Quotes About Fugitive

Quotes tagged as "fugitive" (showing 1-12 of 12)
Oscar Wilde
“He wanted to be where no one would know who he was. He wanted to escape from himself.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Michael Bassey Johnson
“A wise man can say a foolish thing at any time, anywhere, and to anybody.”
Michael Bassey Johnson

Deirdre-Elizabeth Parker
“So, this is how it will play out. Today, in the sunshine, on the noisy sidewalk at Logan Airport in Boston, with people and their suitcases bumping into me, and taxi horns blaring and strangers going about their routine day, I’m about to learn that I have lost my husband. I will finally know his secrets.”
Deirdre-Elizabeth Parker, The Fugitive's Doctor

William Faulkner
“From that night the thousand streets ran as one street, with imperceptible corners and changes of scene, broken by intervals of begged and stolen rides, on trains and trucks, and on country wagons with he at twenty and twentyfive and thirty sitting on the seat with his still, hard face and the clothes (even when soiled and worn) of a city man and the driver of the wagon not knowing who or what the passenger was and not daring to ask. The street ran into Oklahoma and Missouri and as far south again as Mexico and then back north to Chicago and Detroit and then back south again and at last to Mississippi. It was fifteen years long.”
William Faulkner, Light in August

Deirdre-Elizabeth Parker
“I have spent my whole life preparing to be William Wallace’s wife. The choices I make are defined by the person I am.
“I am Mrs. William Victor Wallace. I am married to a federal felon whom I love unconditionally.
I hold my head high, I take pride in my life and I walk this world without regret.
I will be the perfect wife and my husband deserves nothing less.”
Deirdre-Elizabeth Parker, The Fugitive's Doctor

Marcel Proust
“Every woman feels that the greater her power over a man, the more impossible it is to leave him except by sudden flight: a fugitive precisely because a queen.”
Marcel Proust, The Captive & The Fugitive

Deirdre-Elizabeth Parker
“The next morning he drove the stranger’s car half way to the Registry of Motor Vehicles before he realized he could not apply for a driver’s license. He suddenly realized he had left his name at the prison.”
Deirdre-Elizabeth Parker, The Fugitive's Doctor

Ursula K. Le Guin
“They did not use the sonic stunners but the foray gun, the ancient weapon that fires a set of metal fragments in a burst. They shot to kill him. He was dying when I got to him, sprawled and twisted away from his skis that stuck up out of the snow, his chest half shot away. I took his head in my arms and spoke to him, but he never answered me; only in a way he answered my love for him, crying out through the silent wreck and tumult of his mind as consciousness lapsed, in the unspoken tongue, once, clearly, 'Arek!' Then no more. I held him, crouching there in the snow, while he died. They let me do that. Then they made me get up, and took me off one way and him another, I going to prison and he into the dark.”
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness

Deirdre-Elizabeth Parker
“I am flagrantly nuts. I can say this because I am a doctor and I know about these things.”
Deirdre-Elizabeth Parker, The Fugitive's Doctor

Eric Rudolph
“The profilers’ plan to coax me out of the woods resembled a comedy skit. During their search of my Cane Creek trailer, the feds had found dozens of books on the Civil War. And interviews with my friends confirmed that I was a bona fide Civil War buff. The profilers looked at all this Civil War “stimuli” and concluded that my hiding in the mountains was a form of role-playing. Starring in my own Civil War fantasy, I was a lone rebel fighting for the Lost Cause, and the task force was a Yankee army out to capture me. To talk On August 16, the task force pulled out of the woods while Bo and his rebels went in. They had to look the part, so the FBI profilers dressed them in white hats with the word “REBEL” stenciled in red letters across the front; and around their neck each rebel wore a Confederate flag bandanna.me into surrendering, they needed some of my rebel comrades to convince me that
the war was over and it was time to lay down my arms. Colonel Gritz and his crew were assigned the role of my rebel comrades. They were there to “rescue” me from the Yankee horde.

Bo’s band of rebels pitched camp down in Tusquitee, north of the town of Hayesville. Beginning at Bob Allison Campground – the place where I’d abandoned Nordmann’s truck – they worked their way west into the Tusquitee Mountains. They walked the trails, blowing whistles and yelling “Eric, we’re here with Bo Gritz to save you.” They searched for a week.

I lost it when I heard on the radio that the profilers had dressed Gritz’s clowns in “REBEL” hats and Confederate flag bandannas. I laughed so hard I think I broke a rib.”
Eric Rudolph, Between the Lines of Drift: The Memoirs of a Militant

James Carlos Blake
“The family landed in the Western Hemisphere in the person of Roger Blake Wolfe, who arrived with a price on his head.”
James Carlos Blake, Country of the Bad Wolfes

Felix Wantang
“Rejecting Jesus Christ is like a fugitive who spends all day running but has nowhere to hide; you will face him after death. He is the only judge and jury.”
Felix Wantang, Face to Face Meetings with Jesus Christ Revised Edition: Biblical Mysteries Revealed in His Own Words Like Never Before in Human History.

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