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Quotes About Ends

Quotes tagged as "ends" (showing 1-27 of 27)
C. JoyBell C.
“Ends are not bad things, they just mean that something else is about to begin. And there are many things that don't really end, anyway, they just begin again in a new way. Ends are not bad and many ends aren't really an ending; some things are never-ending.”
C. JoyBell C.

Walter M. Miller Jr.
“To minimize suffering and to maximize security were natural and proper ends of society and Caesar. But then they became the only ends, somehow, and the only basis of law—a perversion. Inevitably, then, in seeking only them, we found only their opposites: maximum suffering and minimum security.”
Walter M. Miller Jr., A Canticle for Leibowitz

Shannon L. Alder
“Your heart’s strength is measured by how hard it holds on. Your self worth and faith is measured by finally letting go. However, your peace is measured by how long you don’t look back.”
Shannon L. Alder

Mahatma Gandhi
“Reader: Will you not admit that you are arguing against yourself? You know that what the English obtained in their own country they obtained by using brute force. I know you have argued that what they have obtained is useless, but that does not affect my argument. They wanted useless things and they got them. My point is that their desire was fulfilled. What does it matter what means they adopted? Why should we not obtain our goal, which is good, by any means whatsoever, even by using violence? Shall I think of the means when I have to deal with a thief in the house? My duty is to drive him out anyhow. You seem to admit that we have received nothing, and that we shall receive nothing by petitioning. Why, then, may we do not so by using brute force? And, to retain what we may receive we shall keep up the fear by using the same force to the extent that it may be necessary. You will not find fault with a continuance of force to prevent a child from thrusting its foot into fire. Somehow or other we have to gain our end.

Editor: Your reasoning is plausible. It has deluded many. I have used similar arguments before now. But I think I know better now, and I shall endeavour to undeceive you. Let us first take the argument that we are justified in gaining our end by using brute force because the English gained theirs by using similar means. It is perfectly true that they used brute force and that it is possible for us to do likewise, but by using similar means we can get only the same thing that they got. You will admit that we do not want that. Your belief that there is no connection between the means and the end is a great mistake. Through that mistake even men who have been considered religious have committed grievous crimes. Your reasoning is the same as saying that we can get a rose through planting a noxious weed. If I want to cross the ocean, I can do so only by means of a vessel; if I were to use a cart for that purpose, both the cart and I would soon find the bottom. "As is the God, so is the votary", is a maxim worth considering. Its meaning has been distorted and men have gone astray. The means may be likened to a seed, the end to a tree; and there is just the same inviolable connection between the means and the end as there is between the seed and the tree. I am not likely to obtain the result flowing from the worship of God by laying myself prostrate before Satan. If, therefore, anyone were to say : "I want to worship God; it does not matter that I do so by means of Satan," it would be set down as ignorant folly. We reap exactly as we sow. The English in 1833 obtained greater voting power by violence. Did they by using brute force better appreciate their duty? They wanted the right of voting, which they obtained by using physical force. But real rights are a result of performance of duty; these rights they have not obtained. We, therefore, have before us in English the force of everybody wanting and insisting on his rights, nobody thinking of his duty. And, where everybody wants rights, who shall give them to whom? I do not wish to imply that they do no duties. They don't perform the duties corresponding to those rights; and as they do not perform that particular duty, namely, acquire fitness, their rights have proved a burden to them. In other words, what they have obtained is an exact result of the means they adapted. They used the means corresponding to the end. If I want to deprive you of your watch, I shall certainly have to fight for it; if I want to buy your watch, I shall have to pay you for it; and if I want a gift, I shall have to plead for it; and, according to the means I employ, the watch is stolen property, my own property, or a donation. Thus we see three different results from three different means. Will you still say that means do not matter?”
Mahatma Gandhi

Shannon L. Alder
“Some people can’t be in your life because they don’t have the power to help you improve it. That doesn’t mean you don’t wish them well, it just means that you are on Chapter 10 of your life, when they are on Chapter 5. Maybe, it is just enough to meet at the crossroads in life and agree to take separate paths, then with a Cheshire grin you both look back and shout, “Beat you to the top of the mountain”, followed by the funnest sprint of both of your lives.”
Shannon L. Alder

“Am not afraid of being sad but happiness scares me, because it never lasts long....”
Agnes Christy

“A person has to be told he is going to die before he can live life to the fullest. True or false?'

