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Quotes About Brave New World

Quotes tagged as "brave-new-world" (showing 1-27 of 27)
Aldous Huxley
“But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Neil Postman
“We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn't, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.

But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.

What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.”
Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

Aldous Huxley
“And that," put in the Director sententiously, "that is the secret of happiness and virtue — liking what you've got to do. All conditioning aims at that: making people like their unescapable social destiny.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“Did you ever feel, as though you had something inside you that was only waiting for you to give it a chance to come out? Some sort of extra power that you aren't using - you know, like all the water that goes down the falls instead of through the turbines?”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“Mother, monogamy, romance. High spurts the fountain; fierce and foamy the wild jet. The urge has but a single outlet. My love, my baby. No wonder those poor pre-moderns were mad and wicked and miserable. Their world didn’t allow them to take things easily, didn’t allow them to be sane, virtuous, happy. What with mothers and lovers, what with the prohibitions they were not conditioned to obey, what with the temptations and the lonely remorses, what with all the diseases and the endless isolating pain, what with the uncertainties and the poverty—they were forced to feel strongly. And feeling strongly (and strongly, what was more, in solitude, in hopelessly individual isolation), how could they be stable?”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“Back to culture. Yes, actually to culture. You can’t consume much if you sit still and read books.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Neil Postman
“What Huxley teaches is that in the age of advanced technology, spiritual devastation is more likely to come from an enemy with a smiling face than from one whose countenance exudes suspicion and hate. In the Huxleyan prophecy, Big Brother does not watch us, by his choice. We watch him, by ours. There is no need for wardens or gates or Ministries of Truth. When a population becomes distracted by trivia, when cultural life is redefined as a perpetual round of entertainments, when serious public conversation becomes a form of baby-talk, when, in short, a people become an audience and their public business a vaudeville act, then a nation finds itself at risk; a culture-death is a clear possibility.”
Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

Aldous Huxley
“Hug me till you drug me, honey; Kiss me till I'm in a coma: Hug me, honey, snuggly bunny; Love's as good as soma.”
Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley
“That is the secret of happiness and virtue -- liking what you've got to do.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“Las palabras, como los rayos X, atraviesan cualquier cosa, si uno las emplea bien.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“And do remember that a gramme is better than a damn.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“Community, Identity, Stability”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“One egg, one embryo, one adult - normality. But a bokanovskified egg will bud, will proliferate, will divide. From eight to ninety-six buds, and every bud will grow into a perfectly formed embryo, and every embryo into a full-sized adult. Making ninety-six human beings grow where one grew before. Progress.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Christopher Hitchens
“We can always be sure of one thing—that the messengers of discomfort and sacrifice will be stoned and pelted by those who wish to preserve at all costs their own contentment. This is not a lesson that is confined to the Testaments.”
Christopher Hitchens, Love, Poverty, and War: Journeys and Essays

Neil Postman
“What we are confronted with now is the problem posed by the economic and symbolic structure of television. Those who run television do not limit our access to information but in fact widen it. Our Ministry of Culture is Huxleyan, not Orwellian. It does everything possible to encourage us to watch continuously. But what we watch is a medium which presents information in a form that renders it simplistic, nonsubstantive, nonhistorical and noncontextual; that is to say, information packaged as entertainment. In America, we are never denied the opportunity to entertain ourselves.”
Neil Postman

