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Quotes About Pleasure

Quotes tagged as "pleasure" (showing 1-30 of 499)
John Green
“I'm in love with you," he said quietly.

"Augustus," I said.

"I am," he said. He was staring at me, and I could see the corners of his eyes crinkling. "I'm in love with you, and I'm not in the business of denying myself the simple pleasure of saying true things. I'm in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we're all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth we'll ever have, and I am in love with you.”
John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

The Seven Social Sins are: Wealth without work. Pleasure without conscience. Knowledge without character. Commerce
“The Seven Social Sins are:

Wealth without work.
Pleasure without conscience.
Knowledge without character.
Commerce without morality.
Science without humanity.
Worship without sacrifice.
Politics without principle.


From a sermon given by Frederick Lewis Donaldson in Westminster Abbey, London, on March 20, 1925.”
Frederick Lewis Donaldson

E.B. White
“If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy. If it were merely challenging, that would be no problem. But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.”
E.B. White

Neil Gaiman
“Face your life, its pain, its pleasure, leave no path untaken.”
Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book

Jane Austen
“You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Neil Gaiman
“Sleep my little baby-oh
Sleep until you waken
When you wake you'll see the world
If I'm not mistaken...

Kiss a lover
Dance a measure,
Find your name
And buried treasure...

Face your life
Its pain,
Its pleasure,
Leave no path untaken.”
Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book

Dorothy Parker
“If I didn't care for fun and such,
I'd probably amount to much.
But I shall stay the way I am,
Because I do not give a damn.”
Dorothy Parker, Enough Rope

John Lubbock
“Art is unquestionably one of the purest and highest elements in human happiness. It trains the mind through the eye, and the eye through the mind. As the sun colors flowers, so does art color life.”
John Lubbock, The Pleasures of Life

Oscar Wilde
“I adore simple pleasures. They are the last refuge of the complex.”
Oscar Wilde

Neil Gaiman
“Kiss a lover,
Dance a measure,
Find your name
And buried treasure.

Face your life,
It's pain,
It's pleasure,
Leave no path untaken.”
Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“My God, a moment of bliss. Why, isn't that enough for a whole lifetime?”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, White Nights

Victor Hugo
“Melancholy is the happiness of being sad.”
Victor Hugo

Hermann Hesse
“So she thoroughly taught him that one cannot take pleasure without giving pleasure, and that every gesture, every caress, every touch, every glance, every last bit of the body has its secret, which brings happiness to the person who knows how to wake it. She taught him that after a celebration of love the lovers should not part without admiring each other, without being conquered or having conquered, so that neither is bleak or glutted or has the bad feeling of being used or misused.”
Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha

Thomas Hardy
“People go on marrying because they can't resist natural forces, although many of them may know perfectly well that they are possibly buying a month's pleasure with a life's discomfort.”
Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure

Jane Austen
“...when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion

Alfred Hitchcock
“Give them pleasure. The same pleasure they have when they wake up from a nightmare.”
Alfred Hitchcock

Veronica Franco
“So sweet and delicious do I become,
when I am in bed with a man
who, I sense, loves and enjoys me,
that the pleasure I bring excels all delight,
so the knot of love, however tight
it seemed before, is tied tighter still.”
Veronica Franco, Poems and Selected Letters

Søren Kierkegaard
“Many of us pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that we hurry past it.”
Søren Kierkegaard

Gretchen Rubin
“Laughter is more than just a pleasurable activity...When people laugh together, they tend to talk and touch more and to make eye contact more frequently.”
Gretchen Rubin, The Happiness Project: Or Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun

Rita Mae Brown
“I finally figured out the only reason to be alive is to enjoy it.”
Rita Mae Brown

Jane Austen
“Her pleasure in the walk must arise from the exercise and the day, from the view of the last smiles of the year upon the tawny leaves and withered hedges, and from repeating to herself some few of the thousand poetical descriptions extant of autumn--that season of peculiar and inexhaustible influence on the mind of taste and tenderness--that season which has drawn from every poet worthy of being read some attempt at description, or some lines of feeling.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion

Elizabeth Gilbert
“Americans have an inability to relax into sheer pleasure.Ours is an entertainment seeking-nation, but not necessarily a pleasure-seeking one....This is the cause of that great sad American stereotype- the overstressed executive who goes on vacation, but who cannot relax.”
Elizabeth Gilbert, Eat, Pray, Love

Christopher Marlowe
“He that loves pleasure must for pleasure fall.”
Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus

Michel de Montaigne
“I find I am much prouder of the victory I obtain over myself, when, in the very ardor of dispute, I make myself submit to my adversary’s force of reason, than I am pleased with the victory I obtain over him through his weakness.”
Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays

Walter Savage Landor
“Nothing is pleasanter to me than exploring in a library.”
Walter Savage Landor, Pericles and Aspasia

Anthony Kiedis
“I've wanted to feel pleasure to the point of insanity. They call it getting high, because it's wanting to know that higher level, that godlike level. You want to touch the heavens, you want to feel glory and euphoria, but the trick is it takes work. You can't buy it, you can't get it on a street corner, you can't steal it or inject it or shove it up your ass, you have to earn it.”
Anthony Kiedis, Scar Tissue

Julian Barnes
“And yet it takes only the smallest pleasure or pain to teach us time’s malleability.”
Julian Barnes, The Sense of an Ending

Héloïse d'Argenteuil
“If the portraits of our absent friends are pleasant to us, which renew our memory of them and relieve our regret for their absence by a false and empty consolation, how much more pleasant are letters which bring us the written characters of the absent friend.”
Héloïse d'Argenteuil, The Letters of Abélard and Héloïse

Stephen Dunn
“Altruism is for those
who can't endure their desires.
There's a world

as ambiguous as a moan,
a pleasure moan
our earnest neighbors

might think a crime.
It's where we could live.
I'll say I love you,

Which will lead, of course,
to disappointment,
but those words unsaid

poison every next moment.
I will try to disappoint you
better than anyone else has.

--Mon Semblable”
Stephen Dunn, Different Hours

W.H. Auden
“A child's reading is guided by pleasure, but his pleasure is undifferentiated; he cannot distinguish, for example, between aesthetic pleasure and the pleasures of learning or daydreaming. In adolescence we realize that there are different kinds of pleasure, some of which cannot be enjoyed simultaneously, but we need help from others in defining them. Whether it be a matter of taste in food or taste in literature, the adolescent looks for a mentor in whose authority he can believe. He eats or reads what his mentor recommends and, inevitably, there are occasions when he has to deceive himself a little; he has to pretend that he enjoys olives or War and Peace a little more than he actually does. Between the ages of twenty and forty we are engaged in the process of discovering who we are, which involves learning the difference between accidental limitations which it is our duty to outgrow and the necessary limitations of our nature beyond which we cannot trespass with impunity. Few of us can learn this without making mistakes, without trying to become a little more of a universal man than we are permitted to be. It is during this period that a writer can most easily be led astray by another writer or by some ideology. When someone between twenty and forty says, apropos of a work of art, 'I know what I like,'he is really saying 'I have no taste of my own but accept the taste of my cultural milieu', because, between twenty and forty, the surest sign that a man has a genuine taste of his own is that he is uncertain of it. After forty, if we have not lost our authentic selves altogether, pleasure can again become what it was when we were children, the proper guide to what we should read.”
W.H. Auden, The Dyer's Hand

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