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Quotes About Falstaff

Quotes tagged as "falstaff" (showing 1-9 of 9)
William Shakespeare
“What is honour? a word. What is in that word honour? what is that honour? air. A trim reckoning! Who hath it? he that died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel it? no. Doth he hear it? no.”
William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1

William Shakespeare
“Hal, if I tell thee a lie, spit in my face, call me horse.”
William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1

William Shakespeare
“How now, my sweet creature of bombast! How long is't ago, Jack, since thou saw'st thien own knee?”
William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1

William Shakespeare
“Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us that are squires of the night’s body be called thieves of the day’s beauty. Let us be Diana’s foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon, and let men say we be men of good government, being governed, as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal.”
William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1

W.H. Auden
“If it really was Queen Elizabeth who demanded to see Falstaff in a comedy, then she showed herself a very perceptive critic. But even in The Merry Wives of Windsor, Falstaff has not and could not have found his true home because Shakespeare was only a poet. For that he was to wait nearly two hundred years till Verdi wrote his last opera. Falstaff is not the only case of a character whose true home is the world of music; others are Tristan, Isolde and Don Giovanni.”
W.H. Auden, The Dyer's Hand

William Shakespeare
“O monstrous! eleven buckram men grown out of two!”
William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1

William Shakespeare
“I’ll be no longer guilty of this sin; this sanguine coward, this bed-presser, this horseback-breaker, this huge hill of flesh,—”
William Shakespeare, King Henry IV, Part 1

“Nernst was a great admirer of Shakespeare, and it is said that in a conference concerned with naming units after appropriate persons, he proposed that the unit of rate of liquid flow should be called the falstaff.”
J.R. Partington

“If it were possible for a metaphysician to be a golfer, he might perhaps occasionally notice that his ball, instead of moving forward in a vertical plane (like the generality of projectiles, such as brickbats and cricket balls), skewed away gradually to the right. If he did notice it, his methods would naturally lead him to content himself with his caddies's remark-'ye heeled that yin,' or 'Ye jist sliced it.' ... But a scientific man is not to be put off with such flimsy verbiage as that. He must know more. What is 'Heeling', what is 'slicing', and why would either operation (if it could be thoroughly carried out) send a ball as if to cover point, thence to long slip, and finally behind back-stop? These, as Falstaff said, are 'questions to be asked.”
Peter Guthrie Tait

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