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Quotes About Ireland

Quotes tagged as "ireland" (showing 1-30 of 123)
C.E. Murphy
“In Ireland, you go to someone's house, and she asks you if you want a cup of tea. You say no, thank you, you're really just fine. She asks if you're sure. You say of course you're sure, really, you don't need a thing. Except they pronounce it ting. You don't need a ting. Well, she says then, I was going to get myself some anyway, so it would be no trouble. Ah, you say, well, if you were going to get yourself some, I wouldn't mind a spot of tea, at that, so long as it's no trouble and I can give you a hand in the kitchen. Then you go through the whole thing all over again until you both end up in the kitchen drinking tea and chatting.

In America, someone asks you if you want a cup of tea, you say no, and then you don't get any damned tea.

I liked the Irish way better.”
C.E. Murphy, Urban Shaman

Iris Murdoch
“I think being a woman is like being Irish... Everyone says you're important and nice, but you take second place all the time.”
Iris Murdoch

James Joyce
“Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

Maggie Stiefvater
“It is the first day of November and so, today, someone will die.”
Maggie Stiefvater, The Scorpio Races

Nora Roberts
“The tune was sad, as the best of Ireland was, melancholy and lovely as a lover's tears.”
Nora Roberts, Born in Fire

Daniel Patrick Moynihan
“To be Irish is to know that in the end the world will break your heart.”
Daniel Patrick Moynihan

W.B. Yeats
“THAT crazed girl improvising her music.
Her poetry, dancing upon the shore,

Her soul in division from itself
Climbing, falling She knew not where,
Hiding amid the cargo of a steamship,
Her knee-cap broken, that girl I declare
A beautiful lofty thing, or a thing
Heroically lost, heroically found.

No matter what disaster occurred
She stood in desperate music wound,
Wound, wound, and she made in her triumph
Where the bales and the baskets lay
No common intelligible sound
But sang, 'O sea-starved, hungry sea”
W.B. Yeats, The Collected Poems

James Joyce
“The sea, the snotgreen sea, the scrotumtightening sea.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

James Joyce
“My heart is quite calm now. I will go back.”
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Bernie Mcgill
“Some ghosts are so quiet you would hardly know they were there.”
Bernie Mcgill, The Butterfly Cabinet

Pádraig Pearse
“Tír gan teanga, tír gan anam. A country without a language is a country without a soul.”
Pádraig Pearse

George Bernard Shaw
“The heart of an Irishman is nothing but his imagination”
George Bernard Shaw

W.B. Yeats
“Out of Ireland have we come.
Great hatred, little room,
Maimed us at the start.
I carry from my mother's womb
A fanatic heart.”
W.B. Yeats, The Collected Poems

Signe Pike
“In prehistoric times, early man was bowled over by natural events: rain, thunder, lightning, the violent shaking and moving of the ground, mountains spewing deathly hot lava, the glow of the moon, the burning heat of the sun, the twinkling of the stars. Our human brain searched for an answer, and the conclusion was that it all must be caused by something greater than ourselves - this, of course, sprouted the earliest seeds of religion. This theory is certainly reflected in faery lore. In the beautiful sloping hills of Connemara in Ireland, for example, faeries were believed to have been just as beautiful, peaceful, and pleasant as the world around them. But in the Scottish Highlands, with their dark, brooding mountains and eerie highland lakes, villagers warned of deadly water-kelpies and spirit characters that packed a bit more punch.”
Signe Pike, Faery Tale: One Woman's Search for Enchantment in a Modern World

Frank Harte
“Those in power write the history, while those who suffer write the songs.”
Frank Harte

W.H. Auden
“Mad Ireland hurt you into poetry.”
W.H. Auden

Peter Hitchens
“Americans may say they love our accents (I have been accused of sounding 'like Princess Di') but the more thoughtful ones resent and rather dislike us as a nation and people, as friends of mine have found out by being on the edge of conversations where Americans assumed no Englishmen were listening.

