Quotes About Memory Loss

Quotes tagged as "memory-loss" (showing 1-30 of 64)
Juan Rulfo
“Nothing can last forever. There isn't any memory, no matter how intense, that doesn't fade out at last.”
Juan Rulfo

Mark  Lawrence
“Memory is all we are. Moments and feelings, captured in amber, strung on filaments of reason. Take a man’s memories and you take all of him. Chip away a memory at a time and you destroy him as surely as if you hammered nail after nail through his skull.”
Mark Lawrence, King of Thorns

Khaled Hosseini
“She would grab whatever she could -a look , a whisper , a moan - to salvage from perishing , to perserve. But time is most unforgivving of fires , and she couldn't , in the end , save it all .”
Khaled Hosseini, A Thousand Splendid Suns

Erica Bauermeister
“I am starting to think that maybe memories are like this dessert. I eat it, and it becomes a part of me, whether I remember it later or not.”
Erica Bauermeister, The School of Essential Ingredients

Haruki Murakami
“And as the years have passed, the time has grown longer. The sad truth is that what I could recall in five seconds all too needed ten, then thirty, then a full minute - like shadows lengthening at dusk. Someday, I suppose, the shadows will be swallowed up in darkness.”
Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood

Philip Roth
“And since we don’t just forget things because they don’t matter but also forget things because they matter too much because each of us remembers and forgets in a pattern whose labyrinthine windings are an identification mark no less distinctive than a fingerprint's, it’s no wonder that the shards of reality one person will cherish as a biography can seem to someone else who, say, happened to have eaten some ten thousand dinners at the very same kitchen table, to be a willful excursion into mythomania”
Philip Roth, American Pastoral

Julie Kagawa
“It would be dreadfully
ironic, I mused, if once I earned a soul, I forgot everything about being fey, including all my memories of her. That sort of ending seemed
appropriately tragic; the smitten fey creature becomes human but forgets why he wanted to in the first place. Old fairy tales loved that sort of irony.”
Julie Kagawa

“We are what we remember. If we lose our memory, we lose our identity and our identity is the accumulation of our experiences. When we walk down the memory lane, it can be unconsciously, willingly, selectively, impetuously or sometimes grudgingly. By following our stream of consciousness we look for lost time and things past. Some reminiscences become anchor points that can take another scope with the wisdom of hindsight. ("Walking down the memory lane" )”
Erik Pevernagie

Paul Simon
“Time it was
And what a time it was, it was
A time of innocence
A time of confidences

Long ago it must be
I have a photograph
Preserve your memories
They're all that's left you”
Paul Simon, Lyrics 1964-2008

Norman Doidge
“Not all activities are equal in this regard. Those that involve genuine concentration—studying a musical instrument, playing board games, reading, and dancing—are associated with a lower risk for dementia. Dancing, which requires learning new moves, is both physically and mentally challenging and requires much concentration. Less intense activities, such as bowling, babysitting, and golfing, are not associated with a reduced incidence of Alzheimer’s. (254)”
Norman Doidge

Louise Erdrich
“...Grandpa's mind had left us, gone wild and wary. When I walked with him I could feel how strange it was. His thoughts swam between us, hidden under rocks, disappearing in weeds, and I was fishing for them, dangling my own words like baits and lures.”
Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine

D.D. Barant
“Deep spirit scanning,” Eisfanger says. His voice has a strange resonance to it, like I’m hearing him through a bad phone connection. “Don’t worry, it’s completely safe. Well, mostly.”

Mostly?

“Side effects have been documented,” he admits. “In a very small percentage of cases. Less than two percent.”

“What kind of side effects?” Suddenly I’m feeling nauseous. Feels like the ants are crawling around inside me now, which is exactly as disturbing as it sounds.

“Memory loss. Synesthesia. And occasionally … vestigial growths.”

“So I could forget my own name, start smelling purple everywhere and have an extra nipple sprout from my forehead?”
D.D. Barant, Back from the Undead

Erica Bauermeister
“I've been wondering," Isabelle commented reflectively over dessert, "if it is foolish to make new memories when you know you are going to lose them.”
Erica Bauermeister, The School of Essential Ingredients

Tessa Shaffer
“Heaven left a hole in your heart.

But it’s up to you to choose if that hole will be filled with pain, anger, and the eternal darkness of loss . . .
Or if you will choose to fill it with light and love and have that hole shine out of you like a spotlight into your life, keeping their memory alive . . .

