Quotes About Humanities

Quotes tagged as "humanities" (showing 1-30 of 34)
E.A. Bucchianeri
“You can’t enjoy art or books in a hurry.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Brushstrokes of a Gadfly

Terry Eagleton
“What we have witnessed in our own time is the death of universities as centres of critique. Since Margaret Thatcher, the role of academia has been to service the status quo, not challenge it in the name of justice, tradition, imagination, human welfare, the free play of the mind or alternative visions of the future. We will not change this simply by increasing state funding of the humanities as opposed to slashing it to nothing. We will change it by insisting that a critical reflection on human values and principles should be central to everything that goes on in universities, not just to the study of Rembrandt or Rimbaud.”
Terry Eagleton

John Berger
“Whenever the intensity of looking reaches a certain degree, one becomes aware of an equally intense energy coming towards one through the appearance of whatever it is one is scrutinizing.”
John Berger

عبد العزيز جاويش
“إن القرآن لم يذر وسيلة موصلة إلى إنعاش العقل وتحرير الفكر إلا وتذرع بها، فهو إذا تحاكم فإلى العقل، وإذا حاج فبحكم العقل، وإذا سخط فعلى معطلي العقل، وإذا رضي فعن أولي العقل”
عبد العزيز جاويش, أثر القرآن في تحرير الفكر البشري

Terry Eagleton
“The humanities should constitute the core of any university worth the name.”
Terry Eagleton

Allan Bloom
“The humanities are like the great old Paris Flea Market where, amidst masses of junk, people with a good eye found cast away treasures...They are like a refugee camp where all the geniuses driven out of their jobs and countries by unfriendly regimes are idling.”
Allan Bloom, The Closing of the American Mind

“Anthropology is the most humanistic of the sciences and the most scientific of the humanities." - Alfred L. Kroeber”
Alfred Louis Kroeber

“In trying to justify the humanities, as in trying to live a life, what may turn out to matter most is holding one's nerve.”
Stefan Collini

“A different voice may be particularly effective in disturbing the existing participants into re-examining matters they had come to take for granted.”
Stefan Collini

Mark Slouka
“The case for the humanities is not hard to make, though it can be difficult--to such an extent have we been marginalized, so long have we acceded to that marginalization--not to sound either defensive or naive. The humanities, done right, are the crucible in which our evolving notions of what it means to be fully human are put to the test; they teach us, incrementally, endlessly, not what to do, but how to be. Their method is confrontational, their domain unlimited, their "product" not truth but the reasoned search for truth, their "success" something very much like Frost's momentary stay against confusion.”
Mark Slouka, Essays from the Nick of Time: Reflections and Refutations

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Art is in the eye of the beholder, and everyone will have their own interpretation.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Brushstrokes of a Gadfly

“Good work, like good talk or any other form of worthwhile human relationship, depends upon being able to assume an extended shared world.”
Stefan Collini

Terry Eagleton
“Might not too much investment in teaching Shelley mean falling behind our economic competitors? But there is no university without humane inquiry, which means that universities and advanced capitalism are fundamentally incompatible. And the political implications of that run far deeper than the question of student fees.”
Terry Eagleton

“Depth of understanding involves something which is more than merely a matter of deconstructive alertness; it involves a measure of interpretative charity and at least the beginnings of a wide responsiveness.”
Stefan Collini

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Let's always try to paint the truth ... our art must be made to mean something.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Brushstrokes of a Gadfly

“The fate of the humanities faculty in the burgeoning world of for-profit higher education is easy to predict, but painful to contemplate. Universities that, by virtue of their very mission, validate economic efficiency and productivity above all else also sanction apathy toward the humanities. (p. 97)”
Frank Donoghue, The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities

Lee Siegel
“Literary art's sudden, startling truth and beauty make us feel, in the most solitary part of us, that we are not alone, and that there are meanings that cannot be bought, sold or traded, that do not decay and die. This socially and economically worthless experience is called transcendence, and you cannot assign a paper, or a grade, or an academic rank, on that. Literature is too sacred to be taught. It needs only to be read.”
Lee Siegel

