Quotes About Letter Writing

Quotes tagged as "letter-writing" (showing 1-30 of 32)
Haruki Murakami
“I'll write to you. A super-long letter, like in an old-fashioned novel”
Haruki Murakami, After Dark

Haruki Murakami
“How wonderful it is to be able to write someone a letter! To feel like conveying your thoughts to a person, to sit at your desk and pick up a pen, to put your thoughts into words like this is truly marvelous.”
Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood

Lewis Carroll
“The proper definition of a man is an animal that writes letters.”
Lewis Carroll

Emily Dickinson
“A letter always seemed to me like immortality because it is the mind alone without corporeal friend.”
Emily Dickinson

“Harry’s letter to his daughter:

If I could give you just one thing, I’d want it to be a simple truth that took me many years to learn. If you learn it now, it may enrich your life in hundreds of ways. And it may prevent you from facing many problems that have hurt people who have never learned it.

The truth is simply this: No one owes you anything.

Significance

How could such a simple statement be important? It may not seem so, but understanding it can bless your entire life.

No one owes you anything.

It means that no one else is living for you, my child. Because no one is you. Each person is living for himself; his own happiness is all he can ever personally feel.

When you realize that no one owes you happiness or anything else, you’ll be freed from expecting what isn’t likely to be.

It means no one has to love you. If someone loves you, it’s because there’s something special about you that gives him happiness. Find out what that something special is and try to make it stronger in you, so that you’ll be loved even more.

When people do things for you, it’s because they want to — because you, in some way, give them something meaningful that makes them want to please you, not because anyone owes you anything.

No one has to like you. If your friends want to be with you, it’s not out of duty. Find out what makes others happy so they’ll want to be near you.

No one has to respect you. Some people may even be unkind to you. But once you realize that people don’t have to be good to you, and may not be good to you, you’ll learn to avoid those who would harm you. For you don’t owe them anything either.

Living your Life

No one owes you anything.

You owe it to yourself to be the best person possible. Because if you are, others will want to be with you, want to provide you with the things you want in exchange for what you’re giving to them.

Some people will choose not to be with you for reasons that have nothing to do with you. When that happens, look elsewhere for the relationships you want. Don’t make someone else’s problem your problem.

Once you learn that you must earn the love and respect of others, you’ll never expect the impossible and you won’t be disappointed. Others don’t have to share their property with you, nor their feelings or thoughts.

If they do, it’s because you’ve earned these things. And you have every reason to be proud of the love you receive, your friends’ respect, the property you’ve earned. But don’t ever take them for granted. If you do, you could lose them. They’re not yours by right; you must always earn them.

My Experience

A great burden was lifted from my shoulders the day I realized that no one owes me anything. For so long as I’d thought there were things I was entitled to, I’d been wearing myself out —physically and emotionally — trying to collect them.

No one owes me moral conduct, respect, friendship, love, courtesy, or intelligence. And once I recognized that, all my relationships became far more satisfying. I’ve focused on being with people who want to do the things I want them to do.

That understanding has served me well with friends, business associates, lovers, sales prospects, and strangers. It constantly reminds me that I can get what I want only if I can enter the other person’s world. I must try to understand how he thinks, what he believes to be important, what he wants. Only then can I appeal to someone in ways that will bring me what I want.

And only then can I tell whether I really want to be involved with someone. And I can save the important relationships for th”
Harry Browne

Ford Madox Ford
“He wouldn't write a letter because he couldn't without beginning it 'Dear Sylvia' and ending it 'Yours sincerely' or 'truly' or 'affectionately.' He's that sort of precise imbecile. I tell you he's so formal he can't do without all the conventions there are and so truthful he can't use half of them.”
Ford Madox Ford, Parade's End

Susan Lendroth
“To write is human, to receive a letter: Devine!”
Susan Lendroth

Soraya Diase Coffelt
“Letter writing can be seen as a gift because someone has taken his/her time to write and think and express love.”
Soraya Diase Coffelt

Jane Austen
“Every body allows that the talent of writing agreeable letters is peculiarly female.”
Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

Fennel Hudson
“By the time you read this letter, these words will be those of the past. The me of now is gone.”
Fennel Hudson, A Writer's Year - Fennel's Journal - No. 3

A.R. Gurney
“Andy: Most of the things I did with her partly in mind. And if I said or did an inauthentic thing, I could almost hear her groaning over my shoulder. But now she's gone and I really don't know how I'll get along without her.
Melissa: (Looking at him for the first time.) You'll survive, Andy...
Andy: I have a wonderful wife, fine children, and a place in the world I feel proud of, but the death of Melissa suddenly leaves a huge gap in my life...
Melissa: Oh now, Andy...
Andy: The thought of never again being able to write to her, to connect to her, to get some signal back from her, fills me with an emptiness which is hard to describe.
Melissa: Now Andy, stop...
Andy: I don't think there are many men in this world who have had the benefit of such a friendship with such a woman. But it was more than friendship, too. I know now that I loved her. I loved her even from the day I met her, when she walked into second grade, looking like the lost princess of Oz.
Melissa: Oh, Andy, PLEASE. I can't bear it.
Andy: I don't think I've ever loved anyone the way I loved her, and I know I never will again. She was at the heart of my life, and already I miss her desperately. I just wanted to say this to you and to her. Sincerely, Andy Ladd.
Melissa: Thank you, Andy.”
A.R. Gurney, Love Letters

Jane Austen
“Every body at all addicted to letter writing, without having much to say, which will include a large proportion of the female world at least…”
Jane Austen, Mansfield Park