{It’s up to you.}”
Tessa Shaffer, Heaven Has No Regrets

“We are often given pills or fluids to help remedy illness, yet little has been taught to us about the power of smell to do the exact same thing. It is known that the scent of fresh rosemary increases memory, but this cure for memory loss is not divulged by doctors to help the elderly. I also know that the most effective use of the blue lotus flower is not from its dilution with wine or tea – but from its scent. To really maximize the positive effects of the blue lily (or the pink lotus), it must be sniffed within minutes of plucking. This is why it is frequently shown being sniffed by my ancient ancestors on the walls of temples and on papyrus. Even countries across the Orient share the same imagery. The sacred lotus not only creates a relaxing sensation of euphoria, and increases vibrations of the heart, but also triggers genetic memory - and good memory with an awakened heart ushers wisdom.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

“Dissociative identity disorder is conceptualized as a childhood onset, posttraumatic developmental disorder in which the child is unable to consolidate a unified sense of self. Detachment from emotional and physical pain during trauma can result in alterations in memory encoding and storage. In turn, this leads to fragmentation and compartmentalization of memory and impairments in retrieving memory.2,4,19 Exposure to early, usually repeated trauma results in the creation of discrete behavioral states that can persist and, over later development, become elaborated, ultimately developing into the alternate identities of dissociative identity disorder.”
Bethany L. Brand

“Bunnu was no amateur when it came to escape. And even in his drowsiest moments, he understood implicitly that to forget his circumstances, even for a short while, meant first to forget himself. Who he was and why he was—to strip it all bare and start from scratch, as it were. In his nearly 250 years of life and, now, as an old emaciated man completely estranged from his family and closest friends—albeit more by circumstance than by choice—he understood the importance of this process and revered it, for there were far greater things to be done and achieved in the dark, uncertain areas of existence than in those circumscribed—and thereby strained—by comprehensibility.”
Ashim Shanker, Only the Deplorable

Elizabeth Langston
“Memory loss is strange. It’s like showing up for a movie after it’s started. I’m sure I’ve missed something. I don’t know if it’s important or not. So I do the best I can to lose myself in the story and hope the gaps don’t matter. Later, I can look it up, or someone will remind me, or maybe it’s perfectly fine to not know.”
Elizabeth Langston, Wishing for You

Sherry Thomas
“You might be the scariest girl I've ever met," he told her.
"Let's not be dramatic," she said drily. "I'm the only girl you can remember ever meeting.”
Sherry Thomas, The Perilous Sea

Janet Turpin Myers
“Was the dementia of old age a blessing in disguise? No more thoughts. No more damage inflicted. No more memories of damage survived.”
Janet Turpin Myers, the last year of confusion

Fredric Brown
“Fortunately, I have forgotten most of the things that have happened to me. Fortunately, the mind has a limited capacity for remembering. It would be horrible if I remembered the details of a hundred and eighty thousand years—the details of four thousand lifetimes that I have lived since the first great atomic war.”
Fredric Brown, Letter to a Phoenix

Melissa Hill
“With some stories, you really can't rush things. And it's often best just to sit back and enjoy the journey for what it is.”
Melissa Hill, A Gift to Remember

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“Saying that you do not remember something or someone is a less embarrassing or hurtful way of saying that you do not know it or them anymore.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

“I’ve concluded that families of those with Alzheimer’s come in four distinct categories.
1. The first group is one we see the most. They laugh and visit the best they can, still enjoying the company of the person they love.
2. The second group comes a little less often. Instead of laughter, they may be brought to tears.
3. The third group sits mortified, frozen by their surroundings, near as helpless as the person they’ve come to visit.
To all of these people I say, “Thank you.”
4. The last group we don’t see because they are never here. There are instances where these families simply do not exist, but too often the hard truth is that they are busy elsewhere.”
Charles Shoenfeld

“In this chapter I restrict myself to exploring the nature of the amnesia which is reported between personality states in most people who are diagnosed with DID. Note that this is not an explicit diagnostic criterion, although such amnesia features strongly in the public view of DID, particularly in the form of the fugue-like conditions depicted in films of the condition, such as The Three Faces of Eve (1957). Typically, when one personality state, or ‘alter’, takes over from another, they have no idea what happened just before. They report having lost time, and often will have no idea where they are or how they got there. However, this is not a universal feature of DID. It happens that with certain individuals with DID, one personality state can retrieve what happened when another was in control. In other cases we have what is described as ‘co-consciousness’ where one personality state can apparently monitor what is happening when another personality state is in control and, in certain circumstances, can take over the conversation.”
John Morton, Trauma, Dissociation and Multiplicity: Working on Identity and Selves

Federico Andahazi
“No existen recuerdos más activos y vigorosos que aquellos que se esconden detrás del velo misterioso de la amnesia.”
Federico Andahazi, Los amantes bajo el Danubio

“A mind wanders, thoughts flee and memories fade. But tattoos, tattoos are forever. And if it is true to say that we carry ourselves with when we travel - then the body may very well be a beautiful canvas for the timeless lessons we learn and will learn when we travel.”
lauren klarfeld

Nicole Krauss
“But how can one regret what, to the mind, has never existed? Even loss is an inaccurate description, for what loss is without the awareness of losing?”
Nicole Krauss

“ذاكرتي ضعيفة أعذرني لا أعرفك ، ألست من قال عني مجنون ؟ لايبدو عليَّ النسيان ، سبقني بك الكلام ، هل أنت صاحب النسيان ؟؟”
Sam Houssami

C. Robert Cargill
“I don't remember her. But she feels special. There's this hole in my heart every time I draw her; you know, a sick sort of feeling. Like she's someone I lost.”
C. Robert Cargill, Dreams and Shadows

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