Terry Eagleton
“When they first emerged in their present shape around the turn of the 18th century, the so-called humane disciplines had a crucial social role. It was to foster and protect the kind of values for which a philistine social order had precious little time. The modern humanities and industrial capitalism were more or less twinned at birth. To preserve a set of values and ideas under siege, you needed among other things institutions known as universities set somewhat apart from everyday social life. This remoteness meant that humane study could be lamentably ineffectual. But it also allowed the humanities to launch a critique of conventional wisdom.”
Terry Eagleton

Ayn Rand
“The position of an art in the scale of human knowledge is, perhaps, the most eloquent symptom of the gulf between man's progress in the physical sciences and his stagnation (or, today, his retrogression) in the humanities.”
Ayn Rand, The Romantic Manifesto

Horace
“Captive Greece captured her rude conqueror”
Horace

Erwin Panofsky
“But what is the use of the humanities as such? Admittedly they are not practical, and admittedly they concern themselves with the past. Why, it may be asked, should we engage in impractical investigations, and why should we be interested in the past?

The answer to the first question is: because we are interested in reality. Both the humanities and the natural sciences, as well as mathematics and philosophy, have the impractical outlook of what the ancients called vita contemplativa as opposed to vita activa. But is the contemplative life less real or, to be more precise, is its contribution to what we call reality less important, than that of the active life?

The man who takes a paper dollar in exchange for twenty-five apples commits an act of faith, and subjects himself to a theoretical doctrine, as did the mediaeval man who paid for indulgence. The man who is run over by an automobile is run over by mathematics, physics and chemistry. For he who leads the contemplative life cannot help influencing the active, just as he cannot prevent the active life from influencing his thought. Philosophical and psychological theories, historical doctrines and all sorts of speculations and discoveries, have changed, and keep changing, the lives of countless millions. Even he who merely transmits knowledge or learning participates, in his modest way, in the process of shaping reality - of which fact the enemies of humanism are perhaps more keenly aware than its friends. It is impossible to conceive of our world in terms of action alone. Only in God is there a "Coincidence of Act and Thought" as the scholastics put it. Our reality can only be understood as an interpenetration of these two.”
Erwin Panofsky, Meaning in the Visual Arts

Carl Alves
“I have seen many atrocities, but they are outweighed by the kind deeds that may seem small, but when added together, create a strong human spirit. Perhaps you would benefit from living a simple life away from war and politics.”
Carl Alves, Two For Eternity

Harold Bloom
“There's very little authentic study of the humanities remaining. My research assistant came to me two years ago saying she'd been in a seminar in which the teacher spent two hours saying that Walt Whitman was a racist. This isn't even good nonsense. It's insufferable.”
Harold Bloom

“In grammar, as in war, there is strength in numbers.”
Martin Worthington, Principles of Akkadian Textual Criticism

Vikram Paralkar
“Todos creemos que la iluminación nos dará placer. Pero ninguno se atreve a mirar directamente el sol del mediodía.”
Vikram Paralkar, Las aflicciones

Leon Wieseltier
“[T]he strongest defense of the humanities lies not in the appeal to their utility — that literature majors may find good jobs, that theaters may economically revitalize neighborhoods — but rather in the appeal to their defiantly nonutilitarian character, so that individuals can know more than how things work, and develop their powers of discernment and judgment, their competence in matters of truth and goodness and beauty, to equip themselves adequately for the choices and the crucibles of private and public life.”
Leon Wieseltier

“To say that the humanities can be a path to truth itself is to challenge one of our most closely held beliefs. We live not only in a scientific world, but also in a scientistic one: a world that thinks that science - empirical, objective, quantifiable - is the exclusive form of knowledge, and that other methods of inquiry are valid only insofar as they approximate its methods. But the humanities and science face in opposite directions. They don't just work in different ways; they work on different things.”
William Deresiewicz, Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life

Samir Okasha
“It must be admitted that scientists today take little interest in philosophy of science.... It is not an indication that philosophical issues are no longer relevant. Rather, it is a consequence of the increasingly specialized nature of science, and of the polarization between the sciences and humanities that characterizes the modern education system.”
Samir Okasha

Andrew Louth
“The method of science is logical and rational; the method of the humanities is one of imagination, sympathetic understanding, ‘indwelling.”
Andrew Louth, Discerning the Mystery: An Essay on the Nature of Theology

“There is a Revolution, it’s a human and technological revolution”
Natasha Tsakos

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