'False. Once your death is established, it becomes impossible to live a satisfying life.'
'Would you prefer to know the exact date and time of your death?'

'Absolutely not. It's bad enough to fear the unknown. Faced with the unknown, we can pretend it isn't there. Exact dates would drive many to suicide, if only to beat the system.”
― Don Delillo (White Noise)

Elizabeth Gaskell
“Thus, you see, he arrived at the same end, via supposed duty, that he was previously pledged to via interest. I fancy a good number of us, when any line of action will promote our own interest, can make ourselves believe that reasons exist which compel us to it as a duty.”
Elizabeth Gaskell, My Lady Ludlow and Other Stories

“...time begins when we awaken and ends when we fall asleep...”
John Geddes, A Familiar Rain

Idries Shah
“You are still adrift while you still think that a means is an end.”
Idries Shah, Reflections

Shannon L. Alder
“God is up to something, but you will never know unless you figure out the difference between who is the messenger carrying your future and who is the person holding you back.”
Shannon L. Alder

Margaret Thatcher
“Left-wing zealots have often been prepared to ride roughshod over due process and basic considerations of fairness when they think they can get away with it. For them the ends always seems to justify the means. That is precisely how their predecessors came to create the gulag.”
Margaret Thatcher

Immanuel Kant
“Even if, by some especially unfortunate fate or by the niggardly provision of stepmotherly nature, [the good will] should be wholly lacking in the power to accomplish its purpose; if with the greatest effort it should yet achieve nothing, and only the good will should remain (not, to be sure, as a mere wish but as the summoning of all the means in our power), yet would it, like a jewel, still shine by its own light as something which has its full value in itself.”
Immanuel Kant

Auliq Ice
“Nothing ends with your voice 'it's over' , because you are not the ruler of your life instead you are the slave of your life. It continues, you wish or you may not. So hug the life as it's your partner at all moments. Sure it'll give you what you deserve for.”
Auliq Ice

M.F. Moonzajer
“Heterosexuality is the traditional way of expressing love and romance; the act of enjoyment between opposite sexes. It is not only for the purpose of enjoyment and pleasure, but also the human general survival. Whilst homosexuality is the freedom of enjoyment and pleasure from any means and ends.”
M.F. Moonzajer, LOVE, HATRED AND MADNESS

Laurence Sterne
“Thus,---thus my fellow labourers and associates in this great harvest of our learning, now ripening before our eyes; thus it is, by slow steps of casual increase, that our knowledge physical, metaphysical, physiological, polemical, nautical, mathematical, aenigmatical, technical, biographical, romantical, chemical, and obstetrical, with fifty other branches of it, (most of 'em ending, as these do, in "ical") have, for these two last centuries and more, gradually been creeping upwards towards that Acme of their perfections, from which, if we may form a conjecture from the advances of these last seven years, we cannot possibly be far off.

When that happens, it is to be hoped, it will put an end to all kind of writings whatsoever;--the want of all kind of writing will put an end to all kind of reading;---and that in time, "As war begets poverty, poverty peace,"---must, in course, put an end to all kind of knowledge,--and then---we shall have all to begin over again; or, in other words, be exactly where we started.”
Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

William Barrett
“The happiness of mankind, if it ever should come to pass, would still leave men asking: Why? What point to it? To what end?”
William Barrett, The Illusion of Technique: A Search for Meaning in a Technological Civilization

Yash Gupta
“Life starts on bed and ends on bed”
Yash Gupta

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