Quotes About Opposites

Quotes tagged as "opposites" (showing 1-30 of 56)
John Steinbeck
“What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.”
John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America

Jodi Picoult
“You couldn't have strength without weakness, you couldn't have light without dark, you couldn't have love without loss”
Jodi Picoult, The Tenth Circle

Lisa Schroeder
“When you meet someone so different from yourself, in a good way, you don't even have to kiss to have fireworks go off. It's like fireworks in your heart all the time. I always wondered, do opposites really attract? Now I know for sure they do. I'd grown up going to the library as often as most people go to the grocery store. Jackson didn't need to read about exciting people or places. He went out and found them, or created excitement himself if there wasn't any to be found. The things I like are pretty simple. Burning CDs around themes, like Songs to Get You Groove On and Tunes to Fix a Broken Heart; watching movies; baking cookies; and swimming. It's like I was a salad with a light vinaigrette, and Jackson was a platter of seafood Cajun pasta. Alone, we were good. Together, we were fantastic.”
Lisa Schroeder, I Heart You, You Haunt Me

Konstantin Jireček
“We, the unwilling, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing.”
Konstantin Jireček

E.E. Cummings

"If freckles were lovely, and day was night,
And measles were nice and a lie warn't a lie,
Life would be delight,--
But things couldn't go right
For in such a sad plight
I wouldn't be I.

If earth was heaven and now was hence,
And past was present, and false was true,
There might be some sense
But I'd be in suspense
For on such a pretense
You wouldn't be you.

If fear was plucky, and globes were square,
And dirt was cleanly and tears were glee
Things would seem fair,--
Yet they'd all despair,
For if here was there
We wouldn't be we.”
E.E. Cummings

Hermann Hesse
“So you find yourself surrounded by death and horror in the world, and you escape it into lust. But lust has no duration; it leaves you again in the desert.”
Hermann Hesse, Narcissus and Goldmund

“I hadn't been able to trust since the age of four. I was torn between wanting to be cradled and telling the world to go fuck itself, and those were opposite sides of the same coin.”
Betsy Lerner, Food and Loathing: A Life Measured Out in Calories

H. Rider Haggard
“Man doeth this and doeth that from the good or evil of his heart; but he knows not to what end his sense doth prompt him; for when he strikes he is blind to where the blow shall fall, nor can he count the airy threads that weave the web of circumstance. Good and evil, love and hate, night and day, sweet and bitter, man and woman, heaven above and the earth beneath--all those things are needful, one to the other, and who knows the end of each?”
H. Rider Haggard, She

Michael Moorcock
“Elric knew that everything that existed had its opposite. In danger he might find peace. And yet, of course, in peace there was danger. Being an imperfect creature in an imperfect world he would always know paradox. And that was why in paradox there was always a kind of truth. That was why philosophers and soothsayers flourished. In a perfect world there would be no place for them. In an imperfect world the mysteries were always without solution and that was why there was always a great choice of solutions.”
Michael Moorcock, The Elric Saga Part I

“The kitchen. The bathroom. The yin and yang of the household.”
David C. Holley, Write like no one is reading

Jennifer E. Smith
“And the geography of the thing--the geography of them--was completely and hopelessly wrong.”
Jennifer E. Smith, The Geography of You and Me

Criss Jami
“Faith, in its most correct form, never removes responsibility; it removes fear of responsibility. The results are complete opposites with the greater saying, 'God's will is my delight.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Wilkie Collins
“If you will look about you (which most people won't do)," says Sergeant Cuff, "you will see that the nature of a man's tastes is, most times, as opposite as possible to the nature of a man's business.”
Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone

“As contraries are known by contraries, so is the delights of presence best known by the torments of absence.”

