Quotes About Chickens

Quotes tagged as "chickens" (showing 1-30 of 31)
Jonathan Stroud
“He was transfixed at the sight of the lords and ladies of his realm running about like demented chickens.”
Jonathan Stroud, The Amulet of Samarkand

Gail Carriger
“Isn't Bunson's training evil geniuses?"
"Yes, mostly."
"Well, is that wise? Having a mess of seedling evil geniuses falling in love with you willy-nilly? What if they feel spurned?"

"Ah, but in the interim, think of the lovely gifts they can make you. Monique bragged that one of her boys made her silver and wood hair sticks as anti-supernatural weapons. With amethyst inlay. And another made her an exploding wicker chicken."
"Goodness, what's that for?"

Dimity pursed her lips. "Who doesn't want an exploding wicker chicken?”
Gail Carriger, Etiquette & Espionage

C. JoyBell C.
“‎They are angry with me, because I know what I am." Said the little eagle. "How do you know that they are angry with you?" "Because, they despise me for wanting to soar, they only want me to peck at the dirt, looking for ants, with them. But I can't do that. I don't have chicken feet, I have eagle wings." "And what is so wrong with having eagle wings and no chicken feet?" Asked the old owl. "I'm not sure, that's what I'm trying to find out." "They hate you because you know that you are an eagle and they want you to think you are a chicken so that you will peck at the ground looking for ants and worms, so that you will never know that you are an eagle and always think yourself a chicken. Let them hate you, they will always be chickens, and you will always be an eagle. You must fly. You must soar." Said the old owl.”
C. JoyBell C.

Brad Pitt
“Shoving feathers up your butt does not make you a chicken.”
Brad Pitt

Karen Davis
“I am a battery hen. I live in a cage so small I cannot stretch my wings. I am forced to stand night and day on a sloping wire mesh floor that painfully cuts into my feet. The cage walls tear my feathers, forming blood blisters that never heal. The air is so full of ammonia that my lungs hurt and my eyes burn and I think I am going blind. As soon as I was born, a man grabbed me and sheared off part of my beak with a hot iron, and my little brothers were thrown into trash bags as useless alive.

My mind is alert and my body is sensitive and I should have been richly feathered. In nature or even a farmyard I would have had sociable, cleansing dust baths with my flock mates, a need so strong that I perform 'vacuum' dust bathing on the wire floor of my cage. Free, I would have ranged my ancestral jungles and fields with my mates, devouring plants, earthworms, and insects from sunrise to dusk. I would have exercised my body and expressed my nature, and I would have given, and received, pleasure as a whole being. I am only a year old, but I am already a 'spent hen.' Humans, I wish I were dead, and soon I will be dead. Look for pieces of my wounded flesh wherever chicken pies and soups are sold.”
Karen Davis

Shalom Auslander
“Roads are no place for naive chickens dreaming of nirvana.”
Shalom Auslander, Hope: A Tragedy

Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez
“Horses frighten me as much as chickens do,’ he said.

‘That is too bad, because lack of communication with horses has impeded human progress,’ said Abrenuncio. ‘If we ever broke down the barriers, we could produce the centaur.”
Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez

Mary Ann Shaffer
“People don't know how chickens can turn on you, but they can -- just like mad dogs.”
Mary Ann Shaffer, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

“If I didn't start painting, I would have raised chickens.”
Grandma Moses

Karen Davis
“Thus far, our responsibility for how we treat chickens and allow them to be treated in our culture is dismissed with blistering rhetoric designed to silence objection: “How the hell can you compare the feelings of a hen with those of a human being?” One answer is, by looking at her. It does not take special insight or credentials to see that a hen confined in a battery cage is suffering, or to imagine what her feelings must be compared with those of a hen ranging outside in the grass and sunlight. We are told that we humans are capable of knowing just about anything that we want to know—except, ironically, what it feels like to be one of our victims. We are told we are being “emotional” if we care about a chicken and grieve over a chicken’s plight. However, it is not “emotion” that is really under attack, but the vicarious emotions of pity, sympathy, compassion, sorrow, and indignity on behalf of the victim, a fellow creature—emotions that undermine business as usual. By contrast, such “manly” emotions as patriotism, pride, conquest, and mastery are encouraged.”
Karen Davis, Prisoned Chickens Poisoned Eggs: An Inside Look at the Modern Poultry Industry

