Quotes About Hospice

Quotes tagged as "hospice" (showing 1-16 of 16)
Shannon L. Alder
“Top 10 Deathbed Regrets:

1. I wish I'd had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life other people expected of me.

2. I wish I took time to be with my children more when they were growing up.

3. I wish I had the courage to express my feelings, without the fear of being rejected or unpopular.

4. I wish I would have stayed in touch with friends and family.

5. I wish I would have forgiven someone when I had the chance.

6. I wish I would have told the people I loved the most how important they are to me.

7. I wish I would have had more confidence and tried more things, instead of being afraid of looking like a fool.

8. I wish I would have done more to make an impact in this world.

9. I wish I would have experienced more, instead of settling for a boring life filled with routine, mediocrity and apathy.

10. I wish I would have pursued my talents and gifts.

(contributed by Shannon L. Alder, author and therapist that has 17 years of experience working with hospice patients)”
Shannon L. Alder

“I wonder if my first breath was as soul-stirring to my mother as her last breath was to me. – From 14 Days: A Mother, A Daughter, A Two-Week Goodbye”
Lisa Goich

Milkweed L. Augustine
“There is absolutely no way someone cannot be affected, or cannnot learn vital lessons by being forced to dwell in the margins of a hindering repose as the one loved by so very few."

Dying and Loving It”
Milkweed L. Augustine

Christine Cowgill
“Death should not be viewed as a medical failure but as a natural conclusion to life.”
Christine Cowgill, Soul Service: A Hospice Guide to the Emotional and Spiritual Care for the Dying

Molly Friedenfeld
“Spending moments with another in earnest presence is one of the simple ways we can show unconditional love. It is the memories created from these impressions that survive after all else passes.”
Molly Friedenfeld

Molly Friedenfeld
“Angels of highest light and love,
Angels that radiate beams of pure energy from the heavens above.

Please join us and be with us on this very night,
As the soul of our beloved joins you in flight.

We pray that you send this soul embraced in your lovely wings,
During his journey may he hear harps, and trumpets and strings.”
Molly Friedenfeld, The Book of Simple Human Truths

“If we listen and observe carefully the dying can teach us important things that we need to learn in preparing for the end of our own life's journey.”
Robert L. Wise, Crossing the Threshold of Eternity: What the Dying Can Teach the Living

Thomas Hager
“Where there were once several competing approaches to medicine, there is now only one that matters to most hospitals, insurers, and the vast majority of the public. One that has been shaped to a great degree by the successful development of potent cures that followed the discovery of sulfa drugs. Aspiring caregivers today are chosen as much (or more) for their scientific abilities, their talent for mastering these manifold technological and pharmaceutical advances as for their interpersonal skills. A century ago most physicians were careful, conservative observers who provided comfort to patients and their families. Today they act: They prescribe, they treat, they cure. They routinely perform what were once considered miracles. The result, in the view of some, has been a shift in the profession from caregiver to technician. The powerful new drugs changed how care was given as well as who gave it.”
Thomas Hager, The Demon Under the Microscope: From Battlefield Hospitals to Nazi Labs, One Doctor's Heroic Search for the World's First Miracle Drug

“There is one essential requirement for being close with a dying person: the letting go of self-concern.”
Robert Martensen, A Life Worth Living: A Doctor's Reflections on Illness in a High-Tech Era

“.....listening means learning to hear someone's inner world and deepest feelings with far greater attention in order that we don't let our own assumptions get in the way. The dying may speak in images far more akin to dreamland than the world of everyday reality. In order to understand them we have to make adjustments to comprehend a poetic form of expression that is sometimes elusive but actually far more expressive than the world of facts.”
Robert L. Wise, Crossing the Threshold of Eternity: What the Dying Can Teach the Living

Lisa Goich-Andreadis
“I wonder if my first breath was as soul-stirring to my mother as her last breath was to me. – From 14 Days: A Mother, A Daughter, A Two-Week Goodbye”
Lisa Goich-Andreadis, 14 Days: A Mother, A Daughter, A Two Week Goodbye

Cheryl Strayed
“The bullet hit Lady right between her eyes, in the middle of her white star, exactly where we hoped it would. She bolted so hard her leather halter snapped into pieces and fell away from her face, and then she stood unmoving, looking at us with a stunned expression.

"Shoot her again," I gasped, and immediately Leif did, firing three more bullets into her head in quick succession. She stumbled and jerked, but she didn't fall and she didn't run, though she was no longer tied to the tree. Her eyes were wild upon us, shocked by what we'd done, her face a constellation of bloodless holes. In an instant I knew we'd done the wrong thing, not in killing her, but in thinking that we should be the ones to do it. I should have insisted Eddie do this one thing, or paid for the veterinarian to come out. I'd had the wrong idea of what it takes to kill an animal. There is no such thing as one clean shot.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

Molly Friedenfeld
“The kindness sent from one compassionate soul to another during the time of loss of one held so dear allows the sorrow-filled heart to open wide, filling the space of emptiness that grief may have created with a renewed sense of peace, compassion, and love.”
Molly Friedenfeld, The Book of Simple Human Truths

Mark Doty
“I’d write and read and let myself, a little at a time, step down into myself- like a stairway down into a dark, intimate kiva- where the work of vigil is taking place, the necessary attending. I imagine there’s a little fire burning in there, a few steadily glowing embers, and a quiet chant going on, from me, from some singer in me, honoring and accompanying W’s soul, which is with him as he is making his passage. ..there’s a leavetaking in process, a movement towards increasing simplicity, away from complexity, activity, expectation. The bout of paranoia, with a childlike quality of being threatened, seems part of that-like a day or two when he couldn’t just let go and float on the energies of other people, who are bearing him up-but had to doubt them, struggle. So much better when he can trust and float. There’s enough love around him to carry him now…”
Mark Doty, Heaven's Coast: A Memoir

Joe Niemczura
“Every woman deserves the simple dignity of dying in a bed with clean sheets and an electric light at hand.'

-spoken by Sara, the missionary doctor, during a moment of indignation.”
Joe Niemczura, The Sacrament of the Goddess

Joe Niemczura
“To transport this way along bouncy mountain roads is not the way to die. Every woman deserves the simple dignity of dying in a bed with clean sheets and an electric light at hand. They wanted me to participate in a horrible abomination. I simply will not countenance the lack of respect for the poor mother of those boys. Imagine how she would feel if she woke up and saw her sons piled at her side."
-spoken by Sara to Matt regarding a victim of Amanita Phalloides [poisoning”
Joe Niemczura, The Sacrament of the Goddess

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