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Quotes About Hotels

Quotes tagged as "hotels" (showing 1-14 of 14)
Groucho Marx
“Room service? Send up a larger room."

[A Night at the Opera]”
Groucho Marx

Paul Quarrington
“The man behind the check-in counter gives the impression that he has just axe-murdered the motel's owner (and family, and family pet) and is going through these procedures of hostelry so as not to arouse suspicion.”
Paul Quarrington, The Ravine

David Sedaris
“The landscape is best described as 'pedestrian hostile.' It's pointless to try to take a walk, so I generally just stay in the room and think about shooting myself in the head.”
David Sedaris, When You Are Engulfed in Flames

Christopher Moore
“It was an eight-harlot inn, if that's how you measure an inn. (I understand that now they measure inns in stars. We are in a four-star inn right now. I don't know what the conversion from harlots to stars is.)”
Christopher Moore, Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal

Stephen King
“Any big hotels have got scandals," he said. "Just like every big hotel has got a ghost. Why? Hell, people come and go. Sometimes one of em will pop off in his room, heart attack or stroke or something like that. Hotels are superstitious places. No thirteenth floor or room thirteen, no mirrors on the back of the door you come in through, stuff like that. [...]”
Stephen King, The Shining

Eugene O'Neill
“He thinks money spent on a home is money wasted. He's lived too much in hotels. Never the best hotels, of course. Second-rate hotels. He doesn't understand a home. He doesn't feel at home in it. And yet, he wants a home. He's even proud of having this shabby place. He loves it here.”
Eugene O'Neill, Long Day's Journey Into Night

أنيس منصور
“الفنادق كالمستشفيات تدفع فيها ألوف الجنيهات و مع ذلك يسمونك ضيفا !”
أنيس منصور, زى الفل أو أحزان هذا الكاتب

Patrick White
“Superficially my war was a comfortable exercise in futility carried out in a grand Scottish hotel amongst the bridge players and swillers of easy-come-by whisky. My chest got me out of active service and into guilt, as I wrote two, or is it three of the novels for which I am now acclaimed.”
Patrick White, Three Uneasy Pieces

Kimberly Karalius
“When her mother combed Harriet's hair, she said that the woods were disgustingly muddy and mosquito-ridden. During her history unit on pioneers, her father bashfully admitted that he couldn't pitch a tent, barbeque, or fight off bears in a forest. They both agreed that such a place was unsafe. Hotels were better.”
Kimberly Karalius, Pocket Forest

Nelson Algren
“So he bought tickets to the Greyhound and they climbed, painfully, inch by inch and with the knowledge that, once they reached the top, there would be one breath-taking moment when the car would tip precariously into space, over an incline six stories steep and then plunge, like a plunging plane. She buried her head against him, fearing to look at the park spread below. He forced himself to look: thousands of little people and hundreds of bright little stands, and over it all the coal-smoke pall of the river factories and railroad yards. He saw in that moment the whole dim-lit city on the last night of summer; the troubled streets that led to the abandoned beaches, the for-rent signs above overnight hotels and furnished basement rooms, moving trolleys and rising bridges: the cagework city, beneath a coalsmoke sky.”
Nelson Algren, Never Come Morning

Chelsea Handler
“A hotel room all to myself is my idea of a good time.”
Chelsea Handler, My Horizontal Life: A Collection of One-Night Stands

Claudio Magris
“There are many hostelries in his report, which is the true account of an expedition.”
Claudio Magris, Danube: A Sentimental Journey from the Source to the Black Sea

Christopher Hitchens
“North Korea is a famine state. In the fields, you can see people picking up loose grains of rice and kernels of corn, gleaning every scrap. They look pinched and exhausted. In the few, dingy restaurants in the city, and even in the few modern hotels, you can read the Pyongyang Times through the soup, or the tea, or the coffee. Morsels of inexplicable fat or gristle are served as 'duck.' One evening I gave in and tried a bowl of dog stew, which at least tasted hearty and spicy—they wouldn't tell me the breed—but then found my appetite crucially diminished by the realization that I hadn't seen a domestic animal, not even the merest cat, in the whole time I was there.”
Christopher Hitchens, Love, Poverty, and War: Journeys and Essays

Virginia Woolf
“These hotels are not consoling places. Far from it. Any number of people had hung up their hats on those pegs. Even the flies, if you thought of it, had settled on other people’s noses. As for the cleanliness which hit him in the face, it wasn’t cleanliness, so much as bareness, frigidity; a thing that had to be.”
Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

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