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Quotes About Arthurian Legend

Quotes tagged as "arthurian-legend" (showing 1-30 of 30)
Marion Zimmer Bradley
“And so, perhaps, the truth winds somewhere between the road to Glastonbury, Isle of the Priests, and the road to Avalon, lost forever in the mists of the Summer Sea.”
Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Mists of Avalon

Michael Palin
“Listen -- strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.”
Michael Palin

Stephen R. Lawhead
“The Queen of Air and Darkness tilted back her head and laughed. A more ghastly sound I hope never to hear. ‘Do you think I care about these trifles?’
‘Murder is no trifle, woman,’ Arthur said.
‘No? How many men have you killed, Great King? How many have you slain without cause? How many did you cut down that you might have spared? How many died because you in your battle-rage would not heed their pleas for mercy?’
The High King opened his mouth to speak, but could make no answer.”
Stephen R. Lawhead, Arthur

Mary Stewart
“I am nothing, yes; I am air and darkness, a word, a promise. I watch in the crystal and I wait in the hollow hills. But out there in the light I have a young king and a bright sword to do my work for me, and build what will stand when my name is only a word for forgotten songs and outworn wisdom, and when your name, Morgause, is only a hissing in the dark.”
Mary Stewart, The Hollow Hills

Marion Zimmer Bradley
“A priestess of Avalon does not lie. But I am cast out of Avalon, and for this, and unless it is all to be for nothing, I must lie, and lie well and quickly”
Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Mists of Avalon

M.K. Hume
“At least Morgan is honest! Artor thought as he forced his tired lips to smile. She refuses to eat at my table because she is my enemy. How many of my guests pretend?”
M.K. Hume, Dragon's Child

Marion Zimmer Bradley
“I have neither talent or taste for kingship, cousin. I am a warrior, and to dwell always in one place and live at court would weary me to death!”
Marion Zimmer Bradley, The Mists of Avalon

M.K. Hume
“You hate him worse than me, you viper,’ he whispered as the stimulant cleared his brain.
‘Aye, lord, but here’s the oddity of it - I love him too.’ Morgan replied, her eyes void of all emotion.”
M.K. Hume, Dragon's Child

T.H. White
“Lancelot and Guenever were sitting at the solar window. An observer of the present day, who knew the Arthurian legend only from Tennyson and people of that sort, would have been startled to see that the famous lovers were past their prime. We, who have learned to base our interpretation of love on the conventional boy-and-girl romance of Romeo and Juliet, would be amazed if we could step back into the Middle Ages - when the poet of chivalry could write about Man that he had 'en ciel un dieu, par terre une deesse'. Lovers were not recruited then among the juveniles and adolescents: they were seasoned people, who knew what they were about. In those days people loved each other for their lives, without the conveniences of the divorce court and the psychiatrist. They had a God in heaven and a goddess on earth - and, since people who devote themselves to godesses must exercise some caution about the ones to whom they are devoted, they neither chose them by the passing standards of the flesh alone, nor abandoned it lightly when the bruckle thing began to fail.”
T.H. White, The Candle in the Wind

T.H. White
“Guenever never cared for God. She was a good theologian, but that was all. The truth was that she was old and wise: she knew that Lancelot did care for God most passionately, that it was essential he should turn in that direction. So, for his sake, to make it easier for him, the great queen now renounced what she had fought for all her life, now set the example, and stood to her choice. She had stepped out of the picture.

Lancelot guessed a good deal of this, and, when she refused to see him, he climbed the convent wall with Gallic, ageing gallantry. He waylaid her to expostulate, but she was adamant and brave. Something about Mordred seems to have broken her lust for life. They parted, never to meet on earth.”
T.H. White, The Book of Merlyn

Stephen R. Lawhead
“Stop, Morgian. Your wiles cannot avail you now.’ He turned to the High King and said, ‘The hurt this woman has done me, I readily forgive. It is for the harm that she has caused others that she is to be judged.”
Stephen R. Lawhead, Arthur

T.H. White
“The plain of Bedegraine was a forest of pavilions. They looked like old-fashioned bathing tents, and were every colour of the rainbow. ... There were heraldic devices worked or stamped on the sides ... Then there were pennons floating from the tops of the tents, and sheaves of spears leaning against them. The more sporting barons had shields or huge copper basins outside their front doors, and all you had to do was to give a thump on one of these with the butt-end of your spear, for the baron to come out like an angry bee and have a fight with you, almost before the resounding boom had died away. Sir Dinadain, who was a cheerful man, had hung a chamber-pot outside his.”
T.H. White, The Witch in the Wood

