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Quotes About Discrimination

Quotes tagged as "discrimination" (showing 1-30 of 106)
Zora Neale Hurston
“Sometimes, I feel discriminated against, but it does not make me angry. It merely astonishes me. How can any deny themselves the pleasure of my company? It’s beyond me.”
Zora Neale Hurston

Eric Berne
“The moment a little boy is concerned with which is a jay and which is a sparrow, he can no longer see the birds or hear them sing.”
Eric Berne

Bertrand Russell
“Collective fear stimulates herd instinct, and tends to produce ferocity toward those who are not regarded as members of the herd.”
Bertrand Russell, Unpopular Essays

Jim C. Hines
“Your religious beliefs are your business. They are not and should not be the basis for law. If you use them as justification to discriminate against others, don’t be upset when others decide you’re an asshole."

[Blog post of July 26, 2011]”
Jim C. Hines

Dorothy L. Sayers
“In reaction against the age-old slogan, "woman is the weaker vessel," or the still more offensive, "woman is a divine creature," we have, I think, allowed ourselves to drift into asserting that "a woman is as good as a man," without always pausing to think what exactly we mean by that. What, I feel, we ought to mean is something so obvious that it is apt to escape attention altogether, viz: (...) that a woman is just as much an ordinary human being as a man, with the same individual preferences, and with just as much right to the tastes and preferences of an individual. What is repugnant to every human being is to be reckoned always as a member of a class and not as an individual person.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

Mahatma Gandhi
“The only difference between man and man all the world over is one of degree, and not of kind, even as there is between trees of the same species.
Where in is the cause for anger, envy or discrimination?”
Mahatma Gandhi

Howard Zinn
“The prisons in the United States had long been an extreme reflection of the American system itself: the stark life differences between rich and poor, the racism, the use of victims against one another, the lack of resources of the underclass to speak out, the endless "reforms" that changed little. Dostoevski once said: "The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons."

It had long been true, and prisoners knew this better than anyone, that the poorer you were the more likely you were to end up in jail. This was not just because the poor committed more crimes. In fact, they did. The rich did not have to commit crimes to get what they wanted; the laws were on their side. But when the rich did commit crimes, they often were not prosecuted, and if they were they could get out on bail, hire clever lawyers, get better treatment from judges. Somehow, the jails ended up full of poor black people.”
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States: 1492 - Present

Lady Gaga
“The Monster Ball is by nature a protest: A youth church experience to speak out and celebrate against all forms of discrimination + prejudice.”
Lady Gaga

John Gower
“There is no deception on the part of the woman, where a man bewilders himself: if he deludes his own wits, I can certainly acquit the women. Whatever man allows his mind to dwell upon the imprint his imagination has foolishly taken of women, is fanning the flames within himself -- and, since the woman knows nothing about it, she is not to blame. For if a man incites himself to drown, and will not restrain himself, it is not the water's fault.”
John Gower, Confessio Amantis

Christopher Hitchens
“The one thing that the racist can never manage is anything like discrimination: he is indiscriminate by definition.”
Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22: A Memoir

Jarod Kintz
“I accept all people—even the people I find unacceptable.
”
Jarod Kintz, Seriously delirious, but not at all serious

Henry A. Wallace
“It may be shocking to some people in this country to realize that, without meaning to do so, they hold views in common with Hitler when they preach discrimination against other religious, racial or economic groups.”
Henry A. Wallace

Tetsuko Kuroyanagi
“Drying her eyes, Mother said to Totto-chan very slowly, "You're Japanese and Masao-chan comes from a country called Korea. But he's a child, just like you. So, Totto-chan, dear, don't ever think of people as different. Don't think, 'That person's a Japanese, or this person's a Korean.' Be nice to Masao-chan. It's so sad that some people think other people aren't nice just because they're Koreans.”
Tetsuko Kuroyanagi, Totto-chan: The Little Girl at the Window

Lish McBride
“Wind does not discriminate—it touches everyone, everything. He liked that about wind.”
Lish McBride, Necromancing the Stone

Sandy Fussell
“People are always afraid of anything different. They are afraid of change," says Sensai. "It is the same everywhere.”
Sandy Fussell, Shaolin Tiger

“We cannot keep turning our backs on gay and lesbian Americans. I have fought too hard and too long against discrimination based on race and color not to stand up against discrimination based on sexual orientation.”
John E Lewis

Jamie Ford
“Henry, this isn't about us. I mean it is, but they don't define you by the button you wear. They define you by what you do, by what your actions say about you. And coming here, despite your parents, says a lot to them- and me. And they're Americans first. They don't see you as the enemy. They see you as a person.”
Jamie Ford, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet

Amin Maalouf
“Taking the line of least resistance, we lump the most different people together under the same heading. Taking the line of least resistance, we ascribe to them collective crimes, collective acts and opinions. "The Serbs have massacred…", "The English have devastated…", "The Jews have confiscated…", "The Blacks have torched", "The Arabs refuse…". We blithely express sweeping judgments on whole peoples, calling them "hardworking" and "ingenious", or "lazy", "touchy", "sly", "proud", or "obstinate". And sometimes this ends in bloodshed."