And it is the English, specifically, who are the targets of this. Few Americans have heard of Wales. All of them have heard of Ireland and many of them think they are Irish. Scotland gets a sort of free pass, especially since Braveheart re-established the Scots' anti-English credentials among the ignorant millions who get their history off the TV.”
Peter Hitchens

W.B. Yeats
“The Celt, and his cromlechs, and his pillar-stones, these will not change much – indeed, it is doubtful if anybody at all changes at any time. In spite of hosts of deniers, and asserters, and wise-men, and professors, the majority still are adverse to sitting down to dine thirteen at a table, or being helped to salt, or walking under a ladder, of seeing a single magpie flirting his chequered tale. There are, of course, children of light who have set their faces against all this, although even a newspaperman, if you entice him into a cemetery at midnight, will believe in phantoms, for everyone is a visionary, if you scratch him deep enough. But the Celt, unlike any other, is a visionary without scratching.”
W.B. Yeats

Flann O'Brien
“Moderation, we find, is an extremely difficult thing to get in this country.”
Flann O'Brien, The Best of Myles

Courtney Love
“[Kurt Cobain] had a lot of German in him. Some Irish. But no Jew. I think that if he had had a little Jew he would have [expletive] stuck it out.”
Courtney Love

The Script
“Take that rage, put it on a page, take the page to the stage, blow the roof off the place.”
The Script

“World is suddener than we fancy it.”
Louis MacNeice, Collected Poems of Louis MacNeice

Frank Delaney
“When I come out on the road of a morning, when I have had a night's sleep and perhaps a breakfast, and the sun lights a hill on the distance, a hill I know I shall walk across an hour or two thence, and it is green and silken to my eye, and the clouds have begun their slow, fat rolling journey across the sky, no land in the world can inspire such love in a common man.”
Frank Delaney, Ireland

James Joyce
“God and religion before every thing!' Dante cried. 'God and religion before the world.'

Mr Casey raised his clenched fist and brought it down on the table with a crash.

'Very well then,' he shouted hoarsely, 'if it comes to that, no God for Ireland!'

'John! John!' cried Mr Dedalus, seizing his guest by the coat sleeve.

Dante stared across the table, her cheeks shaking. Mr Casey struggled up from his chair and bent across the table towards her, scraping the air from before his eyes with one hand as though he were tearing aside a cobweb.

'No God for Ireland!' he cried, 'We have had too much God in Ireland. Away with God!”
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Thomas Moore
“Though the last glimpse of Erin with sorrow I see,
Yet wherever thou art shall seem Erin to me;
In exile thy bosom shall still be my home,
And thine eyes make my climate wherever we roam.”
Thomas Moore

Edward Rutherfurd
“So does nobody care about Ireland?"
"Nobody. Neither King Louis, nor King Billie, nor King James." He nodded thoughtfully. "The fate of Ireland will be decided by men not a single one of whom gives a damn about her. That is her tragedy.”
Edward Rutherfurd, The Rebels of Ireland

John McGahern
“They'd listen silenty, with grave faces: but once they'd turn to each other they'd smile cruelly. He couldn't have it both ways. He'd put himself outside and outside they'd make him stay. Neither brutality nor complaining could force a way in.”
John McGahern, The Dark

“...early medieval Ireland sounds like a somewhat crazed Wisconsin, in which every dairy farm is an armed camp at perpetual war with its neighbors, and every farmer claims he is a king.”
David Willis McCullough, Wars of the Irish Kings: A Thousand Years of Struggle, from the Age of Myth Through the Reign of Queen Elizabeth I

W.B. Yeats
“The host is rushing 'twixt day and night,
And where is there hope or deed as fair?
Caoilte tossing his burning hair,
And Niamh calling Away, come away.”
W.B. Yeats

Edward Rutherfurd
“True the greater part of the Irish people was close to starvation. The numbers of weakened people dying from disease were rising. So few potatoes had been planted that, even if they escaped bight, they would not be enough to feed the poor folk who relied upon them. More and more of those small tenants and cottagers, besides, were being forced off the land and into a condition of helpless destitution. Ireland, that is to say, was a country utterly prostrated.
Yet the Famine came to an end. And how was this wonderful thing accomplished? Why, in the simplest way imaginable. The famine was legislated out of existence. It had to be. The Whigs were facing a General Election.”
Edward Rutherfurd, The Rebels of Ireland

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