Mark Forsyth
“So familiar are eggs to us, however, that in the eighteenth century they were referred to as cackling farts, on the basis that chickens cackled all the time and eggs came out of the back of them.”
Mark Forsyth, The Horologicon: A Day's Jaunt Through the Lost Words of the English Language

Elizabeth Enright
“Self-pity is the hens' besetting sin," remarked Mr. Payton. "Foolish fowl. How they came to achieve anything as perfect as the egg I do not know! I cannot fathom.”
Elizabeth Enright, Gone-Away Lake

Orson Scott Card
“Alvin smiled back, and kissed her. "People talk about fools counting chickens before they hatch. That's nothing. We name them.”
Orson Scott Card, Alvin Journeyman

Flannery O'Connor
“I am largely worried about wingless chickens. I feel this is the time for me to fulfill myself by stepping in and saving the chicken but I don't know how exactly since I am not bold. I only know I believe in the complete chicken. You think about the complete chicken for a while.”
Flannery O'Connor, The Habit of Being: Letters of Flannery O'Connor

Terry Pratchett
“Mr. False! No, don't start grabbing the chickens! Better off farmer with no chickens than a load of chickens with no farmer! Anyway, they'll probably float, or fly, or something!”
Terry Pratchett, Snuff

“... a hunger that is more than simply material connects the human who feeds the chickens to the chickens that feed the humans.”
Susan Merrill Squier, Poultry Science, Chicken Culture: A Partial Alphabet

Jonathan Safran Foer
“...that's the business model. How quickly can they be made to grow, how tightly can they be packed, how much or little can they eat, how sick can they get without dying. This isn't animal experimentation, where you can imagine some proportionate good at the other end of the suffering. This is what we feel like eating... Why doesn't a horny person have as strong a claim to raping an animal as a hungry one does to killing and eating it? It's easy to dismiss that question but hard to respond to it... How riveting wold the sound of a tortured animal need to be to make you want to hear it that badly?”
Jonathan Safran Foer, Eating Animals

“Now, brooder is an interesting word. People who worry a lot in silence are known as brooders. But then again so is a hen sitting on her eggs. The more I get to know chickens, the more I realize half our language comes from chickens. Well, not half. But an awful lot considering this isn't Latin or anything. Cooped up. Egghead. Hatch a plan. Henpecked. Pecker. Cock. Chickenshit. Chicken-scratch. A lot of chicken words are meant to deliver attitude, which isn't surprising to me now that I have chickens. Chickens aren't background animals like fish or sheep or horses. Chickens are in-your-face animals. Chickens if you have them, come to bracket your days. The rooster hollers all morning, and then in the evening the hens have left you their mysterious gift of eggs.

Silkies are said to be excellent brooders, to have a tendency toward "broodiness." This, too, is usually meant as a compliment.”
Jeanne Marie Laskas, Growing Girls: The Mother of All Adventures

Karen Davis
“More laying hens are slaughtered in the United States than cattle or pigs. Commercial laying hens are not bred for their flesh, but when their economic utility is over the still-young birds are trucked to the slaughterhouse and turned into meat products. In the process they are treated even more brutally than meat-type chickens because of their low market value. Their bones are very fragile from lack of exercise and from calcium depletion for heavy egg production, causing fragments to stick to the flesh during processing. The starvation practice known as forced molting results in beaded ribs that break easily at the slaughterhouse. Removal of food for several days before the hens are loaded onto the truck weakens their bones even more.