– Amin Maalouf "On Identity”
Amin Maalouf

Dorothy L. Sayers
“Once lay down the rule that the job comes first and you throw that job open to every individual, man or woman, fat or thin, tall or short, ugly or beautiful, who is able to do that job better than the rest of the world.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

Julio Cortázar
“Se sabe que las bicicletas han tratado por todos los medios de remediar su triste condición social. Pero en absolutamente todos los países de la tierra 'está prohibido entrar con bicicletas'. Algunos agregan: 'y perros', lo cual duplica en las bicicletas y en los canes su complejo de inferioridad.”
Julio Cortázar, Historias de cronopios y de famas

Octavia E. Butler
“Nothing. It just finds you a lot more attractive than it does most Humans. What can you do with a beautiful woman that you can’t do with an ugly one? Nothing. It’s just a matter of preference.”
Octavia E. Butler, Adulthood Rites

Friedrich Nietzsche
“For nothing is more democratic than logic; it is no respecter of persons and makes no distinction between crooked and straight noses.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science: with a Prelude in Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs

L.E. Modesitt Jr.
“Words evolve, perhaps more rapidly and tellingly than do their users, and the change in meanings reflects a society often more accurately than do the works of many historians. In he years preceding the first collapse of NorAm, the change in the meaning of one word predicted the failure of that society more immediately and accurately than did all the analysts, social scientists, and historians. That critical word? 'Discrimination.' We know it now as a term meaning 'unfounded bias against a person, group, or culture on the basis of racial, gender, or ethnic background.' Prejudice, if you will.

The previous meaning of this word was: 'to draw a clear distinction between good and evil, to differentiate, to recognize as different.' Moreover, the connotations once associated with discrimination were favorable. A person of discrimination was one of taste and good judgment. With the change of the meaning into a negative term of bias, the English language was left without a single-word term for the act of choosing between alternatives wisely, and more importantly, left with a subterranean negative connotation for those who attempted to make such choices.

In hindsight, the change in meaning clearly reflected and foreshadowed the disaster to come. Individuals and institutions abhorred making real choices. At one point more than three-quarters of the youthful population entered institutions of higher learning. Credentials, often paper ones, replaced meaning judgment and choices... Popularity replaced excellence... The number of disastrous cultural and political decisions foreshadowed by the change in meaning of one word is truly endless...”
L.E. Modesitt Jr., Archform: Beauty

Jared Diamond
“Above all, it seems to me wrongheaded and dangerous to invoke historical assumptions about environmental practices of native peoples in order to justify treating them fairly. ... By invoking this assumption [i.e., that they were/are better environmental stewards than other peoples or parts of contemporary society] to justify fair treatment of native peoples, we imply that it would be OK to mistreat them if that assumption could be refuted. In fact, the case against mistreating them isn't based on any historical assumption about their environmental practices: it's based on a moral principle, namely, that it is morally wrong for one people to dispossess, subjugate or exterminate another people.”
Jared Diamond, Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed

“Proposition 8 fails to advance any rational basis in singling out gay men and lesbians for denial of a marriage licence. Indeed, the evidence shows Proposition 8 does nothing more than enshrine in the California constitution the notion that opposite-sex couples are superior to same-sex couples.”
― Vaughn Walker

“But I think what's important about this debate is not written into any specific 'gotcha' on this, but asking the question: What about freedom of speech? Should we limit speech from people we find abhorrent? Should we limit racists from speaking?

I don't want to be associated with those people, but I also don't want to limit their speech in any way in the sense that we tolerate boorish and uncivilised behavior because that's one of the things freedom requires: is that we allow people to be boorish and uncivilised, but that doesn't mean we approve of it.”
― Rand Paul

“The issue here revolves around the "right to be different (Mattos 1994:16). People have difficulty living harmoniously with those who are different. Because of this, they discriminate against anyone who has any distinctive characteristic whether of belief, religion, language, thought or color. ~ Valmor Da Silva p. 124 in Reading Other-Wise”
Gerald O. West, Reading Otherwise: Socially Engaged Biblical Scholars Reading with their Local Communities

Jarod Kintz
“Gather the wheelchairs in a circle, and then summon the cripples. Would anybody care for a glass of discrimination?
”
Jarod Kintz, Seriously delirious, but not at all serious

M.F. Moonzajer
“Humans are naturally elusioned in discrimination; it starts when we look for the first time in mirror”
M.F. Moonzajer

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