Rosemary Sutcliff
“No, don't draw away from me. Whatever else I am, I am your son - your most wretched son. If you do not hate me, try to love me a little, Father; it is lonely never to have been loved, only devoured.”
Rosemary Sutcliff

“Non, moi j'crois qu'il faut qu’vous arrêtiez d'essayer d'dire des trucs. Ça vous fatigue, déjà, et pour les autres, vous vous rendez pas compte de c'que c'est. Moi quand vous faites ça, ça me fout une angoisse... j'pourrais vous tuer, j'crois. De chagrin, hein ! J'vous jure c'est pas bien. Il faut plus que vous parliez avec des gens. (Arthur à Perceval)”
Alexandre Astier, Kaamelott - Livre 1 - Partie 1

Virginia Chandler
“John Matthews' title, 'Gawain, Knight of the Goddess', was confirmation that I wasn't imagining the many layers of Gawain, the court of King Arthur, and most assuredly Gawain's role as a Protector and Champion of the Mother Goddess”
Virginia Chandler

Virginia Chandler
“As we rode slowly through the battle camp, the sounds and smells of war overwhelmed my senses: horses stamping and sweating in anticipation; men shouting; the steady rhythm of metal grinding on stone; leather snapping and buckling, and woo
d crackling in flame. The simmering energy of warriors as they eagerly awaited battle slithered through the camp like an invisible serpent”
Virginia Chandler, The Green Knight's Apprentice

Virginia Chandler
“In the energies of the Green Knight, we have an Elder who comes to the entire court of Arthur to challenge and "open a bridge" to the Otherworld. Here is the Holly King, the Forest Lord, the Green Man. The Green Knight enters Arthur's court at a Yuletide festival and challenges at once both Arthur and his warriors to step forth and take part in the traditional Beheading contest”
Virginia Chandler

Virginia Chandler
“I suppose it could be said that indeed all my roads to Arthur have led to my novel, The Green Knight’s Apprentice. I read Malory when I was very young and my first reading left me with very v
ivid images that haunt me still: white stags, headless damsels, horns hanging from tree limbs, and giants. Oh yes, I had the usual sword in the stone, lady of the lake, and Holy Grail images, too, I assure you.”
Virginia Chandler

Virginia Chandler
“Once I discovered Robin Hood and the medieval poem “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,” I realized that I felt a very deep calling to the Wild forest, the deep forest, the Wood that holds the Deep Mysteries and where the Wild Hunt is run....”
Virginia Chandler

Virginia Chandler
“The Lord and Lady of the Fair Folk sat at our own table, dressed in robes of red and black, their faces painted in patterns with ash and oils. Their eyes were intense, almost searing, and I found myself still unable to hold their gaze for
more than a moment. I felt naked within their gaze, but even more so, unwhole. As if there were parts of me missing and only they knew where to find them”
Virginia Chandler, The Green Knight's Apprentice

Virginia Chandler
“There are well known Arthurian figures in the book, and some not so well known. Mabon plays a pivotal role in the tale as the Motherless Child who helps Rhowbyn, the narrator of the tale, to find and reconcile with his missing parent. Th
ere is a game of riddles in which Mabon and Rhowbyn engage that is both an homage to Tolkien and a nod of acknowledgement to events from 'The Mabinogion' and specifically the tale of Culwch and Olwen”
Virginia Chandler

Virginia Chandler
“In the Medieval poem, we are surrounded by Winter, but I always imagined the Green Chapel and the castle of Lord and Lady Bercilak in all seasons. I was quite convinced (and still am) that Gawain did not return to Camelot immediately after his initiatory encounter with the Green Knight. That's where 'The Green Knight's Apprentice' began, I think, in my imaginings of what Gawain would learn and experience after his initiation was complete”
Virginia Chandler

“La prochaine fois que vous faites venir un barde, je lui ouvre le bide de là à là, j'lui sors les boyaux et je file sa langue à bouffer aux chiens. C'est clair, ça ? (Arthur à Guenièvre)”
Alexandre Astier, Kaamelott, livre 1, deuxième partie : Episodes 51 à 100

“Une heure avant, je me dis toujours : "Tiens, je vais déjeuner avec Perceval, ça me fait plaisir". [...] Ça vous la coupe, ça, hein ? Bon, après, une fois que j'ai bouffé avec vous, je regrette, hein, on est d'accord. Arrivé au milieu du repas, j'ai toujours envie de vous éclater le crâne avec le tranchant de la coupe, là, vous voyez, pour vous faire... fermer votre gueule une bonne fois pour toutes... mais sinon... je vous aime.(Arthur à Perceval)”
Alexandre Astier, Kaamelott, Livre 2 partie 1, Episodes 1 à 50

