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Quotes About Outlander

Quotes tagged as "outlander" (showing 1-25 of 25)
Diana Gabaldon
“When the day shall come that we do part," he said softly, and turned to look at me, "if my last words are not 'I love you'-ye'll ken it was because I didna have time.”
Diana Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon
“I will find you," he whispered in my ear. "I promise. If I must endure two hundred years of purgatory, two hundred years without you - then that is my punishment, which I have earned for my crimes. For I have lied, and killed, and stolen; betrayed and broken trust. But there is the one thing that shall lie in the balance. When I shall stand before God, I shall have one thing to say, to weigh against the rest."

His voice dropped, nearly to a whisper, and his arms tightened around me.

Lord, ye gave me a rare woman, and God! I loved her well.”
Diana Gabaldon, Dragonfly in Amber

Diana Gabaldon
“Murtagh was right about women. Sassenach, I risked my life for ye, committing theft, arson, assault, and murder into the bargain. In return for which ye call me names, insult my manhood, kick me in the ballocks and claw my face. Then I beat you half to death and tell ye all the most humiliating things have ever happened to me, and ye say ye love me." He laid his head on his knees and laughed some more. Finally he rose and held out a hand to me, wiping his eyes with the other.
"You're no verra sensible, Sassenach, but I like ye fine. Let's go.”
Diana Gabaldon, Outlander

Diana Gabaldon
“If I die," he whispered in the dark, "dinna follow me. The bairns will need ye. Stay for them. I can wait.”
Diana Gabaldon, A Breath of Snow and Ashes

Diana Gabaldon
“No wonder he was so good with horses, I thought blearily, feeling his fingers rubbing gently behind my ears, listening to the soothing, incomprehensible speech. If I were a horse, I’d let him ride me anywhere.”
Diana Gabaldon, Outlander

Diana Gabaldon
“Harmless as a setting dove," he agreed. "I'm too hungry to be a threat to anything but breakfast. Let a stray bannock come within reach, though, and I'll no answer for the consequences.”
Diana Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon
“All right you bloody Scottish bastard, lets see how stubborn you really are.”
Diana Gabaldon, Outlander

Diana Gabaldon
“Look back, hold a torch to light the recesses of the dark. Listen to the footsteps that echo behind, when you walk alone.
All the time the ghosts flit past and through us, hiding in the future. We look in the mirror and see the shades of other faces looking back through the years; we see the shape of memory, standing solid in an empty doorway. By blood and by choice, we make our ghosts; we haunt ourselves.
Each ghost comes unbidden from the misty grounds of dream and silence.
Our rational minds say, "No, it isn't."
But another part, an older part, echoes always softly in the dark, "Yes, but it could be.”
Diana Gabaldon, Drums of Autumn

Diana Gabaldon
“I have lived through war, and lost much. I know what's worth the fight, and what is not. Honor and courage are matters of the bone, and what a man will kill for, he will sometimes die for, too. And that, O kinsman, is why a woman has broad hips; that bony basin will harbor a man and his child alike. A man's life springs from his woman's bones, and in her blood is his honor christened. For the sake of love alone, I would walk through fire again.”
Diana Gabaldon, The Fiery Cross

Diana Gabaldon
“What's that you're doing, Sassenach?"

"Making out little Gizmo's birth certificate--so far as I can," I added.

"Gizmo?" he said doubtfully. "That will be a saint's name?"

"I shouldn't think so, though you never know, what with people named Pantaleon and Onuphrius. Or Ferreolus."

"Ferreolus? I dinna think I ken that one." He leaned back, hands linked over his knee.

"One of my favorites," I told him, carefully filling in the birthdate and time of birth--even that was an estimate, poor thing. There were precisely two bits of unequivocal information on this birth certificate--the date and the name of the doctor who's delivered him.

"Ferreolus," I went on with some new enjoyment, "is the patron saint of sick poultry. Christian martyr. He was a Roman tribune and a secret Christian. Having been found out, he was chained up in the prison cesspool to await trial--I suppose the cells must have been full. Sounds rather daredevil; he slipped his chains and escaped through the sewer. They caught up with him, though, dragged him back and beheaded him."

Jamie looked blank.

"What has that got to do wi' chickens?"

"I haven't the faintest idea. Take it up with the Vatican," I advised him.

"Mmphm. Aye, well, I've always been fond of Saint Guignole, myself." I could see the glint in his eye, but couldn't resist.

"And what's he the patron of?"

"He's involved against impotence." The glint got stronger. "I saw a statue of him in Brest once; they did say it had been there for a thousand years. 'Twas a miraculous statue--it had a cock like a gun muzzle, and--"

"A what?"

"Well, the size wasna the miraculous bit," he said, waving me to silence. "Or not quite. The townsfolk say that for a thousand years, folk have whittled away bits of it as holy relics, and yet the cock is still as big as ever." He grinned at me. "They do say that a man w' a bit of St. Guignole in his pocket can last a night and a day without tiring."

"Not with the same woman, I don't imagine," I said dryly. "It does rather make you wonder what he did to merit sainthood, though, doesn't it?"

He laughed.