Bryant McGill
“Worry is the opposite of power.”
Bryant McGill, Simple Reminders: Inspiration for Living Your Best Life

Ashly Lorenzana
“Experience is the opposite of education.”
Ashly Lorenzana

Solange nicole
“The rough must always accompany the smooth. Without one or the other one learns nothing about oneself.”
Solange nicole

“A beam or pillar can be used to batter down a city wall, but it is no good for stopping up a little hole - this refers to a difference in function. Thoroughbreds like Qiji and Hualiu could gallop a thousand li in one day, but when it came to catching rats they were no match for the wildcat or the weasel - this refers to a difference in skill. The horned owl catches fleas at night and can spot the tip of a hair, but when daylight comes, no matter how wide it opens its eyes, it cannot see a mound or a hill - this refers to a difference in nature. Now do you say, that you are going to make Right your master and do away with Wrong, or make Order your master and do away with Disorder? If you do, then you have not understood the principle of heaven and earth or the nature of the ten thousand things. This is like saying that you are going to make Heaven your master and do away with Earth, or make Yin your master and do away with Yang. Obviously it is impossible.”
Zhuangzi, The Complete Works of Chuang Tzu

C.G. Jung
“But there is no energy unless there is a tension of opposites; hence it is necessary to discover the opposite to the attitude of the conscious mind.”
C.G. Jung, The Essential Jung: Selected Writings

“-There must be balance. Action and reaction. Chaos and order. Death and life.”
Lanie Bross, Chaos

راغب السرجاني
“وبضدها تتميز الأشياء”
راغب السرجاني, فن التعامل النبوي مع غير المسلمين

“The being of any group from the point of view of the group members themselves is very curious. If I think of you and him as together with me, and others again as not with me, I have already formed two rudimentary syntheses, namely, We and Them. However, this private act of synthesis is not in itself a group. In order that We come into being as a group, it is necessary not only that I regard, let us say, you and him and me as We, but that you and he also think of us as We. I shall call such an act of experiencing a number of persons as a single collectivity, an act of rudimentary group synthesis.”
R. D. Laing

“Words were his delight;
Hers, a gay gracefulness
Of dancing and moving.
But when to the place
Of deep loving
(Starlight at midnight)
At last they came,
Their full communion
And consummation,
Their complete sphere,
Was stillness for her,
Silence for him.”
Theodore Spencer

“What a nuisance is the friend who must have this and that, whose likes and hates are infinite, with bitter and loud voiced complaint about the whole of circumstance? How pleasant are the truly great who, wanting nothing, are content with anything. Accepting all things in a world of illusion as born of cause-effect they live in a mind above the opposites, and we call them great because they do so.”
Christmas Humphreys, The Buddhist Way Of Life

“The comprehensive mind is always dialectical.”
Plato, The Republic

“As he stood in the darkness, his eyes glistened and that’s when I knew my light found its traction.”
Dominic Riccitello

Bryant McGill
“The trappings of success bring the opposite of success in the ways most meaningful to people's lives.”
Bryant McGill, Simple Reminders: Inspiration for Living Your Best Life

Emily Brontë
“As different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

David Graeber
“The basic principle of structural analysis, I was explaining, is that the terms of a symbolic system do not stand in isolation—they are not to be thought of in terms of what they 'stand for,' but are defined by their relations to each other. One has to first define the field, and then look for elements in that field that are systematic inversions of each other. Take vampires. First you place them: vampires are stock figures in American horror movies. American horror movies constitute a kind of cosmology, a universe unto themselves. Then you ask: what, within this cosmos, is the opposite of a vampire? The answer is obvious. The opposite of a vampire is a werewolf. On one level they are the same: they are both monsters that can bite you and, biting you, turn you, too, into one of their own kind. In most other ways each is an exact inversion of the other. Vampires are rich. They are typically aristocrats. Werewolves are always poor. Vampires are fixed in space: they have castles or crypts that they have to retreat to during the daytime; werewolves are usually homeless derelicts, travelers, or otherwise on the run. Vampires control other creatures (bats, wolves, humans that they hypnotize or render thralls). Werewolves can't control themselves. Yet—and this is really the clincher in this case—each can be destroyed only by its own negation: vampires, by a stake, a simple sharpened stick that peasants use to construct fences; werewolves, by a silver bullet, something literally made from money.”
David Graeber, The Utopia of Rules: On Technology, Stupidity, and the Secret Joys of Bureaucracy

« previous 1
All Quotes | My Quotes | Add A Quote

Browse By Tag