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Quotes About Disability

Quotes tagged as "disability" (showing 1-30 of 90)
Fred Rogers
“Part of the problem with the word 'disabilities' is that it immediately suggests an inability to see or hear or walk or do other things that many of us take for granted. But what of people who can't feel? Or talk about their feelings? Or manage their feelings in constructive ways? What of people who aren't able to form close and strong relationships? And people who cannot find fulfillment in their lives, or those who have lost hope, who live in disappointment and bitterness and find in life no joy, no love? These, it seems to me, are the real disabilities.”
Fred Rogers, The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember

Helen Keller
“It has been said that life has treated me harshly; and sometimes I have complained in my heart because many pleasures of human experience have been withheld from me…if much has been denied me, much, very much, has been given me…”
Helen Keller, The Open Door

Jarod Kintz
“Two one-armed people might seem perfect for each other, but what if they’re both missing the same arm? Then even something simple like holding hands while walking becomes a case of they’re too similar to see themselves really going anywhere as a couple.
”
Jarod Kintz, At even one penny, this book would be overpriced. In fact, free is too expensive, because you'd still waste time by reading it.

Charles Dickens
“Try not to associate bodily defect with mental, my good friend, except for a solid reason”
Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

Sarah Palin
“I've been so focused on state government, I haven't really focused much on the war in Iraq.”
Sarah Palin

Helen Keller
“I am conscious of a soul-sense that lifts me above the narrow, cramping circumstances of my life. My physical limitations are forgotten- my world lies upward, the length and the breadth and the sweep of the heavens are mine!”
Helen Keller, The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy

“I choose not to place "DIS", in my ability.”
Robert M. Hensel

“At the cross, Jesus subjects himself to disability, and his resurrected body continues to bear his scars as a sign of God's solidarity with humanity.”
Thomas E. Reynolds

“I will crawl upon my knees just to know the joy of suffering.”
Sidewalk Prophets

Kim Edwards
“What would happen, they conjectured, if they simply went on assuming their children would do everything. Perhaps not quickly. Perhaps not by the book. But what if they simply erased those growth and development charts, with their precise, constricting points and curves? What if they kept their expectations but erased the time line? What harm could it do? Why not try?”
Kim Edwards, The Memory Keeper's Daughter

Penelope Marzec
“That made love—not grace—the magic ingredient. Then a
new thought hit her. Perhaps love was grace. A shiver went
up her spine. What did that make anger? The antithesis of
grace?”
Penelope Marzec, A Rush of Light

Sandy Fussell
“Life is all about balance. Since I have only one leg, I understand that well.”
Sandy Fussell, Shaolin Tiger

“...Goddamn himself for letting his independence slip away from him. He didn't even know how it had happened, how he had lost the ability to function on his own, or what the hell he was going to do about it now.”
Kimberly Gardner, Too Soon For Love

“Near the end of Love's Labor, Eva Feder Kittay (1999, 154) writes that a fundamental aspect of a just society is related to the conditions and limits of mothering. In a just society, women with disabilities can mother because there is adequate emotional and material support for them to do so, and given a context of support and approval to reproduce, they can also choose not to bear children. In a just society, mothers of children with disability can mother, and they, their children, and other needed caregivers will be adequately supported." (15)”
Cynthia Lewiecki-Wilson and Jen Cellio, Disability and Mothering: Liminal Spaces of Embodied Knowledge

“Now, Woolf calls her fictional bastion of male privilege Oxbridge, so I'll call mine Yarvard. Even though she cannot attend Yarvard because she is a woman, Judith cheerfully applies for admission at, let's call it, Smithcliff, a prestigious women's college. She is denied admission on the grounds that
the dorms and classrooms can't
accommodate wheelchairs, that her speech pattern would interfere with her elocution lessons, and that her presence would upset the other students. There is also the suggestion that she is not good marriage material for the men at the elite college to which Smithcliff is a bride-supplying "sister school." The letter inquires as to why she hasn't been institutionalized.
When she goes to the administration building to protest the decision, she can't get up the flight of marble steps on the Greek Revival building. This edifice was designed to evoke a connection to the Classical world, which practiced infanticide of disabled newborns.”
Rosemarie Garland-Thomson

