must bear the task.

I worked for a menial's hire,
Only to learn, dismayed,
That any wage I had asked of Life,
Life would have paid.”
Jessie B. Rittenhouse

Rainer Maria Rilke
“All things want to float.”
Rainer Maria Rilke

A.E. Housman
“Therefore, since the world has still
Much good, but much less good than ill,
And while the sun and moon endure
Luck's a chance, but trouble's sure,
I'd face it as a wise man would,
And train for ill and not for good.”
A.E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad

Robert Graves
“There’s no money in poetry, but there’s no poetry in money, either”
Robert Graves

Carolyn Kizer
“Poets are interested primarily in death and commas. ”
Carolyn Kizer

William Stafford
“Keep a journal, and don't assume that your work has to accomplish anything worthy: artists and peace-workers are in it for the long haul, and not to be judged by immediate results.”
William Stafford, Every War Has Two Losers: William Stafford on Peace and War
tags: poets

Sanober  Khan
“your smile.
is the ultimate
golden dream.
all the poems
in the world
are waking up from.”
Sanober Khan

فروغ فرخزاد
“I believe in being a poet in all moments of life. Being a poet means being human. I know some poets whose daily behavior has nothing to do with their poetry. In other words, they are only poets when they write poetry. Then it is finished and they turn into greedy, indulgent, oppressive, shortsighted, miserable, and envious people. Well, I cannot believe their poems”
فروغ فرخزاد

Søren Kierkegaard
“A poet is an unhappy being whose heart is torn by secret suffrings, but whose lips are so strangely formed that when the sighs and the cries escape them, they sound like beautiful music. People corwd around the poet and say to him: "Sing for us soon again;" that is as much to say, "May new sufferings torment your soul.”
Søren Kierkegaard

Seamus Heaney
“I suppose I'm saying that defiance is actually part of the lyric job”
Seamus Heaney

Robert Hass
“August is dust here. Drought
stuns the road,
but juice gathers in the berries.”
Robert Hass, Praise

W.H. Auden
“no poet can know what his poem is going to be like until he has written it.”
W.H. Auden, The Dyer's Hand

H.L. Mencken
“A poet more than thirty years old is simply an overgrown child.”
H.L. Mencken
tags: poets

John Berryman
“Them lady poets must not marry, pal . . . It is a true error to marry with poets / or to be by them.”
John Berryman, The Dream Songs

Stephen Dunn
“All good poems are victories over something.”
Stephen Dunn

William Stafford
“This dream the world is having about itself
includes a trace on the plains of the Oregon trail,
a groove in the grass my father showed us all
one day while meadowlarks were trying to tell
something better about to happen.”
William Stafford, The Way It Is: New and Selected Poems

William Stafford
“Between roars the lion purrs.”
William Stafford, Every War Has Two Losers: William Stafford on Peace and War
tags: poets

Wallace Stevens
“A poem is a meteor.”
Wallace Stevens

Mark Strand
“I is for immortality, which for some poets is a necessary compensation. Presumably miserable in this life, they will be remembered when the rest of us are long forgotten. None of them asks about the quality of that remembrance--what it will be like to crouch in the dim hallways of somebody's mind until the moment of recollection occurs, or to be lifted off suddenly and forever into the pastures of obscurity. Most poets know better than to concern themselves with such things. They know the chances are better than good that their poems will die when they do and never be heard of again, that they'll be replaced by poems sporting a new look in a language more current. They also know that even if individual poems die, though in some cases slowly, poetry will continue: that its subjects, it constant themes, are less liable to change than fashions in language, and that this is where an alternate, less lustrous immortality might be. We all know that a poem can influence other poems, remain alive in them, just as previous poems are alive in it. Could we not say, therefore, that individual poems succeed most by encouraging revisions of themselves and inducing their own erasure? Yes, but is this immortality, or simply a purposeful way of being dead?”
Mark Strand, The Weather of Words: Poetic Inventions

Robert Creeley
“Still, no one finally knows what a poet is supposed either to be or to do. Especially in this country, one takes on the job—because all that one does in America is considered a "job"—with no clear sense as to what is required or where one will ultimately be led. In that respect, it is as particular an instance of a "calling" as one might point to. For years I've kept in mind, "Many are called but few are chosen." Even so "called," there were no assurances that one would be answered.”
Robert Creeley
tags: poets

Yiannis Ritsos
“… the fisherman’s daughter grinding serenity in her coffee grinder.”
Yiannis Ritsos, The Fourth Dimension

“One could say that artists are people who think naturally in highly patterned ways.”
Helen Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology

Annie Finch
“Criticism is like politics: if you don't make your own you are by default accepting the status quo and are finally yourself responsible for whatever the status quo does to you.”
Annie Finch, The Body of Poetry: Essays on Women, Form, and the Poetic Self

Julio Cortázar
“Thirsty for being, the poet ceaselessly reaches out to reality, seeking with the indefatigable harpoon of the poem a reality that is always better hidden, more re(g)al. The poem’s power is as an instrument of possession but at the same time, ineffably, it expresses the desire for possession, like a net that fishes by itself, a hook that is also the desire of the fish. To be a poet is to desire and, at the same time, to obtain, in the exact shape of the desire.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds

Julio Cortázar
“I am talking about the responsibility of the poet, who is irresponsible by definition, an anarchist enamored of a solar order and never of the new order or whatever slogan makes five or six hundred million men march in step in a parody of order.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds

Sanober  Khan
“poets. have
the toughest job
in the universe-

of turning silence
into eloquence.”
Sanober Khan

Ernest Hemingway
“I had never known any man to die while speaking in terza-rima”
Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Wallace Stevens
“From oriole to crow, note the decline
In music. Crow is realist. But, then,
Oriole, also, may be realist.”
Wallace Stevens, The Palm at the End of the Mind: Selected Poems and a Play
tags: poets

Lucia Perillo
“It is ferocious, life, but it must eat . . .”
Lucia Perillo, Luck Is Luck: Poems

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