Quotes About Mankind

Quotes tagged as "mankind" (showing 1-30 of 677)
I love mankind ... it's people I can't stand!!
I love mankind ... it's people I can't stand!!”
Charles M. Schulz, The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 5: 1959-1960

Albert Camus
“Man is the only creature who refuses to be what he is.”
Albert Camus

Albert Camus
“Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.”
Albert Camus

Voltaire
“It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets.”
Voltaire

Rick Riordan
“It's funny how humans can wrap their mind around things and fit them into their version of reality.”
Rick Riordan, The Lightning Thief

Rick Riordan
“Humans see what they want to see.”
Rick Riordan, The Lightning Thief

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“People speak sometimes about the "bestial" cruelty of man, but that is terribly unjust and offensive to beasts, no animal could ever be so cruel as a man, so artfully, so artistically cruel.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“I love mankind, he said, "but I find to my amazement that the more I love mankind as a whole, the less I love man in particular.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

Woody Allen
“God is silent. Now if only man would shut up.”
Woody Allen

Dalai Lama XIV
“Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive.”
Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness

Bertolt Brecht
“The human race tends to remember the abuses to which it has been subjected rather than the endearments. What's left of kisses? Wounds, however, leave scars.”
Bertolt Brecht

John Donne
“No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were: any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee.”
John Donne, No man is an island – A selection from the prose

Sigmund Freud
“It sounds like a fairy-tale, but not only that; this story of what man by his science and practical inventions has achieved on this earth, where he first appeared as a weakly member of the animal kingdom, and on which each individual of his species must ever again appear as a helpless infant... is a direct fulfilment of all, or of most, of the dearest wishes in his fairy-tales. All these possessions he has acquired through culture. Long ago he formed an ideal conception of omnipotence and omniscience which he embodied in his gods. Whatever seemed unattainable to his desires - or forbidden to him - he attributed to these gods. One may say, therefore, that these gods were the ideals of his culture. Now he has himself approached very near to realizing this ideal, he has nearly become a god himself. But only, it is true, in the way that ideals are usually realized in the general experience of humanity. Not completely; in some respects not at all, in others only by halves. Man has become a god by means of artificial limbs, so to speak, quite magnificent when equipped with all his accessory organs; but they do not grow on him and they still give him trouble at times... Future ages will produce further great advances in this realm of culture, probably inconceivable now, and will increase man's likeness to a god still more.”
Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents

Sigmund Freud
“In the depths of my heart I can’t help being convinced that my dear fellow-men, with a few exceptions, are worthless.”
Sigmund Freud, Letters of Sigmund Freud, 1873-1939

Mark Twain
“What is Man? Man is a noisome bacillus whom Our Heavenly Father created because he was disappointed in the monkey.”
Mark Twain

Epictetus
“Man is not worried by real problems so much as by his imagined anxieties about real problems”
Epictetus

Kurt Vonnegut
“The Fourteenth Book is entitled, "What can a Thoughtful Man Hope for Mankind on Earth, Given the Experience of the Past Million Years?"
It doesn't take long to read The Fourteenth Book. It consists of one word and a period.
This is it: "Nothing.”
Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle

E.B. White
“I am pessimistic about the human race because it is too ingenious for its own good. Our approach to nature is to beat it into submission. We would stand a better chance of survival if we accommodated ourselves to this planet and viewed it appreciatively, instead of skeptically and dictatorially.”
E.B. White

H.P. Lovecraft
“Religion is still useful among the herd - that it helps their orderly conduct as nothing else could. The crude human animal is in-eradicably superstitious, and there is every biological reason why they should be.
Take away his Christian god and saints, and he will worship something else...”
H.P. Lovecraft

André Gide
“I do not love men: I love what devours them.”
André Gide, Prometheus Illbound

Jeannette Walls
“Nobody's perfect. We're all just one step up from the beasts and one step down from the angels.”
Jeannette Walls, Half Broke Horses

David McCullough
“To me, history ought to be a source of pleasure. It isn't just part of our civic responsibility. To me, it's an enlargement of the experience of being alive, just the way literature or art or music is."

[The Title Always Comes Last; NEH 2003 Jefferson Lecturer interview profile]”
David McCullough

Jack London
“The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.”
Jack London

C. JoyBell C.
“The only problem with her is that she is too perfect. She is bad in a way that entices, and good in a way that comforts. She is mischief but then she is the warmth of home. The dreams of the wild and dangerous but the memories of childhood and gladness. She is perfection. And when given something perfect, it is the nature of man to dedicate his mind to finding something wrong with it and then when he is able to find something wrong with it, he rejoices in his find, and sees only the flaw, becoming blind to everything else! And this is why man is never given anything that is perfect, because when given the imperfect and the ugly, man will dedicate his mind to finding what is good with the imperfect and upon finding one thing good with the extremely flawed, he will only see the one thing good, and no longer see everything that is ugly. And so....man complains to God for having less than what he wants... but this is the only thing that man can handle. Man cannot handle what is perfect. It is the nature of the mortal to rejoice over the one thing that he can proudly say that he found on his own, with no help from another, whether it be a shadow in a perfect diamond, or a faint beautiful reflection in an extremely dull mirror.”
C. JoyBell C.

Primo Levi
“I am constantly amazed by man's inhumanity to man.”
Primo Levi, If This Is a Man / The Truce

Stanisław Lem
“Man has gone out to explore other worlds and other civilizations without having explored his own labyrinth of dark passages and secret chambers, and without finding what lies behind doorways that he himself has sealed.”
Stanisław Lem, Solaris

H.P. Lovecraft
“The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear.”
H.P. Lovecraft

John Quincy Adams
“In charity to all mankind, bearing no malice or ill will to any human being, and even compassionating those who hold in bondage their fellow men, not knowing what they do.”
John Quincy Adams

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“The whole work of man really seems to consist in nothing but proving to himself every minute that he is a man and not a piano key.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground

Immanuel Kant
“Laziness and cowardice are the reasons why so great a portion of mankind, after nature has long since discharged them from external direction (naturaliter maiorennes), nevertheless remains under lifelong tutelage, and why it is so easy for others to set themselves up as their guardians. It is so easy not to be of age. If I have a book which understands for me, a pastor who has a conscience for me, a physician who decides my diet, and so forth, I need not trouble myself. I need not think, if I can only pay - others will easily undertake the irksome work for me.

That the step to competence is held to be very dangerous by the far greater portion of mankind...”
Immanuel Kant, An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment?

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