Cynthia Lord
“rules”
Cynthia Lord, Rules

“In America access is always about architecture and never about human beings. Among Israelis and Palestinians, access was rarely about anything but people. While in the U.S. a wheelchair stands out as an explicitly separate experience from the mainstream, in the Israel and Arab worlds it is just another thing that can go wrong in a place where things go wrong all the time.”
John Hockenberry, Moving Violations: War Zones, Wheelchairs, and Declarations of Independence

“The lingerie department is the only one that she can reach in her wheelchair. Nevertheless, she is fired the next day because of complaints that a woman who is so obviously not sexually attractive selling alluring nightgowns makes customers uncomfortable. Daunted by her dismissal, she seeks consolation in the arms of the young manager and soon finds herself pregnant. Upon learning
of this news, he leaves her for a
nondisabled woman with a fuller
bustline and better homemaking skills in his inaccessible kitchen.”
Rosemarie Garland-Thomson

“You can't keep rescuing me like this. You're supposed to be the angsty, surly cripple, and I'm supposed to be the one who comforts you and shows you life is still worth living.”
Molly Mirren, To Each Her Own

Randolph Bourne
“So to all who are situated as I am, I would say--Grow up as fast as you can.”
Randolph Bourne, The Radical Will: Selected Writings 1911-1918

Charisse Montgomery
“Parents of medically fragile children find themselves becoming experts in lots of different areas, including laws and regulations, research and treatments, and the various specialists that support the health of their children.”
Charisse Montgomery, Home Care CEO: A Parent's Guide to Managing In-home Pediatric Nursing

Charisse Montgomery
“The more love and support your child receives, the richer his or her life becomes, and nurses can certainly add to the circle of love surrounding your child.”
Charisse Montgomery, Home Care CEO: A Parent's Guide to Managing In-home Pediatric Nursing

Randolph Bourne
“Do not take the world too seriously, nor let too many social conventions oppress you.”
Randolph Bourne, The Radical Will: Selected Writings 1911-1918

Daniel Keyes
“Who's to say death is better than your darkness?”
Daniel Keyes

Leif Gregersen
“The measure of a man, or woman, is not so much what they have accomplished, though that has weight. It often is much more though what that man or woman has overcome to accomplish what they have.”
Leif Gregersen, Through The Withering Storm

“I think you have this . . . I don’t know . . . this tremendous capacity to see the beauty in everything–even in things that sometimes inspire pity or repulse others. That’s a gift, not a perversion.”
Molly Mirren, To Each Her Own

Charisse Montgomery
“An exhausted parent can’t provide the best care, although occasionally, we have all had to do so.”
Charisse Montgomery, Home Care CEO: A Parent's Guide to Managing In-home Pediatric Nursing

Nikki Rowe
“Everything is temporary,
almost like a passing fase,
some of laughter
Some of pain.
What we would do,
If we had the chance to explore
What we had taken for
Granted the very day before,
Some would say I'm selfish,
To hold a little sadness in my eyes,
But they don't feel the sorrow
When I can't do,
all that helps me feel alive.
I can express my emotions,
but I can't run wild and free,
My mind and soul would handle it
but hell upon my hip, ankle and knees,
This disorder came about,
as a friendship said its last goodbyes,
Soooo this is what I got given for all the years I stood by?
I finally stand still to question it, life it is in fact?
What the fuck is the purpose of it all if you get stabbed in the back?
And after the anger fills the air, the regret takes it places,
I never wanted to be that girl,
Horrid, sad and faded...
So I took with a grain of salt,
my new found reality,
I am not of my pain,
the disability doesnt define me.
I find away to adjust,
also with the absence of my friend,
I trust the choices I make,
allow my heart to mend.
I pick up the pieces
I retrain my leg,
I find where I left off
And I start all over again,
You see what happens...
When a warrior gets tested;
They grow from the ashes
Powerful and invested.
So I thank all this heartache,
As I put it to a rest,
I move forward with my life
And I'll build a damn good nest.”
Nikki Rowe

Amy Rankin
“teaching the students I did before the accident helped me understand that a disability isn't necessarily a bad thing. It can be handled”
Amy Rankin, Nobody Thought I Could Do It, But I Showed Them, and So Can You!

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