Aldous Huxley
“Mustapha Mond paused, put down the first book and, picking up the other, turned over the pages. “Take this, for example,” he said, and in his deep voice once more began to read: “’A man grows old; he feels in himself that radical sense of weakness, of listlessness, of discomfort, which accompanies the advance of age; and, feeling thus, imagines himself merely sick, lulling his fears with the notion that this distressing condition is due to some particular cause, from which, as from an illness, he hopes to recover. Vain imaginings! That sickness is old age; and a horrible disease it is.
They say that it is the fear of death and of what comes after death that makes
men turn to religion as they advance in years. But my own experience has given me the conviction that, quite apart from any such terrors or imaginings, the
religious sentiment tends to develop as we grow older; to develop because, as
the passions grow calm, as the fancy and sensibilities are less excited and less
excitable, our reason becomes less troubled in its working, less obscured by the
images, desires and distractions, in which it used to be absorbed; whereupon
God emerges as from behind a cloud; our soul feels, sees, turns towards the
source of all light; turns naturally and inevitably; for now that all that gave to
the world of sensations its life and charms has begun to leak away from us, now
that phenomenal existence is no more bolstered up by impressions from within
or from without, we feel the need to lean on something that abides, something
that will never play us false-a reality, an absolute and everlasting truth. Yes, we
inevitably turn to God; for this religious sentiment is of its nature so pure, so
delightful to the soul that experiences it, that it makes up to us for all our other
losses.”’ Mustapha Mond shut the book and leaned back in his chair. “One of
the numerous things in heaven and earth that these philosophers didn’t dream
about was this” (he waved his hand), “us, the modern world. ’You can only
be independent of God while you’ve got youth and prosperity; independence
won’t take you safely to the end.’ Well, we’ve now got youth and prosperity
right up to the end. What follows? Evidently, that we can be independent of
God. ’The religious sentiment will compensate us for all our losses.’ But there
aren’t any losses for us to compensate; religious sentiment is superfluous. And
why should we go hunting for a substitute for youthful desires, when youthful
desires never fail? A substitute for distractions, when we go on enjoying all the
old fooleries to the very last? What need have we of repose when our minds
and bodies continue to delight in activity? of consolation, when we have soma?
of something immovable, when there is the social order?”
Aldous Huxley

Solange nicole
“I'm a little worried... Brave New World seems a bit more real everyday. . .”
Solange nicole

Aldous Huxley
“Ford's in his flivver; all's well with the world.”
Aldous Huxley

“It would be pleasant to believe that the age of pessimism is now coming to a close, and that its end is marked by the same author who marked its beginning: Aldous Huxley. After thirty years of trying to find salvation in mysticism, and assimilating the Wisdom of the East, Huxley published in 1962 a new constructive utopia, The Island. In this beautiful book he created a grand synthesis between the science of the West and the Wisdom of the East, with the same exceptional intellectual power which he displayed in his Brave New World. (His gaminerie is also unimpaired; his close union of eschatology and scatology will not be to everybody's tastes.) But though his Utopia is constructive, it is not optimistic; in the end his island Utopia is destroyed by the sort of adolescent gangster nationalism which he knows so well, and describes only too convincingly.

This, in a nutshell, is the history of thought about the future since Victorian days. To sum up the situation, the sceptics and the pessimists have taken man into account as a whole; the optimists only as a producer and consumer of goods. The means of destruction have developed pari passu with the technology of production, while creative imagination has not kept pace with either.

The creative imagination I am talking of works on two levels. The first is the level of social engineering, the second is the level of vision. In my view both have lagged behind technology, especially in the highly advanced Western countries, and both constitute dangers.”
Dennis Gabor, Inventing The Future

Aldous Huxley
“He rubbed his hands. For, of course, they didn't content themselves with merely hatching out embryos: any cow could do that.
"We also predestine and condition. We decant our babies as socialized human beings, as Alphas or Epsilons, as future sewage workers or future..." He was going to say "future World Controllers", but correcting himself, said "future Directors of Hatcheries" instead.”
Aldous Huxley

Henry David Thoreau
“We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing important to communicate... We are eager to tunnel under the Atlantic and bring the old world some weeks nearer to the new; but perchance the first news that will leak through into the broad flapping American ear will be that Princess Adelaide has the whooping cough.”
Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Aldous Huxley
“Dünyayı değiştirmek istedim, anladım ki kesin olarak değiştirebileceğiniz tek şey bizzat kendinizdir.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“Bottle of mine, it's you I've always wanted!
Bottle of mine, why was I ever decanted?

Skies are blue inside of you,
The weather's always fine;

For
There ain't no Bottle in all the world
Like that dear little Bottle of mine.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World/Brave New World Revisited

Aldous Huxley
“Pilkington, at Mombasa, had produced individuals who were sexually mature at four and full grown at six and a half. A scientific triumph. But socially useless. Six-year-old men and women were too stupid to do even Epsilon work. And the process was an all-or-nothing one; either you failed to modify at all, or else you modified the whole way. They were still trying to find the ideal compromise between adults of twenty and adults of six. So far without success. Mr Foster sighed and shook his head.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

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