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Quotes About Divorce

Quotes tagged as "divorce" (showing 61-90 of 367)
Suzanne Finnamore
“Daily I walk around my small, picturesque town with a thought bubble over my head: Person Going Through A Divorce. When I look at other people, I automatically form thought bubbles over their heads. Happy Couple With Stroller. Innocent Teenage Girl With Her Whole Life Ahead Of Her. Content Grandmother And Grandfather Visiting Town Where Their Grandchildren Live With Intact Parents. Secure Housewife With Big Diamond. Undamaged Group Of Young Men On Skateboards. Good Man With Baby In BabyBjörn Who Loves His Wife. Dogs Who Never Have To Worry. Young Kids Kissing Publicly. Then every so often I see one like me, one of the shambling gaunt women without makeup, looking older than she is: Divorcing Woman Wondering How The Fuck This Happened.
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Jarod Kintz
“Divorce is the second worst event in a person’s life. The worst event, of course, is marriage.”
Jarod Kintz, This Book Has No Title

Robert Anderson
“In every marriage more than a week old, there are grounds for divorce. The trick is to find and continue to find grounds for marriage.”
Robert Anderson

Lisa Kleypas
“Bad divorce?" Hardy asked, his gaze falling to my hands. I realized I was clutching my purse in a death grip.

“No, the divorce was great,” I said. “It was the marriage that sucked.”
Lisa Kleypas, Blue-Eyed Devil

Suzanne Finnamore
“Soon he was online every night until one or two a.m. Often he would wake up at three of four a.m. and go back online. He would shut down the computer screen when I walked in. In the past, he used to take the laptop to bed with him and we would both be on our laptops, hips touching. He stopped doing that, slipping off to his office instead and closing the door even when A was asleep. He started closing doors behind him. I was steeped in denial, but my body knew.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“I mentally bless and exonerate anyone who has kicked a chair out from beneath her or swallowed opium in large chunks. My mind has met their environment, here in the void. I understand perfectly.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“How could you do that to me?" I repeat. I don´t have to itemize. He knows what I speak of.
Eventually N produces three answers, in this order:

1. "Because I am a complete rotter." I silently agree, but it´s a cop-out: I have maggots, therefore I am dead.
2. "I was stressed at work and unhappy and we were always fighting...and you know I was just crazy..."

I cut him off, saying, "You don´t get to be crazy. You did exactly what you chose to do."
Which is true, he did. It is what he has always done. He therefore seems slightly puzzled at the need for further diagnosis, which may explain his third response:

3. "I don´t know."

This, I feel instinctively, is the correct answer. How can I stay angry with him for being what he is? I was, after all, his wife, and I chose him. No coincidences, that´s what Freud said. None. Ever.
I wipe my eyes on my sleeve and walk toward the truck, saying to his general direction, "Fine. At least now I know: You don´t know."
I stop and turn around and fire one more question: a bullet demanding attention in the moment it enters the skin and spreads outward, an important bullet that must be acknowledged.
"What did you feel?"
After a lengthy pause, he answers. "I felt nothing."
And that, I realize too late, was not the whole truth, but was a valid part of the truth.
Oh, and welcome to the Serengeti. That too.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“I am replete with stamina in finding out every single fact I can about this whole affair.

Yet, I think, do I want to pull that thread? Do I want to unleash the truth, unravel deceit, and kill reality as I´ve known it? It is irreparable, if I do, from the moment we met until now. It is long. If I discover too much that is false about what I thought my past was, Time will be skewed even further. I already have a poor connection with the present. Example: I have no sense of what day it is. It´s better.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

John Barnes
“So we fell asleep holding hands. If married couples got to do this all the time, shit if I could understand how there were ever divorces, or even fights.”
John Barnes, Tales of the Madman Underground

Suzanne Finnamore
“Take me now, God!" I shout to the inky sky. "I´m ready."
"You´re not ready. You´re not even divorced yet," Bunny says. "You cannot die married to that man.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“How do you know? How best to ensure his nervous breakdown?" I ask.

"Keep going," Christian says. "Just go on as if nothing has happened. We all hate that.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“I should have known then it wasn´t nothing, as he called it. But I was eight months pregnant. No sense closing the barn door now, or so I thought. I swallowed the nothing, straightaway after the usual tears and denial.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“I feel angry but not homocidal; this may be unlooked-for progress.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Julie Powell
“Like the muscles knew from the beginning that it would end with this, this inevitable falling apart... It's sad, but a relief as well to know that two things so closely bound together can separate with so little violence, leaving smooth surfaces instead of bloody shreds.”
Julie Powell, Cleaving: A Story of Marriage, Meat, and Obsession

Craig Ferguson
“Divorce lawyers stoke anger and fear in their clients, knowing that as long as the conflicts remain unresolved the revenue stream will keep flowing.”
Craig Ferguson, American on Purpose: The Improbable Adventures of an Unlikely Patriot

John Irving
“The arrangements that couples make in order to maintain civility in the midst of their journey to divorce are often most elaborate when the professed top priority is to protect a child.”
John Irving

Shannon L. Alder
“A Plan B life can be just as good or better than a Plan A life. You just have to let go of that first dream and realize that God has already written the first chapter of the new life that awaits you. All you have to do is start reading!”
Shannon L. Alder

Suzanne Finnamore
“My mind floats like ash. I blame myself most cruelly.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

“And whosoever fears Allah and keeps his duty to Him, He will make a way for him to get out (from every difficulty).And He will provide him from (sources) he never could imagine.”
Anonymous, The Quran

Suzanne Finnamore
“The whole world seems tilted, my inner ear displaced by a hole where my spouse used to be.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Richard Ford
“Our ex-wifes always harbour secrets about us that make them irresistable. Until, of course, we remember who we are and what we did and why we are not married anymore.”
Richard Ford, The Lay of the Land

“Everything can change in a heartbeat; it can slip away in an instant. Everything you trust, and treasure, whatever brings you comfort, comes at a terrible cost. Health is temporary; money disappears. Safety is nothing big an illusion. 

So when the moment comes, and everything you depend upon changes, or perhaps someone you love disappears, or no longer loves you, must disaster follow? Or will you-somehow-adapt?”
Margaret Overton

Suzanne Finnamore
“I want to own this transition, not to simply swallow the shame of it entire. I will push for every little irony.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“How can I grieve what is still in motion?" I ask her. "Shoes are still dropping all over the place. I´m not kidding," I say. "It´s Normandy out there.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
Follow the Pfizer pill road!
Follow the Pfizer pill road!
Follow, follow, follow, follow,
Follow the Pfizer pill road!

Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“This people know where their husbands are. I would like to vomit. I would like to vomit my soul out.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“Yes. THANK YOU. And say hello to Judas Iscariot.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“The abandonment came, and now this shabby bacchanal.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Suzanne Finnamore
“This is much easier than when N left. Our son is unable to grasp and simultaneously turn doorknobs yet. If only this trick could be unlearned by men over thirty, many more families would celebrate Christmas together.”
Suzanne Finnamore, Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Jarod Kintz
“I think a great book title would be “Ida Says ‘I do’ in Idaho.” It would be about a divorce in Washington State, and the protagonist would be a woman, though I’m not sure what her name should be. 
”
Jarod Kintz, This Book Has No Title

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