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Quotes About Horses

Quotes tagged as "horses" (showing 1-30 of 183)
Adlai E. Stevenson II
“It's hard to lead a cavalry charge if you think you look funny on a horse.”
Adlai E. Stevenson II

Maggie Stiefvater
“It is the first day of November and so, today, someone will die.”
Maggie Stiefvater, The Scorpio Races

Rick Riordan
“Please, Percy...change your clothes. You smell like you've been run over by an electric horse.”
Rick Riordan, The Mark of Athena

The last time somebody pointed out that cowboys ride horses, not tricycles, I shot him.
“The last time somebody pointed out that cowboys ride horses, not tricycles, I shot him. Of course, I waited until another gunslinger gunned him down, but nevertheless, I still shot him.”
Jarod Kintz, Who Moved My Choose?: An Amazing Way to Deal With Change by Deciding to Let Indecision Into Your Life

Maggie Stiefvater
“Sean reaches between us and slides a thin bracelet of red ribbons over my free hand. Lifting my arm, he presses his lips against the inside of my wrist. I'm utterly still; I feel my pulse tap several times against his lips, and then he releases my hand.
"For luck," he says. He takes Dove's lead from me.
"Sean," I say, and he turns. I take his chin and kiss his lips, hard. I'm reminded, all of a sudden, of that first day on the beach, when I pulled his head from the water.
"For luck," I say to his startled face.”
Maggie Stiefvater, The Scorpio Races

“In riding a horse, we borrow freedom”
Helen Thompson

Karen Kingsbury
“Three years? That's a thousand tomorrows, ma'am.”
Karen Kingsbury

W.C. Fields
“Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people. ”
W.C. Fields

Terry Pratchett
“There is a lot of folklore about equestrian statues, especially the ones with riders on them. There is said to be a code in the number and placement of the horse's hooves: If one of the horse's hooves is in the air, the rider was wounded in battle; two legs in the air means that the rider was killed in battle; three legs in the air indicates that the rider got lost on the way to the battle; and four legs in the air means that the sculptor was very, very clever. Five legs in the air means that there's probably at least one other horse standing behind the horse you're looking at; and the rider lying on the ground with his horse lying on top of him with all four legs in the air means that the rider was either a very incompetent horseman or owned a very bad-tempered horse.”
Terry Pratchett, I Shall Wear Midnight (Discworld, #38)

Alice Walker
“Horses make a landscape look beautiful.”
Alice Walker

Jarod Kintz
“We rode the merry-go-round like a couple of lovers. We weren’t though; we were just two horse enthusiasts from two different worlds (I think she was from Mars).”
Jarod Kintz, The Titanic would never have sunk if it were made out of a sink.

William Shakespeare
“When I bestride him, I soar, I am a hawk: he trots the air; the earth sings when he touches it; the basest horn of his hoof is more musical than the pipe of Hermes. ”
William Shakespeare, Henry V

Anna Sewell
“My troubles are all over, and I am at home; and often before I am quite awake, I fancy I am still in the orchard at Birtwick, standing with my friends under the apple trees.”
Anna Sewell, Black Beauty [With Gold-Toned Horse Charm Necklace]

Diana Wynne Jones
“Horses are of a breed unique to Fantasyland. They are capable of galloping full-tilt all day without a rest. Sometimes they do not require food or water. They never cast shoes, go lame or put their hooves down holes, except when the Management deems it necessary, as when the forces of the Dark Lord are only half an hour behind. They never otherwise stumble. Nor do they ever make life difficult for Tourists by biting or kicking their riders or one another. They never resist being mounted or blow out so that their girths slip, or do any of the other things that make horses so chancy in this world. For instance, they never shy and seldom whinny or demand sugar at inopportune moments. But for some reason you cannot hold a conversation while riding them. If you want to say anything to another Tourist (or vice versa), both of you will have to rein to a stop and stand staring out over a valley while you talk. Apart from this inexplicable quirk, horses can be used just like bicycles, and usually are. Much research into how these exemplary animals come to exist has resulted in the following: no mare ever comes into season on the Tour and no stallion ever shows an interest in a mare; and few horses are described as geldings. It therefore seems probable that they breed by pollination. This theory seems to account for everything, since it is clear that the creatures do behave more like vegetables than mammals. Nomads appears to have a monopoly on horse-breeding. They alone possess the secret of how to pollinate them.”
Diana Wynne Jones, The Tough Guide to Fantasyland