“Eh bien, c'est l'histoire d'un petit ourson qui s'appelle… Arthur. Et y'a une fée, un jour, qui vient voir le petit ourson et qui lui dit : Arthur tu vas partir à la recherche du Vase Magique. Et elle lui donne une épée hmm… magique (ouais, parce qu'y a plein de trucs magiques dans l'histoire, bref) alors le petit ourson il se dit : "Heu, chercher le Vase Magique ça doit être drôlement difficile, alors il faut que je parte dans la forêt pour trouver des amis pour m'aider." Alors il va voir son ami Lancelot… le cerf (parce que le cerf c'est majestueux comme ça), heu, Bohort le faisan et puis Léodagan… heu… l'ours, ouais c'est un ours aussi, c'est pas tout à fait le même ours mais bon. Donc Léodagan qui est le père de la femme du petit ourson, qui s'appelle Guenièvre la truite… non, non, parce que c'est la fille de… non c'est un ours aussi puisque c'est la fille de l'autre ours, non parce qu'après ça fait des machins mixtes, en fait un ours et une truite… non en fait ça va pas. Bref, sinon y'a Gauvain le neveu du petit ourson qui est le fils de sa sœur Anna, qui est restée à Tintagel avec sa mère Igerne la… bah non, ouais du coup je suis obligé de foutre des ours de partout sinon on pige plus rien dans la famille… Donc c'est des ours, en gros, enfin bref… Ils sont tous là et donc Petit Ourson il part avec sa troupe à la recherche du Vase Magique. Mais il le trouve pas, il le trouve pas parce qu'en fait pour la plupart d'entre eux c'est… c'est des nazes : ils sont hyper mous, ils sont bêtes, en plus y'en a qu'ont la trouille. Donc il décide de les faire bruler dans une grange pour s'en débarrasser… Donc la fée revient pour lui dire : "Attention petit ourson, il faut être gentil avec ses amis de la forêt" quand même c'est vrai, et du coup Petit Ourson il lui met un taquet dans la tête à la fée, comme ça : "BAH !". Alors la fée elle est comme ça et elle s'en va… et voilà et en fait il trouve pas le vase. En fait il est… il trouve pas… et Petit Ourson il fait de la dépression et tous les jours il se demande s'il va se tuer ou… pas…”
Alexandre Astier, Kaamelott, Livre 3, première partie : Episodes 1 à 50

“C'est parce que je cherche le Graal que je suis roi. Et du coup que vous êtes reine. Si je cherchais pas le Graal, vous seriez encore en Carmélide en train de torcher le cul des vaches dans une des fermes de votre con de père !”
Alexandre Astier, Kaamelott, Livre 2, deuxième partie : Episodes 51 à 100

“On y voit comme à travers un pelle là-dedans... Hé lumières!!! Pff bande de fainéants... Ah ça, pour roupiller, vous êtes fortiche (s'esclaffe) Les chevaliers de la Table Ronde... CHEVALIERS DE MES DEUX !!! Chuis p... chuis pas roi, moi ? C'est p..., c'est pas moi le roi ?! (dégainant Excalibur) Et ça, c'est du nougat ??? Tout seul, je vais le chercher le Graal, moi, et la vie éternelle, c'est pour bibi !!! Et vous, vous irez vous gratter!!!”
Alexandre Astier, Kaamelott, Livre 2 partie 1, Episodes 1 à 50

“Qu'est-ce que c'est, le Graal? Vous savez pas vraiment! Et moi non plus! Et j'en ai rien à cirer! Regardez-nous: y'en a pas deux qui ont le même âge, pas deux qui viennent du même endroit! Des seigneurs, des chevaliers errants, des riches, des pauvres! Mais, à la table ronde, pour la première fois dans toute l'histoire du peuple breton, nous cherchons tous la même chose: le Graal! C'est le Graal qui fait de vous des chevaliers, des hommes civilisés, qui nous différencie des tribus barbares. Le Graal, c'est notre union. Le Graal c'est notre grandeur.”
Alexandre Astier, Kaamelott, livre 1, deuxième partie : Episodes 51 à 100

“The Lady smiled, close-mouthed. "You magicked for Arthur himself, Merlin. The Human part of you has always loved Arthur.”
Anne Eliot Crompton, Merlin's Harp

L.M. Montgomery
“We have The Idylls of the King in English class this term. I like some things in them, but I detest Tennyson's Arthur. If I had been Guinevere I'd have boxed his ears - but I wouldn't have been unfaithful to him for Lancelot, who was just as odious in a different way. As for Geraint, if I had been Enid I'd have bitten him. These 'patient Griseldas' deserve all they get.”
L.M. Montgomery, Emily Climbs

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