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Quotes About Great Expectations

Quotes tagged as "great-expectations" (showing 1-29 of 29)
Charles Dickens
“So, throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape.”
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
“We changed again, and yet again, and it was now too late and too far to go back, and I went on. And the mists had all solemnly risen now, and the world lay spread before me.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Lauren Morrill
“All I want, oh dear friend of mine, is for you to go out with someone. Do something, even if it's not the magical, wonderful thing you had in mind. Don't sit around for one more second pining away for some fantasy that might never come along, because it might not even exist.”
Lauren Morrill, Meant to Be

Charles Dickens
“Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“So new to him," she muttered, "so old to me; so strange to him, so familiar to me; so melancholy to both of us!...”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“The secret was such an old one now, had so grown into me and become a part of myself, that I could not tear it away.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“Dios sabe que nunca hemos de avergonzarnos de nuestras lágrimas, porque son la lluvia que limpia el cegador polvo de la tierra que recubre nuestros corazones endurecidos.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“She had curiously thoughtful and attentive eyes; eyes that were very pretty and very good.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlaying our hard hearts.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

V.C. Andrews
“Cathy, don't look so defeated. She was only trying to put us down
again.
Maybe nothing did work out right for her, but that doesn't mean we are
doomed. Let's go forth tomorrow with no great expectations of finding
perfection. Then, expecting only a small share of happiness, we won't
be disappointed."
If a little hill of happiness would satisfy Chris, good for him. But
after all these years of striving, hoping, dreaming, longing-I wanted a
mountain high! A hill wasn't enough. From this day forward, I vowed
to myself, I was in control of my life. Not fate, not
God, not even Chris was ever again going to tell me what to do, or
dominate me in any way. From this day forward, I was my own person, to
take what I would, when I would, and I would answer only to myself. I'd
been kept prisoner, held captive by greed. I'd been betrayed,
deceived, tied to, used, poisoned ... but all that was over now.”
V.C. Andrews, Flowers in the Attic

Charles Dickens
“Moths, and all sorts of ugly creatures," replied Estella, with a glance towards him, "hover about a lighted candle. Can the candle help it?”
Charles Dickens

Eileen Granfors
“pencils racing across paper, a sound I like." Marisol”
Eileen Granfors, Some Rivers End on the Day of the Dead

Charles Dickens
“Mrs. Pocket was at home, and was in a little difficulty, on account of the baby's having been accommodated with a needle case to keep him quiet during the unaccountable absence (with a relative in the Foot Guards) of Millers. And more needles were missing than it could be regarded as quite wholesome for a patient of such tender years either to apply externally or to take as a tonic.”
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
“Brag is good dog, holdfast is better!”
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
“She stood looking at me, and, of course, I stood looking at her.
"Am I pretty?"
"Yes; I think you are very pretty."
"Am I insulting?"
"Not so much so as you were last time," said I.
"Not so much so?"
"No."
She fired when she asked the last question, and she slapped my face with such force as she had, when I answered it.
"Now," said she. "You little course monster, what do you think of me now?"
"I shall not tell you."
"Because you are going to tell upstairs. Is that it?"
"No," said I. "That is not it."
"Why don't you cry again, you little wretch?"
"Because I'll never cry for you again," said I.”
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
“On the Rampage, Pip, and off the Rampage, Pip - such is Life!”
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
“I should not have minded that, if they would only have left me alone. But they wouldn't leave me alone. They seemed to think the opportunity lost, if they failed to point the conversation at me, every now and then, and stick the point into me.”
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
“A man would die tonight of lying out on the marshes, I thought. And then I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pitty in all the glittering multitude.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“Pip, dear old chap, life is made of ever so many partings welded together, as I may say, and one man’s a blacksmith, and one’s a whitesmith, and one’s a goldsmith, and one’s a coppersmith. Diwisions among such must come, and must be met as they come. If there’s been any fault at all to-day, it’s mine. You and me is not two figures to be together in London; nor yet anywheres else but what is private, and beknown, and understood among friends. It ain’t that I am proud, but that I want to be right, as you shall never see me no more in these clothes. I’m wrong in these clothes. I’m wrong out of the forge, the kitchen, or off th’ meshes. You won’t find half so much fault in me if you think me in forge dress, with my hammer in my hand, or even my pipe. You won’t find half so much fault in me if, supposing as you should ever wish to see me, you come and put your head in at the forge window and see Joe the blacksmith, there, at the old anvil, in the old burnt apron, sticking to the old work. I’m aweful dull, but I hope I’ve beat out something nigh the rights of this at last. And so God bless you, dear old Pip, old chap, God bless you!”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

“If you expect to reach the goal of perfection, never look at the cup as being half empty, see it as being half full.”
Barbara Hart

Charles Dickens
“Here my sister, after a fit of clappings and screamings, beat her hands upon her bosom and upon her knees, and threw her cap off, and pulled her hair down - which were the last stages on her road to frenzy. Being by this time a perfect fury and a complete success, she made a dash to the door”
Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens
“I wanted to make Joe less ignorant and common, that he might be worthier of my society and less open to Estella's reproach.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“Yet he would smoke his pipe at the Battery with a far more sagacious air then anywhere else - even with a learned air - as if he considered himself to be advancing immensely. Dear fellow, I hope he did.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“...sapevo, con mio grande dolore, molto spesso, se non sempre, che l'amavo a dispetto della ragione, a dispetto di ogni promessa, a dispetto della mia pace, a dispetto della speranza, a dispetto della felicità, a dispetto di ogni possibile scoraggiamento. Una volta per tutte: non l'amavo di meno perché lo sapevo, e il fatto che lo sapessi non valeva a frenarmi...”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“He was a prosperous old bachelor, and his open window looked into a prosperous little garden and orchard, and there was a prosperous iron safe let into the wall at the side of his fireplace, and I did not doubt that heaps of his prosperity were put away in it in bags.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“Bear in mind then, that Brag is a good dog, but Holdfast is a better.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
“The contention came, after all, to this - the secret was such an old one now, had so grown into me and become a part of myself, that I could not tear it away.”
Charles Dickens

Rainbow Rowell
“Hello smart girl. Would you like to talk to me about Great Expectations?”
Rainbow Rowell, Fangirl

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