Delia Sherman
“All my life I have written letters - to our mother, our relatives, a wide circle of friends and acquaintance, to my husband, to you. Correspondence has always been as necessary to my happiness as a well-cooked dinner, and I've found it more sustaining for its generosity: an act of charity that returned to me a hundredfold...”
Delia Sherman, The Porcelain Dove

Edward Gorey
“where was I? in remarking that me is the envelopes and not nearly so much so, the often foolish letters inside.”
Edward Gorey, Floating Worlds: The Letters of Edward Gorey & Peter F. Neumeyer

Amélie Nothomb
“The nature of the epistolary genre was revealed to me: a form of writing devoted to another person. Novels, poems, and so on, were texts into which others were free to enter, or not. Letters, on the other hand, did not exist without the other person, and their very mission, their significance, was the epiphany of the recipient.”
Amélie Nothomb, Life Form

A.R. Gurney
“Andy: But they gave us an out in the Land of Oz. They made us write. They didn't make us write particularly well. And they didn't always give us important things to write about. But they did make us sit down, and organize our thoughts, and convey those thoughts on paper as clearly as we could to another person. Thank God for that. That saved us. Or at least it saved me. So I have to keep writing letters. If I can't write them to you, I have to write them to someone else. I don't think I could ever stop writing completely.”
A.R. Gurney, Love Letters

Emily Dickinson
“Susie, what shall I do - there is'nt room enough; not half enough, to hold what I was going to say. Wont you tell the man who makes sheets of paper, that I hav'nt the slightest respect for him!”
Emily Dickinson

Scribendi
“A letter is the most basic—yet the most flexible—mode of correspondence, regardless of its subject matter.”
Scribendi, How to Write a Letter

Susan Lendroth
“To write is human, to get mail: Devine!”
Susan Lendroth

A.R. Gurney
“Andy: Andrew Makepeace Ladd, the Third, accepts with pleasure the kind invitation of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Channing Gardner for a birthday party in honor of their daughter Melissa on April 19th, 1937 at half past three o'clock.
Melissa: Dear Andy: Thank you for the birthday present. I have a lot of Oz books, but not 'The Lost Princess of Oz.' What made you give me that one? Sincerely yours, Melissa.
Andy: I'm answering your letter about the book. When you came into second grade with that stuck-up nurse, you looked like a lost princess.
Melissa: I don't believe what you wrote. I think my mother told your mother to get that book. I like the pictures more than the words. Now let's stop writing letters.”
A.R. Gurney, Love Letters

Ernest Hemingway
“Don't you believe I love you? Don't know how I can make you believe. I didn't want to kiss you goodbye--that was the trouble--I wanted to kiss you goodnight. […] Of course I love you. I love you all the time. […] I'd like to hold you and kiss you so that you wouldn't doubt whether I wanted to or not.”
Ernest Hemingway

Mary Potter Kenyon
“The length of the friendship never brought astonishment. After all, the
majority of Baby Boomers could likely claim a long-standing friendship in their lives. No, it was always the letters: the-pen-on-paper, inside a-stamped-envelope, mailed-in-a-mailbox letter that was awe inspiring.
“You’ve been writing a letter every week for almost thirty years?”
The question always evokes disbelief, particularly since the dawn of the
Internet and email. We quickly correct the misconception.
“Well, at least one letter, but usually more. We write each other three or four letters a week. And we never wait for a return letter before beginning another.”
Conservatively speaking, at just three letters a week since 1987, that
would equal 4,368 letters each, but we’d both agree that estimate is much
too low. We have, on occasion, written each other two letters in a single
day.”
Mary Potter Kenyon, Mary & Me: A Lasting Link Through Ink

Yukio Mishima
“This time, Fusako was able to express herself with fluency and candor. The bold letters she had been writing week after week had granted her an unexpected new freedom.”
Yukio Mishima, The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea

Scribendi
“Becoming an effective letter writer means analyzing each situation individually and choosing the form of correspondence accordingly.”
Scribendi, How to Write a Letter

Elizabeth Gaskell
“Then letters came in but three times a week: indeed, in some places in Scotland where I have stayed when I was a girl, the post came in but once a month;—but letters were letters then; and we made great prizes of them, and read them and studied them like books. Now the post comes rattling in twice a day, bringing short jerky notes, some without beginning or end, but just a little sharp sentence, which well-bred folks would think too abrupt to be spoken.”
Elizabeth Gaskell, My Lady Ludlow

Clarice Lispector
“(...) às vezes não se tem o que escrever mesmo quando se tem o que falar.”
Clarice Lispector

“I folded Lizzie into small pieces. But the letters did not stop.”
Sarah Schmidt, See What I Have Done

“In an era when letter writing is a diminished art, we have an opportunity to share this historical and literary treasure trove in The Selected Letters of Laura Ingalls Wilder. This book is both a reminder of a bygone era of genuine communication and another visit with Laura Ingalls Wilder, pioneer and author.”
William Anderson, The Selected Letters of Laura Ingalls Wilder

Knut Hamsun
“Deres KH
Deres KH menes Deres KH. Altsaa Knut Kongsberg. Deres Knut Kongsberg, Kongsbergknuten Deres, forstaar De.”
Knut Hamsun

Charlotte Brontë
“He wrote because he liked to write; he did not abridge, because he cared not to abridge. He sat down, he took pen and paper, because he loved Lucy and had much to say to her; because he was faithful and thoughtful, because he was tender and true.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

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