“When I hear somebody talk about a horse or cow being stupid; I figure it's a sure sign that the animal has somehow outfoxed them”
Tom Dorrance, True Unity: Willing Communication Between Horse & Human

Jennifer Echols
“You’ve gone far away to a place with no horses and very little grass, and you’re studying how to write a story with a happy ending. If you can write that ending for yourself, maybe you can come back.”
Jennifer Echols, Love Story

P.G. Wodehouse
“Employers are like horses — they require management.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Carry on, Jeeves

“You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him participate in synchronized diving.”
Cuthbert Soup, Another Whole Nother Story

Jane Smiley
“But what truly horsey girls discover in the end is that boyfriends, husbands, children, and careers are the substitute-for horses”
Jane Smiley, A Year at the Races: Reflections on Horses, Humans, Love, Money, and Luck

Enid Bagnold
“I don't like people," said Velvet. "... I only like horses.”
Enid Bagnold, National Velvet

William Shakespeare
“He's of the colour of the nutmeg. And of the heat of the ginger.... he is pure air and fire; and the dull elements of earth and water never appear in him, but only in patient stillness while his rider mounts him; he is indeed a horse, and all other jades you may call beasts.”
William Shakespeare, Henry V

“A horse loves freedom, and the weariest old work horse will roll on the ground or break into a lumbering gallop when he is turned loose into the open.”
Gerald Raftery

“Do you give the horse his strength or clothe his neck with a flowing mane? Do you make him leap like a locust, striking terror with his proud snorting? He paws fiercely, rejoicing in his strength, and charges into the fray. He laughs at fear, afraid of nothing; he does not shy away from the sword. The quiver rattles against his side, along with the flashing spear and lance. In frenzied excitement he eats up the ground; he cannot stand still when the trumpet sounds."
Job 39:19-25”
Anonymous, Holy Bible: New International Version

“A horse which stops dead just before a jump and thus propels its rider into a graceful arc provides a splendid excuse for general merriment.”
H.R.H. Prince Philip

Tessa Dare
“Proper handling of a horse like this is no simple matter. He was trained to race, from birth. Not only to race, but to be the best. Once a champion, he was spoiled with attention and permissive handling. Add to that, he's an ungelded male, with a strong natural mating drive. It all adds up to a horse with a mile-wide streak of arrogance, bloody bored out of his mind. Without proper exercise and opportunities to mate, all that aggressive energy festers. He becomes moody, intractable, withdrawn, destructive."

Ashworth raised an eyebrow at Bellamy. "Is it just me, or is this conversation becoming uncomfortably personal?"

Spencer fumed. "I'm not referring to myself, you ass.”
Tessa Dare, One Dance with a Duke

Lisi Harrison
“When the horse was little, Massie had covered the walls with posters of young fillies that she thought Brownie would find sexy.”
Lisi Harrison, Revenge of the Wannabes

Rae Carson
“Until recently, I believed all horses were alike. They’ve been giant, four-footed animals with ugly dispositions and alarmingly large teeth for so long that it’s a bit startling to notice how different they are from each other. Mara’s mare, for instance, is a chestnut bay except for a wide white blaze down her nose that makes her seem perpetually surprised. My huge plodding mount is a dark brown near to blackcreature, with the most unruly mane I’ve ever seen. Her shaggy forelock covers her right eye and reaches almost to her mouth.
Mara’s mare head-butts her in the chest. Grinning, Mara plants a kiss between her wide, dumb eyes, then murmurs something.
“Have you named her?” I ask.
“Yes! Her name is Jasmine.”
I grimace. “But jasmine is such a sweet, pretty flower.”
Mara laughs. “Have you named yours?”
“Her name is Horse.”
She rolls her eyes. “If you want to get along with your mount you have to learn each others’ languages. That means starting with a good name.”
“All right.” I pretend to consider. “What about Imbecile? Or Poops A Lot?”
Rae Carson, The Bitter Kingdom

Jane Smiley
“Fascination with horses predated every other single thing I knew. Before I was a mother, before I was a writer, before I knew the facts of life, before I was a schoolgirl, before I learned to read, I wanted a horse.”
Jane Smiley, A Year at the Races: Reflections on Horses, Humans, Love, Money, and Luck

Ami Blackwelder
“Her caramel skin and curly beach sand hair spreads in wavy chops like the choppy storm waves on the ocean. Her fluffy rose colored lips glisten with eyes emerald green and almond shaped set deep into her face and yet when she looks at you with those same deep set eyes, it feels like they jump out, speaking to you.”
Ami Blackwelder

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