Quotes About Heroines

Quotes tagged as "heroines" (showing 1-18 of 18)
Christopher Hitchens
Who are your favorite heroines in real life? The women of Afghanistan, Iraq, and Iran who risk their lives and their beauty to defy the foulness of theocracy. Ayaan Hirsi Ali and Azar Nafisi as their ideal feminine model.”
Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22: A Memoir

Catherynne M. Valente
“We like the wrong sorts of girls, they wrote. They are usually the ones worth writing about.”
Catherynne M. Valente, In the Cities of Coin and Spice

Sarah Wendell
“To quote French author Francois Mauriac, 'Tell me what you read and I'll tell you who your are' is true enough, but I'd know you better if you told me what you reread.”
Sarah Wendell, Everything I Know About Love I Learned from Romance Novels

Leigh Bardugo
“I think we often hold heroines to an absurd standard. Be brave! Be wise! Always know what's in your heart and speak the truth of it! No and no and no. We fight to be brave. We learn to be wise. We struggle to know ourselves and voice what we want.”
Leigh Bardugo

Nenia Campbell
“She seemed like the kind of woman who would fall in love with the sky.”
Nenia Campbell, Cease and Desist

Roman Payne
“The day came when she discovered sex, sensuality, and literature; she said, 'I submit! Let my life be henceforth ruled by poetry. Let me reign as the queen of my dreams until I become nothing less than the heroine of God.”
Roman Payne

Louisa May Alcott
“…I wanted to show that the mother was the heroine as soon as possible. I'm tired of love-sick girls and runaway wives. We'll prove that there's romance in old women also.”
Louisa May Alcott, Jo's Boys

William Kamkwamba
“Dr. Mary Atwater's story was so inspiring. Growing up, Dr. Atwater had a dream to one day be a teacher. But as a black person in the American South during the 1950s, she didn't have many great educational opportunities. It didn't help that she was also a girl, and a girl who loved science, since many believed that science was a subject only for men. Well, like me, she didn't listen to what others said. And also like me, Dr. Atwater had a father, Mr. John C. Monroe, who believed in her dreams and saved money to send her and her siblings to college. She eventually got a PhD in science education with a concentration in chemistry. She was an associate director at New Mexico State University and then taught physical science and chemistry at Fayetteville State University. She later joined the University of Georgia, where she still works as a science education researcher. Along the way, she began writing science books, never knowing that, many years down the road, one of those books would end up in Wimbe, Malawi, and change my life forever.

I'd informed Dr. Atwater that the copy of Using Energy I'd borrowed so many times had been stolen (probably by another student hoping to get the same magic), so that day in Washington, she presented me with my own copy, along with the teacher's edition and a special notebook to record my experiments.

"Your story confirms my belief in human beings and their abilities to make the world a better place by using science," she told me. "I'm happy that I lived long enough to see that something I wrote could change someone's life. I'm glad I found you."

And for sure, I'm also happy to have found Dr. Atwater.”
William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope

J.M.  Richards
“He pinned me in place with a direct look, his dark brown eyes smoldering. “You’re Mary Jane,” he said finally. “And you have all these Flash Thompsons and Harry Osborns hovering around you, trying to make a move. Because...you’re basically amazing.”
J.M. Richards, Tall, Dark Streak of Lightning

Samantha Ellis
“After three years of English at Cambridge, being force-fed literary theory, I was almost convinced that literature was all coded messages about Marxism and the death of the self. I crawled out of the post-structuralist desert thirsty for heroines I could cry and laugh with. I was jaded. I craved trash.”
Samantha Ellis, How To Be a Heroine

Lola Dodge
“My body shook from pain, exhaustion, and the beginning of shock. I'd pay for all the powers I'd used, but the portal most of all. Good girls weren't supposed to open hell dimensions.”
Lola Dodge, Temptress

Betsy Cornwell
“I had rescued myself entirely.”
Betsy Cornwell, Mechanica

Bangambiki Habyarimana
“We are all heroes of our little worlds”
Bangambiki Habyarimana, The Great Pearl of Wisdom

T.C. Boyle
“A glad zest and hopefulness might be inspired even in the most jaded and ennui-cursed, were there in our homes such simple, truthful natures as that of my heroine, and it is in the sphere of quiet homes—not elsewhere—I believe that a woman can best rule and save the world.”
T.C. Boyle, San Miguel

Samantha Ellis
“-maybe we read heroines for what we need from them at the time.”
Samantha Ellis, How To Be a Heroine

Werner A. Lind
“The intensity of her pleasure at this compliment surprised her, and she dropped her eyes. "I but wear the only dress I own, and I misdoubt whether mine hair be well-combed even now.”
Werner A. Lind

Samantha Ellis
“I love the fact that Perrault's princess goes on living and struggling after she finds her prince, and that Perrault doesn't shrink from the weirdness of Sleeping Beauty being over a hundred years old but having the body of a lithe young thing. When the prince wakes her, he considers telling her she's wearing the kind of clothes his grandmother used to wear, but decides it's best not to mention it just yet.”
Samantha Ellis, How To Be a Heroine

Samantha Ellis
“At this point, harking back to the stuff about souls, Andersen bolts on a perplexing Christian salvation message about how the Little Mermaid can earn a soul if she is good for three hundred years, but every time she sees 'a rude, naughty child', she'll get more time in purgatory. Don't be rude or naughty or the mermaids will suffer? Please. Even as a child, I knew this was ridiculous.”
Samantha Ellis, How To Be a Heroine

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