Quotes About Classics

Quotes tagged as "classics" (showing 1-30 of 298)
Italo Calvino
“A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say.”
Italo Calvino, The Uses of Literature

Kurt Vonnegut
“And so it goes...”
Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

Jane Austen
“For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Emily Brontë
“If you ever looked at me once with what I know is in you, I would be your slave.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Edmond Rostand
“A great nose may be an index
Of a great soul”
Edmond Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac

Homer
“…There is the heat of Love, the pulsing rush of Longing, the lover’s whisper, irresistible—magic to make the sanest man go mad.”
Homer, The Iliad

William Shakespeare
“O teach me how I should forget to think (1.1.224)”
William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

Zora Neale Hurston
“Some people could look at a mud puddle and see an ocean with ships.”
Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God

J.M. Barrie
“The last thing he ever said to me was, 'Just always be waiting for me, and then some night you will hear me crowing.”
J.M. Barrie

E.M. Forster
“When I think of what life is, and how seldom love is answered by love; it is one of the moments for which the world was made.”
E.M. Forster, A Room with a View

Mary Shelley
“nothing contributes so much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose”
Mary Shelley

William Makepeace Thackeray
“Which of us is happy in this world? Which of us has his desire? or, having it, is satisfied?”
William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair

Benjamin Disraeli
“The best way to become acquainted with a subject is to write about it. ”
Benjamin Disraeli

John Ruskin
“All books are divisible into two classes: the books of the hours, and the books of all Time.”
John Ruskin, Sesame and Lilies

Charlotte Brontë
“No mockery in this world ever sounds to me so hollow as that of being told to cultivate happiness. What does such advice mean? Happiness is not a potato, to be planted in mould, and tilled with manure. Happiness is a glory shining far down upon us out of Heaven. She is a divine dew which the soul, on certain of its summer mornings, feels dropping upon it from the amaranth bloom and golden fruitage of Paradise.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Clifton Fadiman
“When you re-read a classic you do not see in the book more than you did before. You see more in you than there was before.”
Clifton Fadiman, Any Number Can Play

Lao Tzu
“Countless words
count less
than the silent balance
between yin and yang”
Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

Horace
“Ut haec ipsa qui non sentiat deorum vim habere is nihil omnino sensurus esse videatur."

If any man cannot feel the power of God when he looks upon the stars, then I doubt whether he is capable of any feeling at all.”
Horace

Jane Austen
“They had no conversation together, no intercourse but what the commonest civility required. Once so much to each other! Now nothing! There had been a time, when of all the large party now filling the drawing-room at Uppercross, they would have found it most difficult to cease to speak to one another. With the exception, perhaps, of Admiral and Mrs. Croft, who seemed particularly attached and happy, (Anne could allow no other exception even among the married couples) there could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so simliar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved. Now they were as strangers; nay, worse than strangers, for they could never become aquainted. It was a perpetual estrangement.”
Jane Austen, Persuasion

Jane Austen
“What do you know of my heart? What do you know of anything but your own suffering. For weeks, Marianne, I've had this pressing on me without being at liberty to speak of it to a single creature. It was forced on me by the very person whose prior claims ruined all my hope. I have endured her exultations again and again whilst knowing myself to be divided from Edward forever. Believe me, Marianne, had I not been bound to silence I could have provided proof enough of a broken heart, even for you.”
Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

Sophocles
“Time, which sees all things, has found you out.”
Sophocles, Oedipus Rex

George Orwell
“If there really is such a thing as turning in one's grave, Shakespeare must get a lot of exercise.”
George Orwell, All Art is Propaganda: Critical Essays

Jane Austen
“You may only call me "Mrs. Darcy"... when you are completely, and perfectly, and incandescently happy.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

George Gordon Byron
“I live not in myself, but I become
Portion of that around me: and to me
High mountains are a feeling, but the hum
of human cities torture.”
George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage

Emily Brontë
“May you not rest, as long as I am living. You said I killed you - haunt me, then.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

Titus Lucretius Carus
“A man leaves his great house because he's bored
With life at home, and suddenly returns,
Finding himself no happier abroad.
He rushes off to his villa driving like mad,
You'ld think he's going to a house on fire,
And yawns before he's put his foot inside,
Or falls asleep and seeks oblivion,
Or even rushes back to town again.
So each man flies from himself (vain hope, because
It clings to him the more closely against his will)
And hates himself because he is sick in mind
And does not know the cause of his disease.”
Titus Lucretius Carus

Jane Austen
“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of someone or other of their daughters.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Roman Payne
“Alexander the Great slept with 'The Iliad' beneath his pillow. During the waning moon, I cradle Homer’s 'Odyssey' as if it were the sweet body of a woman.”
Roman Payne, Rooftop Soliloquy

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
“Unasked, Unsought, Love gives itself but is not bought”
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Complete Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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