Currently, the U.S. egg industry and the American Veterinary Medical Association oppose humane slaughter legislation for laying hens on the basis that their low economic value does not justify the cost of 'humane slaughter' technology. The industry created the inhumane conditions that are invoked to rationalize further unaccountability and cruelty.”
Karen Davis, Prisoned Chickens Poisoned Eggs: An Inside Look at the Modern Poultry Industry

Jeffery Russell
“Chickens are true creatures of zen - they live only and absolutely for the moment. Their actions one particular second will not necessarily have any influence or bearing on their actions in the next second, nor are they necessarily influenced by their actions of the prior second. Chicken thoughts arrive in their tiny mad little minds like flashes of a strobe light, each light being an action, each flashing with the brilliance of a not very brilliant thing. Each action utterly random. The complete randomness of chaos. Chickens are notorious escape artists, not due to their ability to devise cunning plans as they huddle together in their coop beneath a bare light bulb, scratching out complex diagrams in the dirt, but simply out of sheet unpredictability. They are the pachinko balls of the animal kingdom, effecting their escapes through the simple device of, say, turning left for no particular reason.”
Jeffery Russell, The Dungeoneers

Karen Pryor
“Nancy taught two hens to help her sort flowers to make leis. She set them down by a basket of three colors of plastic flowers. One hen quickly pulled out all the red flowers, and another the white ones, leaving the pink flowers in the basket.”
Karen Pryor, Lads Before the Wind: Diary of a Dolphin Trainer

P.G. Wodehouse
“Have you ever seen a man, woman, or child who wasn’t eating an egg or just going to eat an egg or just coming away from eating an egg? I tell you, the good old egg is the foundation of daily life. Stop the first man you meet in the street and ask him which he’d sooner lose, his egg or his wife, and see what he says!”
P.G. Wodehouse, Love Among the Chickens

Barbara Kingsolver
“She kept her ears permanently tuned to the chicken voices outside, so knew immediately when a coyote had crept into the yard, and barreled screaming for the front door before the rest of us had a clue. (I don't know about the coyote, but I nearly needed CPR.) These hens owed their lives and eggs to Lily, there was no question.”
Barbara Kingsolver, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life

Terry Pratchett
“In the kitchen, chickens had overflowed into the sink. They weren't making much noise, except for the occasional 'werk' a chicken makes when it's a bit uncertain about things, which is more or less all the time.”
Terry Pratchett, Wintersmith

M.L. Stedman
“. . . Maatsuyker, the wild island south of Tasmania where it rained most days of the year and the chickens blew into the sea during storms.”
M.L. Stedman, The Light Between Oceans

Tucker Elliot
“It was only a couple of chickens. Real chickens. The kind that walk around clucking and pecking. Which is what they were doing. Only no one else seemed to care, or even notice. This is normal? Obviously I had a little hiccup reading my notecards. Understandable. I was talking to forty orphans who had to share a dirt floor with two chickens. No one in college had ever prepared me for this scenario.”
Tucker Elliot, The Rainy Season

Fannie Flagg
“Mrs. Threadgoode pulled something out of the Cracker Jack box and all of a sudden her eyes lit up. “Oh Evelyn, look! Here’s my prize. It’s a little miniature chicken… just what I like!” and she held it out for her friend to see.”
Fannie Flagg, Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe

Walter Moers
“Je weniger qualvoll die Todesart, desto weniger attraktiv die Tiere. Wenn du friedlich an Altersschwäche stirbst, siehst du nur ein Huhn. Das letzte Huhn. Es gackert, und du bist hinüber.”
Walter Moers, A Wild Ride Through the Night

Laura Kreitzer
“I like to eat chicken, but I don’t like live chickens. With their feathers and beaks and weird noises and flapping wings.” He visibly shivers, then points above his right eye. “How’d you think I got this scar?”
“I thought you said your sister threw something at you when you were a kiddie.”
Rob gives him a meaningful look.
“A chicken?”
Rob points at his scar again. “Them things are no joke.”
Laura Kreitzer, Burning Falls

“The chickens bounced onto the pink and purple bush and landed on Annika's head." It's funny because nobody has ever said that before. I should get an award or something because I just made history!”

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