"Any man who's had his prayer answered could tell yet that, Sassenach."
(PP. 841-842)”
Diana Gabaldon, Drums of Autumn

Diana Gabaldon
“Some enterprising rabbit had dug its way under the stakes of my garden again. One voracious rabbit could eat a cabbage down to the roots, and from the looks of things, he'd brought friends. I sighed and squatted to repair the damage, packing rocks and earth back into the hole. The loss of Ian was a constant ache; at such moments as this, I missed his horrible dog as well.

I had brought a large collection of cuttings and seeds from River Run, most of which had survived the journey. It was mid-June, still time--barely--to put in a fresh crop of carrots. The small patch of potato vines was all right, so were the peanut bushes; rabbits wouldn't touch those, and didn't care for the aromatic herbs either, except the fennel, which they gobbled like licorice.

I wanted cabbages, though, to preserve a sauerkraut; come winter, we would want food with some taste to it, as well as some vitamin C. I had enough seed left, and could raise a couple of decent crops before the weather turned cold, if I could keep the bloody rabbits off. I drummed my fingers on the handle of my basket, thinking. The Indians scattered clippings of their hair around the edges of the fields, but that was more protection against deer than rabbits.

Jamie was the best repellent, I decided. Nayawenne had told me that the scent of carnivore urine would keep rabbits away--and a man who ate meat was nearly as good as a mountain lion, to say nothing of being more biddable. Yes, that would do; he'd shot a deer only two days ago; it was still hanging. I should brew a fresh bucket of spruce beer to go with the roast venison, though . . . (Page 844)”
Diana Gabaldon, Drums of Autumn

Diana Gabaldon
“I wouldna cross the road to see a scrawny woman if she was stark naked and dripping wet. ~Jamie Fraser”
Diana Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon
“Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ!" -Claire”
Diana Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon
“He leaned close, rubbing his bearded cheek against my ear. 'And how about a sweet kiss, now, for the brave lads of the clan MacKenzie? Tulach Ard!'
Erin go bragh,' I said rudely, and pushed with all my strength.”
Diana Gabaldon, Outlander

Diana Gabaldon
“It would ha' been a good deal easier, if ye'd only been a witch.”
Diana Gabaldon, The Exile: An Outlander Graphic Novel

Diana Gabaldon
“One dictum I had learned on the battlefields of France in a far distant war: You cannot save the world, but you might save the man in front of you, if you work fast enough.”
Diana Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon
“(...) When I asked my Da how ye knew which was the right woman, he told me when the time came, I'd have no doubt. And I didn't. When I woke in the dark under that tree on the road to Leoch, with you sitting on my chest, cursing me for bleeding to death, I said to myself, 'Jamie Fraser, for all ye canna see what she looks like, and for all she weighs as much as a good draft horse, this is the woman”
Diana Gabaldon, Outlander

Diana Gabaldon
“But Mama--at first I tried to pretend she was only gone, like on a trip. And then when I couldn't do that anymore, I tried to believe she was dead.' Her nose was running, from emotion, whisky, or the heat of the tea. Roger reached for the tea towel hanging by the stove and shoved it across the tabe to her. 'She isn't, though.' She picked up the towel and wiped angrily at her nose. 'That's the trouble! I have to miss her all the time, and know that I'll never see her again, but she isn't even dead! How can I mourn for her, when I think-when I hope-she's happy where she is, when I made her go?”
Diana Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon
“The bravest are surely those who have the clearest mind of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet not with standing go out to meet it”
Diana Gabaldon, The Fiery Cross

Diana Gabaldon
“- Toi d'abord.
- Non, toi.
- Pourquoi ?
- J'ai peur.
- Peur de quoi Sassenach ?
- De ne plus pouvoir m'arrêter de le dire.
Il lança un regard vers la ligne d'horizon où se levait la faucille de la lune.
- C'est bientôt l'hiver et les nuits rallongent, mo duinne.
Serrée contre lui, je sentais son cœur battre.
- Je t'aime.”
Diana Gabaldon, Outlander

Diana Gabaldon
“Is thee afraid of me, Rachel?" he whispered.
"I am," she whispered back, and closed her hand on his wounded shoulder, lightly but not enough for him to feel the hurt of it. "And I am afraid for thee, as well. But there are things I fear much more than death--and to be without thee is what I fear most.”
Diana Gabaldon

Diana Gabaldon
“The Continental army got more generals than they got private soldiers, these days. An officer lives through more 'n two battles, they make him some kind of general on the spot. Now, gettin' any pay for it, that's a different kettle of fish.”
Diana Gabaldon, Written in My Own Heart's Blood

Diana Gabaldon
“Alive, and one. We are one, and while we love, death will never touch us. 'The grave's a fine and private place/ but none, I think, do there embrace.”
Diana Gabaldon, Dragonfly in Amber

Diana Gabaldon
“Comment sont vos selles, grandpere? - Germain to Jamie.”
Diana Gabaldon, The Fiery Cross

Diana Gabaldon
“I always wake when you do, Sassenach; I sleep ill without ye by my side.”
Diana Gabaldon, The Fiery Cross

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