Quotes About Mr Darcy

Quotes tagged as "mr-darcy" (showing 1-30 of 52)
Jane Austen
“In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.”
Jane Austen, Pride And Prejudice

Helen Fielding
“It struck me as pretty ridiculous to be called Mr. Darcy and to stand on your own looking snooty at a party. It's like being called Heathcliff and insisting on spending the entire evening in the garden, shouting "Cathy" and banging your head against a tree.”
Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones's Diary

Jane Austen
“You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding— certainly too little for the convenience of the world. I cannot forget the follies and vices of other so soon as I ought, nor their offenses against myself. My feelings are not puffed about with every attempt to move them. My temper would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Shannon L. Alder
“Never rearrange your life in order to meet Mr. Darcy half way. If he couldn’t see your worth at the moment you met then he won’t two years later. May the halls of Pemberly be filled with his regrets and your life filled with thankfulness because of this revelation.”
Shannon L. Alder

Deb Caletti
“It starts so young, and I'm angry about that. The garbage we're taught. About love, about what's "romantic." Look at so many of the so-called romantic figures in books and movies. Do we ever stop and think how many of them would cause serious and drastic unhappiness after The End? Why are sick and dangerous personality types so often shown a passionate and tragic and something to be longed for when those are the very ones you should run for your life from? Think about it. Heathcliff. Romeo. Don Juan. Jay Gatsby. Rochester. Mr. Darcy. From the rigid control freak in The Sound of Music to all the bad boys some woman goes running to the airport to catch in the last minute of every romantic comedy. She should let him leave. Your time is so valuable, and look at these guys--depressive and moody and violent and immature and self-centered. And what about the big daddy of them all, Prince Charming? What was his secret life? We dont know anything about him, other then he looks good and comes to the rescue.”
Deb Caletti, The Secret Life of Prince Charming

Jane Austen
“She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner." (Elizabeth Bennett)”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride - where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Elizabeth's spirit's soon rising to playfulness again, she wanted Mr. Darcy to account for his having ever fallen in love with her. 'How could you begin?' said she.
'I can comprehend your going on charmingly, when you had once made a beginning; but what could set you off in the first place?' 'I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again.”
Jane Austen

Jane Austen
“I will only add, God bless you.”
Jane Austen

Jane Austen
“I am happier than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh. Mr. Darcy sends you all the love in the world, that he can spare from me.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I have the highest respect for your nerves, they are my old friends.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“My object then," replied Darcy, "was to show you, by every civility in my power, that I was not so mean as to resent the past; and I hoped to obtain your forgiveness, to lessen your ill opinion, by letting you see that your reproofs had been attended to. How soon any other wishes introduced themselves I can hardly tell, but I believe in about half an hour after I had seen you.”
Jane Austen

Jane Austen
“The power of doing any thing with quickness is always much prized by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance. - Mr Darcy”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“It's a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles, for you are wasting your time with me.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Monica Fairview
“Never let yourself be swayed by emotions,' her mother had said. 'Emotions are fleeting. They come and go. But reality stays with you forever.”
Monica Fairview, The Other Mr. Darcy

Mary Lydon Simonsen
“‎Does anyone truly understand females? ...Their behavior is opposite of everything in the natural order and flies in the face of logic.”
Mary Lydon Simonsen, The Perfect Bride for Mr. Darcy

Steve Hockensmith
“Failure is but the longer road to triumph.”
Steve Hockensmith, Dreadfully Ever After

Lindsay Eland
“And always John, who is my own Gilbert Blythe, my real life Mr. Darcy, and the love of my life.”
Lindsay Eland

Marsha Altman
“I didn't say what kind of book. You have a foul mind Bingley."
"Don't mock me on my sister's wedding day!"
"I mocked you on yours; I hardly see how this is as bad," was Darcy's reply.”
Marsha Altman, The Darcys & the Bingleys

Nicola Yoon
“Olly: jesus. is there a girl on this planet who doesn't love mr.darcy
Madeline: All girls love Mr. Darcy?
Olly: are you kidding? even my sister loves darcy and she doesn't love anybody
Madeline: She must love somebody. I'm sure she loves you
Olly: what's so great about darcy?
Madeline: That's not a serious question
Olly: he's a snob
Madeline: But he overcomes it and eventually realizes that character matters more than class! He's a man open to learning life's lessons! Also, he's completely gorgeous and noble and brooding and poetic. Did I mention gorgeous? Also, he loves Elizabeth beyond all reason.”
Nicola Yoon, Everything, Everything

Abigail Reynolds
“I don't want your duty kisses. They taste bitter”
Abigail Reynolds, Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy: The Last Man in the World

Marsha Altman
“I was of course discussing the book of Leviticus. I don't know why your mind is so filthy these days, Bingley.


Marsha Altman, The Darcys & the Bingleys

Jane Austen
“If you will thank me," he replied, "let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you might add force to the other inducements which led me on, I shall not attempt to deny. But your family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought only of you."

Elizabeth was too much embarrassed to say a word. After a short pause, her companion added, "You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever."

Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances.The happiness which this reply produced was such as he had probably never felt before, and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Seth Grahame-Smith
“... Miss Bingley was left to the satisfaction of having forced him to say what gave no one any pain but herself.”
Seth Grahame-Smith, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

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